Record-breaking heat / July 29-30, 2009

July 31, 2009

Heat can be dangerous, even fatal

July 31, 2009

NEW — 2 p.m. July 31. 2009

Heat contributed to the death of a Seattle man, according to Public Health – Seattle & King County officials. Authorities said the man was in his 60s and had heart disease; they said heat was a contributing factor in his death.

Public health officials used the incident to reiterate the danger of heat for children, senior citizens and people with chronic illnesses.

“We know that heat puts additional stress on people with underlying chronic conditions, just like the flu and other infectious diseases,” Dr. David Fleming, director and health officer for Public Health – Seattle & King County, said in a news release. “Tragically, excessive heat exposure can be fatal, and it’s possible that we may see additional deaths before the heat wave ends.”

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Brush fire threatened highlands homes Tuesday night

July 30, 2009

NEW — 11:50 a.m. July 30, 2009

A brush fire tore through a greenbelt in the Issaquah Highlands last night and threatened several homes before firefighters extinguished the blaze.

Eastside Fire & Rescue crews responded to fire near Northeast Park Drive and Northeast Katsura Court around 8:40 p.m. Authorities said the fire encompassed a 100-foot-by-35-foot area comprised of trees and heavy brush.

Responders had received multiple reports of a growing fire in a greenbelt with a steep ravine. Authorities said the blaze threatened several homes and moved toward residences.

Firefighters took steps to ensure residences were not in danger. EFR’s specialized Wildland Team was called to help put out the fire. By the time additional crews arrived at the scene, the fire had been extinguished.

Emergency crews work to contain a brush fire in the Issaquah Highlands. — Tyler MacLeod

Emergency crews work to contain a brush fire in the Issaquah Highlands. — Tyler MacLeod

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Ozone pollution, caused by persistent heat this week, may create health risks

July 29, 2009

NEW — 2:20 p.m. July 28, 2009

Persistent high temperatures are raising ozone pollution in the greater-Seattle area and increasing health risks for sensitive populations, including children, teens, the elderly, people living with COPD, asthma or other lung disease, and people who work outdoors.

The Puget Sound Clean Air Agency announced today that air quality is expected to reach the “Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups,” or orange category, for some locations in King County. The American Lung Association in Washington is asking residents to take precautions and limit their exposure to unhealthy levels of air pollution.

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Lakeside in title game

July 29, 2009

NEW — 11:20 a.m. July 28, 2009

The Lakeside Recovery Senior team plays for the AAA American Legion baseball title today against Yakima Valley Pepsi Pak at 5 p.m. in Tacoma’s Heidelberg Park.

Lakeside walloped the Twin City Titans 12-2 July 28 to reach the state championship round.

The state champion advances to the Northwest Regional Tournament Aug. 6 in Medford, Ore.

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Gunman robbed Emerald City Sun tanning salon Tuesday night

July 29, 2009

NEW — 10:50 a.m. July 28, 2009

Emerald City Sun Tanning Center got burned Tuesday night when a man armed with a gun robbed the tanning salon.

At about 9:40 p.m., Issaquah Police responded to a call from the salon, 1175 N.W. Gilman Blvd., where an employee said a man entered the business and pretended to be a customer. He then brandished a handgun and demanded cash. He ordered the employee to the back of the business, and then fled from the store.

Police said the suspect is a white man between 30 and 35, 6 feet tall, 180 pounds with a medium build and short, dark hair. He was dressed in a dark-colored baseball cap, black T-shirt and camouflage, knee-length shorts.

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Owners howl at Timberlake Park dog ban

July 28, 2009

Molly Herman, of Lakemont, plays fetch with her 8-year-old black Lab Abby at Timberlake Park on Lake Sammamish. Dogs are no longer allowed at the park according to the city, which has put a sign up at the entrance of the park. ‘The sign doesn’t persuade me,’ Herman remarked with the intention of still bringing her dog to the quiet and secluded park. By Adam Eschbach

Molly Herman, of Lakemont, plays fetch with her 8-year-old black Lab Abby at Timberlake Park on Lake Sammamish. Dogs are no longer allowed at the park according to the city, which has put a sign up at the entrance of the park. ‘The sign doesn’t persuade me,’ Herman remarked with the intention of still bringing her dog to the quiet and secluded park. By Adam Eschbach

City officials have banned dogs from Timberlake Park, a slice of wooded land nestled against Lake Sammamish that is popular with pet owners.

Officials cited safety concerns related to dogs at the park, including reports of people being knocked down by unleashed canines, dogs fighting with each other and dogs bolting from the trail onto private property.

City spokeswoman Autumn Monahan said those safety concerns prompted the rule change for the 24-acre park.

“This is about making sure everyone feels comfortable at the park and safe,” she said. Read more

Public Meetings

July 28, 2009

July 30

Planning Policy Commission Read more

Girl injured by dart during Fugitive game

July 28, 2009

A girl was struck by a dart while playing a nighttime game of Fugitive, a popular activity among teens and young adults that has Issaquah Police concerned about trespassing and other issues. Read more

Poplars will be replaced with dogwood, gingko trees

July 28, 2009

Jose Ramirez pulls down a poplar tree, one of many poplars that have been dying from canker disease, the rotting of the trees from the inside. Northwest Landscape Services will be cutting down the remaining poplars along Gilman Boulevard and Front Street this week to prevent limbs from crashing on cars and injuring bystanders.By Adam Eschbach

Jose Ramirez pulls down a poplar tree, one of many poplars that have been dying from canker disease, the rotting of the trees from the inside. Northwest Landscape Services will be cutting down the remaining poplars along Gilman Boulevard and Front Street this week to prevent limbs from crashing on cars and injuring bystanders.By Adam Eschbach

City crews will remove 25 poplars at the southwest corner of Front Street North and Northeast Gilman Boulevard next week and replace the aging trees with gingko and dogwood trees.

The poplars — planted in 1972 — usually live for about 35 years. As the trees age and become less healthy, they can pose safety issues. Ginkgos are expected to live for more than 100 years; dogwoods could live for more than 50 years.

City officials plan to hire a contractor to remove the poplars in small segments. The waste will then be recycled. Read more

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