City officials consider ban on polystyrene

June 16, 2009

By Warren Kagarise
City officials could ban polystyrene food containers, ending the use of Styrofoam to-go boxes early next year. A proposed ban under review by officials said the material has limited usefulness, but can linger in landfills for centuries.
Legislation to ban polystyrene food packaging was scheduled to go to the City Council for the first time June 15, after The Press’ deadline. Council members were expected to refer the bill to the Council Sustainability Committee for further discussion. The committee was set to discuss the bill June 16. If the committee OKs the bill, the measure would return to the full council for approval, likely sometime this summer.
With the proposed ordinance, officials will consider spending city money to educate business owners about the proposed ordinance and engage them through an outreach campaign.
City Resource Conservation Office Manager David Fujimoto said Seattle and Portland have similar polystyrene bans. He said city officials would work to inform business owners about the change if the council enacts the ban.
If enacted, the ban would go into effect Jan. 1. The ordinance would prohibit the use of polystyrene food packaging from food service businesses and in city operations, according to the legislation. Instead, officials would encourage businesses to use recyclable or compostable food containers.
The proposed legislation does not specify how the ban would be enforced. The bill directs city staffers to focus on outreach and education in the months leading up to the ban.
Some products — such as prepackaged soups and foods purchased in prepackaged multiple quantities — would be exempt from the ban.
Polystyrene opponents say food containers made from the material should be banned, because discarded polystyrene persists as litter and in landfills. Recycling facilities in Washington are not set up to handle polystyrene.
“There are currently no meaningful ways of recycling polystyrene based food packaging and it must be disposed of as garbage,” according to the bill. “Compostable and recyclable alternatives are available that serve the same purpose as nonrecyclable food service packaging.”
Officials have enacted measures to prevent waste and encourage recycling to steer more than 65 percent of trash away from the county Cedar Hills Regional Landfill, according to city figures.
Reach Reporter Warren Kagarise at 392-6434, ext. 234, or wkagarise@isspress.com. Comment on this story at www.issaquahpress.com.

City officials could ban polystyrene food containers, ending the use of Styrofoam to-go boxes early next year. A proposed ban under review by officials said the material has limited usefulness, but can linger in landfills for centuries. Read more

School computers go on sale

June 16, 2009

Need a computer or desk and don’t mind if they’re slightly used?
The Issaquah School District will have a surplus sale from 3-5 p.m. June 25 at the May Valley Service Center, 16430 S.E. May Valley Road, Renton.
Cash and checks are accepted. Call 837-7071.

Need a computer or desk and don’t mind if they’re slightly used? Read more

Hay spill snarls I-90 traffic

June 16, 2009

By Chantelle Lusebrink
A truck and trailer lost dozens of bales of hay on Interstate 90 under the Highlands Drive overpass this afternoon at 3:11 p.m. causing at times a half-mile to a mile backup of rush-hour traffic.
The truck and trailer was traveling westbound on the freeway in the center lane when a gold four-door sedan, driven by a woman with dark brunette hair, suddenly pulled in front of them.
“The woman cut over and was four car lengths in front of us when she cut over from the left and stopped in front of us, leaving less than half a car length,” said the woman, adding the car looked like a Honda Accord. “We couldn’t even see her tail lights. That’s how close she was. So, we laid on the horn.”
The man and woman in the truck pulling the hay said they had to break heavily and tried to navigate into the far right lane to avoid an accident, the woman said.
“That’s when it started swaying and we started losing it,” she said.
The man and woman  said they didn’t want to give their names, but did say they were transporting the hay from a local farm in the area to the woman’s home.
The two pulled off the interstate and onto the shoulder and called police. State troopers responded to the scene at 3:21 p.m., Trooper Dustin Drout said.
By the time they arrived, a trail of hay was strewn over the right-hand lane, beginning just before the overpass and ending about a quarter-mile west of it. Troopers closed the right-hand lane and helped clear debris from the roadway.
The trailer was carrying about six tons of hay and each ton is worth about $220, Drout said.
The man and woman and state troopers were still trying to estimate the total loss as some of the hay was being recovered. The couple said they were also losing income for their extra time.
Reach Reporter Chantelle Lusebrink at 392-6434, ext. 241, clusebrink@isspress.com.
Traffic slows on Interstate 90 as a man tries to reload some of the hay that spilled from his truck. By Kathleen R. Merrill

Traffic slows on Interstate 90 as a man tries to reload some of the hay that spilled from his truck. By Kathleen R. Merrill

A truck and trailer lost dozens of bales of hay on Interstate 90 under the Highlands Drive overpass this afternoon at 3:11 p.m. causing at times a half-mile to a mile backup of rush-hour traffic.

