Iris Grill restaurant will close Tuesday

June 27, 2009

NEW — 6 p.m. June 27, 2009

After seven years of operation, the Iris Grill in Gilman Village is closing its doors Tuesday.

“Hopefully many people, if they have been here and like it, will come here to experience it one more time and give us the opportunity to say thank you,” owner Bill McIntyre said. “For those that perhaps have heard of us, but haven’t come in, here is the window of opportunity.”

The closure has been a few years coming, he said.

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Master Chorus Eastside’s tenth annual All-American Independence Celebration is Sunday

June 27, 2009

NEW — Noon, June 27, 2009

Master Chorus Eastside once again presents its very popular All-American Independence Celebration at 3 p.m. Sunday at Pickering Barn, 1730 10th Ave. N.W.

Full of fun, patriotic music and historical tidbits, this year’s celebration highlights American “firsts,” those extraordinary people and events that have blazed trails for others to follow.

Admission is $9 per person (children 9 and younger are free) or $25 per family.

For more information and tickets, call the Master Chorus Eastside office at 392-8446 or go here.

See JP Patches June 27 at the Issaquah Farmers Market

June 26, 2009

NEW — 5:48 p.m. June 26, 2009

It’s Kids Day tomorrow at the Issaquah Farmers Market from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. at Pickering Barn, 1730 10th Ave. N.W.

Legendary clown JP Patches will visit at 11 a.m. He’ll be followed by Matt Wells, a local magician, who is 10.

There will be pony rides on the grass lawn.

The Musik Nest will also hold music classes.

Call 837-3311.

Battle of Bothell lacrosse / June 26, 2009

June 26, 2009

High School math curriculum adoption is put on hold

June 25, 2009

NEW — 2:31 p.m. June 25, 2009

After community concern and lack of clarity at the state level, Issaquah School District Superintendent Steve Rasmussen told school board members June 24 that he had decided to delay the district’s high school math adoption for one year.

“The teachers on the adoption committee have done thorough, exceptional work and we don’t want to lose that. But it is prudent to wait for the dust to settle,” he said.

Teachers will continue to use the current math program, College Prep Mathematics, when students come back to class in the fall, said Patrick Murphy, executive director of secondary education.

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Bring questions to garden, historic roads open houses Thursday

June 24, 2009

NEW — 3:15 p.m. June 24, 2009

Pickering Farm Garden open house

Bring fresh ideas to a city open house Thursday night. City officials and Seattle Tilth staffers want to hear suggestions for improving Pickering Farm Garden.

The open house is from 5-7 p.m. at City Hall Northwest, 1775 12th Ave. N.W.

City officials formed a partnership with the Tilth to plant the seed for the garden’s vision, design and growth.

Officials have received several ideas for the garden, including establishing city demonstration gardens, offering hands-on educational opportunities for organic gardening, creating a hub of a connected community trail system that includes other community garden sites and connecting to a Gilman Boulevard edible landscaping parkway.

Pickering Farm Garden is located on the west side of Pickering Barn. City and Tilth employees hosted an earlier open house related to the garden June 11.

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Plane crashes into Lake Sammamish; pilot unhurt

June 24, 2009

UPDATED — 12:36 p.m. June 24, 2009

Paul Weston pointed to a purple dot, about the size of dime, on the crook of his right arm — the only sign on his entire body that he had just crashed a plane into Lake Sammamish.

“I’m just thanking the lord that everything turned out fine,” Weston said.

The 83-year-old Redmond resident was testing out a seaplane he designed when he came in at angle, dipping the left wing into the water, and crashed at 10:45 a.m. today. The flight lasted about five minutes, starting with an eastward takeoff that ended as Weston circled back around and tried to land. The plane hit the water about 300 yards from Vasa Park in Bellevue.

Paul Weston, of Redmond, an experimental float plane pilot, talks on his phone at a Vasa Park boat launch ramp after a safe but ungraceful landing June 24 in waters off the park on Lake Sammamish.  By Greg Farrar

Paul Weston, of Redmond, an experimental float plane pilot, talks on his phone at a Vasa Park boat launch ramp after a safe but ungraceful landing June 24 in waters off the park on Lake Sammamish. By Greg Farrar

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Summer 2009 Issaquah Living

June 24, 2009

To view Issaquah Living – Summer 2009, click on the link below.

Class of 2009: 93 percent pass WASL, graduate on time

June 23, 2009

State average is 72 percent

This year’s Issaquah School District graduates are ahead of their statewide peers when it comes to graduating on time and meeting state requirements.

State Superintendent Randy Dorn announced some preliminary graduation information regarding students in the class of 2009. It is the second year students have been required to pass the reading and writing Washington Assessment of Student Learning exams. They are also required to pass the mathematics WASL exam and/or take the exam and additional math courses or another exam to fulfill the requirement.

In addition to passing the WASL, students are also required to complete a high school and beyond plan, a culminating high school project and meet their district’s credit requirements.

This year, 93 percent of students from the class of 2009 passed the reading and writing requirements of the WASL, according to the state superintendent’s office. Other information about WASL math scores wasn’t available and won’t be until the fall or winter.

However, the state’s on time graduation rate in 2008 was 72 percent. Students who graduate on time are those that do so in four years, ninth through 12th-grade. The state’s dropout rate is nearly 6 percent.

In Issaquah, district officials handed 1,104 students in the class of 2009 their diplomas. Issaquah’s on-time graduation rate has been 92.6 percent and its dropout rate has been 1.6 percent in recent years.

Only three students districtwide didn’t receive their diplomas.

Those three students would have graduated if they had been able to meet state standards for the WASL. However, two of the students are English language learners, still trying to master enough English skills to pass the exam; the third is a special-education student.

State officials’ focus in coming years is shifting from the WASL to implementing a new assessment system, which will begin next spring.

The new system will reduce testing time but still capture student performance on necessary skills and will mainly be provided online.

Details regarding that system are still vague. However, students in grades six through eight will take online reading and math tests beginning next spring.

In spring 2011, students in grades five through eight will take reading, writing, math and science tests online and high school students will take reading, writing and math exams online. By spring 2012, students in grades four through eight will take online reading, writing, math and science exams and high schoolers will take online reading, math and science exams.

The goal is to reduce the dropout rate by reducing testing time and putting more emphasis on identifying children’s learning needs in and outside the classroom to help them pass.

“Keeping students in high school and engaged in learning is an issue that every community, school, legislator and state leader must address,” Dorn said in a press release. “We can’t afford to fail our students.”

Officials advise to plan ahead for summer roadwork

June 23, 2009

roads-construction-20090624State transportation officials have spent months warning Eastside commuters about weeks of traffic congestion and headaches when the westbound Interstate 90 floating bridge shuts down next month. But other roadwork closer to home could also complicate commutes for Issaquah drivers.

City, county and state crews will resurface roads, build sidewalks and shore up overpasses in Issaquah and the surrounding area. Other, long-term construction projects — like the state Route 900 widening — will continue through summer.

“Compared to past years, it’s a little more than average but far from the busiest,” City Public Works Engineering Director Bob Brock said. Read more

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