Next arrival at Cougar Mountain Zoo could be cheetah

June 9, 2009

A cheetah could be the next addition to Cougar Mountain Zoo’s big cat collection, a zoo administrator said last week. Read more

27-year-old Issaquah man dies in Hobart Road rollover

June 9, 2009

A 27-year-old Issaquah man died late June 5 near the church where he was baptized when his sport-utility vehicle veered off the road and rolled several times in the 10100 block of Issaquah-Hobart Road. Read more

A breath of fresh air

June 9, 2009

Issaquah woman trains for marathon with new set of lungs

 

Carla Trulson-Essenberg works out four times a week at Klahanie Fitness on a treadmill and with weights. Below, Trulson-Essenberg is thumbs up at the University of Washington Medical Center after her double lung transplant surgery (left), then recovers on her couch at her Klahanie home. By Greg Farrar

Carla Trulson-Essenberg works out four times a week at Klahanie Fitness on a treadmill and with weights. Below, Trulson-Essenberg is thumbs up at the University of Washington Medical Center after her double lung transplant surgery (left), then recovers on her couch at her Klahanie home. By Greg Farrar

Nearly four years ago, Carla Trulson-Essenberg, didn’t dream of walking to the mailbox. She couldn’t. Even with oxygen at 56, the slight incline from her doorstep up her driveway was an impossible obstacle. 

But today, she is breathing new life into someone else’s lungs and training for Seattle’s Rock ‘n’ Roll half-marathon. 

“I feel younger than I did when I was in high school,” she said. “I did not know that people breathed like this. I always thought one had to work at it.”

Trulson-Essenberg had a double lung transplant Oct. 31, 2004. 

“Ninety-four percent of recipients three years after transplantation live their lives with no assistance. They aren’t just surviving, but they are thriving,” said Mike Mulligan, her surgeon at the University of Washington Medical Center. “Carla is representative of that.” 

Trulson-Essenberg has had breathing problems her entire life, but she said she refused to think of herself as anything but normal. Read more

Deadline extended for Salmon Days artists

June 9, 2009

The deadline has been extended to June 25 for area artists to create a special artist edition retail item for this year’s Issaquah Salmon Days Festival

Read more

To The Editor

June 9, 2009

 

Memorial Day

Issaquah VFW thanks Issaquah  community for joining service Read more

Candidates file for City Council, school board, more

June 9, 2009

Mayor Frisinger unopposed

Mayor Ava Frisinger will run unopposed for a fourth term and seven City Council candidates will battle for four seats, according to unofficial King County Elections filings. Read more

Local dancer has the right moves

June 9, 2009

Paris Torres, a 19-year-old Skyline High School graduate, has been selected=

Paris Torres, a 19-year-old Skyline High School graduate, has been selected for the top 20 of the television reality series, “So You Think You Can Dance.” Photo by Mike Ruiz/FOX

Issaquah’s Paris Torres has placed in the top 20 on the television show “So You Think You Can Dance.”

“I wasn’t expecting anything and I went in with an open mind. If I didn’t make it, it’s not the end of the world, I’d pick it up and keep going,” Torres said in a June 9 telephone interview from Los Angeles. “But to make this year’s top 20, man, is serious business. Daily, I wake up thinking, ‘Wow, how’d I make it this far?’ These dancers are amazing.”

The 19-year-old, whose specialty is contemporary dance, is a graduate of Skyline High School. She began dancing when she was 6.

“My parents got me dance lessons for a Christmas present,” she said. “I looked at the present, which was a piece of paper that said a month worth of dance lessons and thought it was awesome, but where were my other presents?

“As I got older, it didn’t hit me until I was about 13, those drama-filled teen years, that this is the best escape for me,” she added. “I could go into the dance studio and everything would leave you.”

Since that time, Torres has been a Miss Washington Teen pageant winner and was a Seattle Storm and Seattle SuperSonics junior dancer from 2000-2003. Read more

Press Editorial

June 9, 2009

Issaquah School District graduates continue to make the news. Brian Yorkey, Issaquah High graduate, receives a Tony Award for Best Original Score for which he authored the lyrics. Paris Torres, Skyline High Class of 1999, places in the top 20 on the television show, “So You Think You Can Dance.” Read more

In tough times, volunteers offer the needy a free meal

June 9, 2009

Don Long serves himself lunch provided by friends and neighbors who come to the Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank every Thursday to supply free meals. By Adam Eschbach

Don Long serves himself lunch provided by friends and neighbors who come to the Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank every Thursday to supply free meals. By Adam Eschbach

They say nothing comes free, but in Issaquah that’s not the case for a good lunch. 

Every Thursday at noon, card tables are quickly set up and a smorgasbord of food is splayed. Sandwiches, soups, pastries, fruits and drinks are crammed onto tables as patrons of the Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank wait patiently to dig in. 

“It’s really cool that the community reaches out to people in need here,” said a woman in line in her mid-30s. (The woman said she didn’t want to be named, because she lives in the area and has a teen daughter.) “I’m really appreciative.”

The free lunch is thanks to a handful of local friends and volunteers. 

“It’s meant to share a meal, share food. It’s something so easy to do,” said Marilyn Ottinger, an organizer. “And now, wow. We have all these new friends with us.”

“It’s nice that there’s help when you’re financially strapped, and this is nice, freshly prepared food,” the woman in line, a former corporate trainer, said. Read more

Off The Press

June 9, 2009

Zoo invites visitors, wary reporter to feed grizzlies

Woodland Park Zoo visitors ogle resident grizzlies Keema and Denali from behind thick glass and across an enclosure landscaped to hide the barrier between man and beast. Outfitted with a bubbling stream and evergreens, the bear exhibit resembles a stretch of Pacific Northwest wilderness once part of the grizzly’s range.

Zookeepers know the grizzly habitat can resemble a campsite after a few tweaks. On June 6, keepers transformed the grizzly habitat into a campsite, albeit one pitched by ignorant campers and stocked with provisions that can bring grizzlies and humans into contact with one another.

As part of the annual Bear Affair, keepers shooed the grizzlies from the habitat while they added a haphazard campsite to the enclosure. Food was stored near the tent, trash was left unsecured — both no-nos for campers hoping to avoid an unfortunate grizzly encounter. When keepers released grizzlies into the redone enclosure, Keema and Denali made short work of the nylon tent, rubber raft and plastic coolers left behind by nonexistent campers.

I imagined the bears would tear through the mock campsite, using their claws — each 3 to 4 inches long — to wreak havoc. Instead, Keema and Denali moved methodically through the campsite, relying on their powerful noses to direct them to the choicest items left behind by their keepers.

I watched as one of the bears lumbered away from his brother to eat a box of cereal. Even bears hoard Cap’n Crunch. Meanwhile, the other bear shredded a raft into confetti-sized pieces and then used his powerful paws to pry open a beverage cooler filled with juice. Less than 40 minutes after the bears set upon the campsite, only debris remained.

Zookeepers hosted a second campsite demonstration later. During the second round, however, keepers used bear-safe provisions and techniques — safer for bears and humans alike.

Humans continue to encroach on bear habitat. Bear Affair was set up to alert people about how interactions between bear and man can be detrimental to both species. Read more

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