The truck and trailer was traveling westbound on the freeway in the center lane when a gold four-door sedan, driven by a woman with dark brunette hair, suddenly pulled in front of them.

“The woman cut over and was four car lengths in front of us when she cut over from the left and stopped in front of us, leaving less than half a car length,” said the woman, adding the car looked like a Honda Accord. “We couldn’t even see her tail lights. That’s how close she was. So, we laid on the horn.”

The man and woman in the truck pulling the hay said they had to break heavily and tried to navigate into the far right lane to avoid an accident, the woman said. Read more

Habitat, city break ground for new highlands development

June 16, 2009

By Warren Kagarise
Meet the Taltons, a family of five that will soon be residents of the Issaquah Highlands.
Alissa Talton had no idea she would be moving to the hillside community until three weeks ago, when Habitat for Humanity officials surprised her at her parents’ Carnation home. Habitat officials presented Talton with a balloon and said her family had been chosen to live in a planned Issaquah Highlands development — the first Habitat houses to be built in Issaquah in 15 years. Talton was speechless. Her husband, a deployed Navy reservist, watched the event unfold over the messaging service Skype.
“I started crying and shaking,” Alissa Talton recalled. “I was so excited.”
She joined city officials and Habitat for Humanity of East King County representatives June 11 to break ground for the new development, five duplexes that will house 10 families. The late afternoon groundbreaking was ceremonial; volunteers will start construction at the site next month.
Tom Granger, executive director of the local Habitat branch, lauded city officials and highlands developer Port Blakely Communities for supporting the project. Habitat purchased the land with help from the city, Port Blakely and A Regional Coalition for Housing, an organization of Eastside cities and King County that works to increase the supply of affordable housing.
“This is an opportunity we’ve been talking about for a long time,” Granger said.
He credited the city and Port Blakely for taking steps to increase the availability of affordable housing.
“I have felt nothing but welcome since the first time we discussed this project,” he said.
Volunteers will construct five duplexes along a stretch of Northeast Magnolia Street near Northeast Logan Street. On a clear day, the Olympic Mountains are visible from the site.
“The view from here is absolutely magnificent,” Granger said. “We have God to thank for that.”
Construction will take place in two phases. Residents are set to move into the first houses early next year. Habitat officials plan to complete the project by 2012.
The homes will range from 1,000 to 1,400 square feet, and from two to four bedrooms. Volunteers will complete 90 percent of the labor. Families in the Habitat program are required to contribute 500 hours of sweat equity toward their new homes.
Mayor Ava Frisinger said Habitat would find many volunteers in Issaquah. She talked with members of several Issaquah churches, who said they were interested in contributing to the construction effort.
“There are an awful lot of people who want to come up here and build houses,” Frisinger said.
Talton said she and her family are ready to volunteer. Her husband, Mikel, is a Navy reservist stationed in the United Arab Emirates. Her husband left for his deployment in January. Talton and her three children — Mikayla, 14, Hayleigh, 3, and Isaiah, 2 — have been living with her parents in Carnation.
Talton said she looks forward to the stability of owning her own home. She said living in Issaquah appeals to her because her family lives in the area as well.
“I know my kids will grow up here,” she said.
Habitat homeowners are chosen based on their need and ability to pay the mortgage. They earn $20,400 to $40,700 — less than half of the 2008 King County median income for a family of four. To earn their homes, they must contribute the volunteer hours by working on their house or another Habitat property. Homeowners are required to live or work in King County for at least a year.
Habitat homes are sold at cost — about $100,000. Homeowners repay no-interest loans and Habitat retains ownership of the land.
Lola Reyes visited the development site two nights before the groundbreaking ceremony. She said she looks forward to moving with her two sons from Bellevue to the highlands.
“Everything is beautiful,” she said. “It’s a very clean, family-oriented, safe area.”
Reyes learned her family had been selected to live in the development via a letter from Habitat officials. When she plucked the letter from her post office box, she said she steeled herself for the worst.
Exhausted from moving the day before, Reyes was ready to toss the bad news into a nearby recycling bin. She could not believe her good fortune as she began to read the letter.
“It was like hitting the Lotto,” she said.
Reach Reporter Warren Kagarise at 392-6434, ext. 234, or wkagarise@isspress.com. Comment on this story at www.issaquahpress.com.
Alissa Talton and daughter Hayleigh (center), 3, whose husband and father is deployed in the United Arab Emirates, are surrounded by officials from Port Blakely, Habitat for Humanity and city and state officials June 11 as they turn over the first shovels of dirt at the Issaquah Highlands home site. By Greg Farrar

Alissa Talton and daughter Hayleigh (center), 3, whose husband and father is deployed in the United Arab Emirates, are surrounded by officials from Port Blakely, Habitat for Humanity and city and state officials June 11 as they turn over the first shovels of dirt at the Issaquah Highlands home site. By Greg Farrar

Meet the Taltons, a family of five that will soon be residents of the Issaquah Highlands.

Alissa Talton had no idea she would be moving to the hillside community until three weeks ago, when Habitat for Humanity officials surprised her at her parents’ Carnation home. Habitat officials presented Talton with a balloon and said her family had been chosen to live in a planned Issaquah Highlands development — the first Habitat houses to be built in Issaquah in 15 years. Talton was speechless. Her husband, a deployed Navy reservist, watched the event unfold over the messaging service Skype.

“I started crying and shaking,” Alissa Talton recalled. “I was so excited.”

She joined city officials and Habitat for Humanity of East King County representatives June 11 to break ground for the new development, five duplexes that will house 10 families. The late afternoon groundbreaking was ceremonial; volunteers will start construction at the site next month.

Tom Granger, executive director of the local Habitat branch, lauded city officials and highlands developer Port Blakely Communities for supporting the project. Habitat purchased the land with help from the city, Port Blakely and A Regional Coalition for Housing, an organization of Eastside cities and King County that works to increase the supply of affordable housing. Read more

Good Samaritan helps police find purse snatcher

June 16, 2009

By Warren Kagarise
A Preston woman said a good Samaritan helped police officers track down a man who snatched her purse in a grocery store parking lot.
Dianne Harbolt was loading groceries into her car at Safeway, 735 N.W. Gilman Blvd., last week. At about 7 p.m. June 11, she said a man drove by in a Chevrolet pickup and grabbed her purse from her shopping cart. Harbolt said the truck came within a few inches of her and her 9-year-old daughter as the suspect fled.
“I could have reached out and touched the truck,” Harbolt said.
As the suspect sped away, a teenager driving a gold car pulled up and told Harbolt he would track down the purse thief.
“‘I’ll get him,’” Harbolt said he told her. “‘Stay put. I’ve got him.’”
Bystanders gathered and called police. Harbolt had no mobile phone of her own; it was in her purse.
“I think about 100 people called 911 on my behalf,” she said.
As an officer interviewed Harbolt, he received a call alerting him that another officer and the good Samaritan had located the suspect. He asked Harbolt to wait at Safeway while he headed to the scene.
Harbolt thanked other patrons for waiting with her and allowing her to use a mobile phone, so she could call her other daughter.
“This sounds corny, but it restored my faith in humanity,” Harbolt said.
Officers arrested the suspect, a 20-year-old Maple Valley man, near Third Avenue Northeast and Northeast Dogwood Street.
Police returned Harbolt’s purse and she identified the suspect. She said it looked as though the suspect hadn’t had enough time to go through her belongings.
Though Harbolt had all of her items returned to her, one key detail from the case eluded her: She wanted to know the identity of the man who helped track down her purse and the suspect.
“The world needs more people like him,” Harbolt said.
Police released his name June 15. The good Samaritan was 17-year-old Jonathan Wallis, of Issaquah.

A Preston woman said a good Samaritan helped police officers track down a man who snatched her purse in a grocery store parking lot. Read more

Issaquah schools get recognition from state audit

June 16, 2009

By Chantelle Lusebrink
For the seventh year in a row, Issaquah School District officials received recognition from the State Auditor’s Office for completely adhering to state and federal regulations.
“I think the audit came out well,” said Jacob Kuper, chief executive of finance and operations for the district. “Anytime we have a clean audit with no findings, it is good news for the district and the taxpayers as well.”
District officials received state Auditor’s Office officials’ findings in May. The audit looked at financial accountings from Sept. 1, 2007, to Aug. 31, 2008.
The audits are a routine inspection conducted by the State Auditor’s Office every year for every public entity.
“Anytime an outside party holds us to a standard, federal, state and local standards, it is a good thing,” Kuper said. “It helps ensure the property systems are in place for compliance.”
The audits measure general accountability and look at the district’s protection and safeguarding of public resources. It included cash receipting and revenues, payroll expenditures and assessment of fines and damages. It also looked at expenditures and protection of assets, like laptops and classroom materials.
The accountability audit also looked into compliance with state and local regulations, such as conflict of interest laws, the Open Public Meetings Act, competitive bidding compliance, contracts, student enrollment and transportation reporting.
If there are findings by officials with the Auditor’s Office, district officials correct them, Kuper said.
The last time district officials received any correction from the Auditor’s Office was in a management letter in 2006 for the 2006-07 school year. That letter asked them to alter their reporting of certain district transportation routes. Those problems were corrected while auditors were still in the building.
Reach Reporter Chantelle Lusebrink at 392-6434, ext 241, or clusebrink@isspress.com. Comment on this story at www.issaquahpress.com.

For the seventh year in a row, Issaquah School District officials received recognition from the State Auditor’s Office for completely adhering to state and federal regulations. Read more

Newest math adoption raises questions

June 16, 2009

By Chantelle Lusebrink
Questions and concerns continue to surface as Issaquah School District officials forge ahead in their high school math adoption process.
Issaquah School Board members held a work-study session with the district’s Math Adoption Committee — a group of math teachers and curriculum specialists — to get a better idea of the process, which led to the recommendation of Discovering Mathematics, by Key Curriculum Press.
Teachers said that Discovering Mathematics allows them, and every teacher in the district regardless of school, the ability to use the textbook in a consistent, relevant way for children. The book includes practical application investigations, group work and teacher-directed learning.
“One thing I keep coming back to over the other book is the clear point of view the book has,” said Rochelle Eixenberger, a teacher at Issaquah High School. “It will create equity among classrooms in schools, but across the district as well. There are so many things and avenues to go down in the other book.
“After we go through professional development, there is the scaffolding for students and support for the teacher.”
The recommendation made by the committee is not the same as the recommendation made by the state Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. After a review of new math standards, set forth in July 2008, and new math curricula, state experts recommended Holt Mathematics.
However, this is the first time the state Superintendent’s Office has made a recommendation, a result of 2007 legislation.
“It is not the role of OSPI to direct which curricula a school district may or should select. It is not a state requirement for any district to specifically use the recommended curricula,” State Superintendent Randy Dorn said in a memorandum sent to districts May 4.
Issaquah School Board members thanked the math committee for its time, presentation and months of work. However, they had questions regarding whether a new curriculum was the right choice and what other options might be available.
The study session did little to ease parents’ minds about the recommended curriculum.
“As a practicing mathematician, I am appalled at the approach taken by the Issaquah School District in teaching math,” said Mark Van Horne, a Boeing Co. engineer and mathematician. “The notion that young students can somehow discover complex mathematical concepts, developed over centuries by mankind’s most gifted people … who devoted their entire lives to the development of mathematical knowledge, suggests to me the people making curriculum decisions for the Issaquah School District do not understand and do not fully appreciate the nature of mathematics.”
Van Horne continued by saying he perceived at least two problems in how the curriculum was selected: that the team making decisions was made up only of math educators and no practicing mathematician, and that math educators have limited knowledge of practical applications of math.
Several other parents spoke at the meeting. Some asked board members to halt the process, restart it with community input or keep the same math curriculum, but add support services for struggling students.
Next steps in the process include the final recommendation from the district’s Instructional Materials Committee, which analyzes the text for bias and readability, a state requirement. If that committee recommends Discovering Mathematics, it will appear before the board on the agenda at its July 8 meeting.
Before then, board members and district officials have tentatively scheduled another work-study session meant to bring state math experts and curriculum specialists in to discuss Holt Mathematics and Discovering Mathematics.
Community members, who specialize in and work with mathematics, may also be asked to attend that meeting and weigh in.
If school board members choose to adopt the curriculum, it would go into classrooms this fall.
If it isn’t adopted, the process is halted and College Prep Math would continue to be used in the district. However, board members could also ask for a new adoption process or new ideas.
The money for the new curriculum is reserved. However, district officials said that as they face tighter budgets, it could be hard to reserve that funding later.
Reach Reporter Chantelle Lusebrink at 392-6434, ext. 241, or clusebrink@isspress.com.  Comment on this article at www.issaquahpress.com.

Questions and concerns continue to surface as Issaquah School District officials forge ahead in their high school math adoption process. Read more

Issaquah students could get a free ride to college

June 16, 2009

By Laura Geggel
College tuition may seem out of reach for many families as the economy continues its slump and state universities raise their rates.
But college is within reach — even free — to some students who meet requirements.
After hearing the 2006 Washington Learns report, the state Legislature agreed to implement the report’s recommendation of making college more accessible to students of low-income families. In 2007, the state Legislature allotted $7.4 million to fund the College Bound Scholarship Program, which will begin in 2012 and last until 2014.
Issaquah seventh-, eighth- and ninth-grade students can apply for the program now and receive the money once they are of college age.
The program is aimed at helping children of low-income families. Students who are on the free or reduced-price lunch program or whose families’ incomes are 65 percent or less of the state’s median annual family income of $47,000 qualify for the program.
Foster children also qualify, as well as home-schooled and private school children who fit the requirements.
There are only two stipulations students must adhere to before receiving money: maintain a 2.0 grade point average and not commit a crime.
Students who sign up for the award will receive four years of tuition to a state school and a $500 annual stipend for books.
Only 83 of the possible 306 eligible Issaquah seventh-, eighth- and ninth-graders have applied for the scholarship in the past two years.
Eighth- and ninth- graders must apply by June 30 for the scholarship this year, as they won’t be eligible to enroll next year. However, seventh-graders have until June 30, 2010, to apply.
“The College Bound Scholarship Program is a wonderful opportunity for students who are from low-income families to gain access to higher education,” said Bob Burdick, director of public relations at the Higher Education Coordinating Board.
The scholarship applies to two- and four-year universities and vocational programs.
“Not everyone wants a four-year degree,” Burdick said.
Learn more by calling 1-888-535-0747 toll-free or e-mailing collegebound@hecb.wa.gov. Students who want to learn more about financial aid but do not qualify for the College Bound Scholarship Program can find resources at http://www.hecb.wa.gov/paying.

College tuition may seem out of reach for many families as the economy continues its slump and state universities raise their rates. Read more

Two crashes snarl Issaquah-Hobart Road traffic

June 16, 2009

By Warren Kagarise
Several vehicles were damaged in two crashes in the 10100 block of northbound Issaquah-Hobart Road June 12, briefly slowing traffic on the corridor ahead of the afternoon commute. No injuries were reported in the accidents, which occurred within moments of one another at about 2:30 p.m.
Drivers said the first chain-reaction crash began when the driver of a truck leading a column of vehicles slowed down, causing other drivers to slam on their brakes. All told, six vehicles were involved — three in each crash.
Marah Weiler, 18, was behind the wheel of a beige Toyota Camry, headed home to Issaquah. She said the driver of the truck in front of her slowed suddenly. Weiler hit her brakes; her vehicle tapped the truck. Weiler said the truck then left. A red Honda Civic slammed into the Camry’s rear bumper.
Shaken, Weiler called her mother, Marné, after the crash.
“I could tell she was afraid,” Marné Weiler said at the accident scene. Her daughter and a friend riding in the vehicle waited in the grass alongside the road.
Issaquah Police officers responded to the accident at about 2:30 p.m. Officer Ron Adams said the first accident was not considered a hit and run.
“We’re not taking this as a hit and run, because the person who did the hitting is here,” he said.
Adams said the two accidents were likely connected. Drivers slowed to maneuver around the first accident and then caused the second crash.
Stasi Samsonov was driving north in her maroon Honda CR-V when her vehicle was rear-ended in the second crash.
“I was on my way to work,” she said. “I didn’t expect this to happen.”
After the accident, Samsonov headed to an auto body shop for repair estimates. Her sport utility vehicle was damaged but drivable.
“I’m going to be sore tomorrow,” Samsonov added. “That’s for sure.”
The accidents occurred within sight of a memorial to accident victim Christopher M. Leslie. The 27-year-old Issaquah man died June 5 when his sport-utility vehicle veered off the road and rolled several times. Leslie died at the scene from head injuries.
Reach Reporter Warren Kagarise at 392-6434, ext. 234, or wkagarise@isspress.com. Comment on this story at www.issaquahpress.com.

Several vehicles were damaged in two crashes in the 10100 block of northbound Issaquah-Hobart Road June 12, briefly slowing traffic on the corridor ahead of the afternoon commute. No injuries were reported in the accidents, which occurred within moments of one another at about 2:30 p.m. Read more

To The Editor

June 16, 2009

Surviving school
Transition to high school rife           with harmful experimentation
As a 14-year-old, I have looked upon the lives of many teens stumbling to find their way through to high school. Although I am young, I have witnessed much more than you may realize.
In a middle school as safe as mine, I am still surrounded by smokers, druggies and kids who have sex after school. Even with our health teachers telling us how harmful these acts may be and trying every way possible to prevent us from performing them, it is still no use.
It is difficult to understand why teens do these things. Stress? Friends? Family? As a child, I can see where these kids are coming from, but why they would turn to such things, I could never imagine. Talking and encouraging kids only goes so far, as teens my age find it hard to talk about what they are feeling. This often causes depression, and possible suicide.
This problem can never be fully solved, but it can be helped. Teens need to feel like they can talk and not keep it bottled up inside. They should not feel embarrassed, scared or ashamed to let it all out.
If you are a parent, let your child know he or she can always come to you for help. If you have a friend who is smoking, doing drugs, or generally depressed let them know that you’re there to help them and encourage them to talk to a trusted adult and if they are not comfortable doing that, to call a help hotline. It could save a life.
Kylie Boyd
Issaquah
Relay For Life
Thank you to all who helped make this year’s event a successful fundraiser
Thank you to those who supported this year’s Relay For Life.
The 2009 American Cancer Society Relay For Life of Issaquah was a spectacular event for close to 1,000 Issaquah and Sammamish residents, largely in part to members of our community.
Several local businesses stepped up to sponsor this year’s relay by providing publicity, on-site event support and entertainment, logistical assistance and more. Gold sponsors included Overlake Hospital Medical Center, The Issaquah Press and Action Entertainment. Silver sponsors included the Issaquah School District, KPMG and the Kiwanis of Issaquah. Bronze sponsors included Pogacha of Issaquah, Foot Zone of the Eastside, Domino’s Pizza and the Issaquah/Sammamish Reporter.
In addition to our fantastic sponsors, several volunteers helped make the 2009 Relay For Life a success. Thank you to the amazing volunteers from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for your assistance in setting up for the event. Thank you to the ladies of Pure Indulgence Hair Design for your efforts at the cutathon.
And, saving the best for last — thank you for this year’s team captains and our participants for your fundraising efforts and for making this year’s relay so much fun. Thank you to each member of the 2009 planning team for the time and energy that you have put forth during the relay season to plan and prepare for our event, as well as your contributions during the event itself.
Together, we have made a difference through our contributions to the American Cancer Society. Together, we have made an impact on the fight against cancer. See you on the track in 2010!
Karen Conley and Stacy Strickland
2009 Relay For Life event co-chairs
Panther Passage
Thank to the Issaquah community for supporting transition program
We would like to thank the volunteers who came out in force to support Issaquah Middle School’s Panther Passage (formerly Spring Forum).
Panther Passage is a tradition at IMS that provides our eighth-graders the opportunity to present a portfolio of their middle school accomplishments to a panel of community validators. The students’ reflections on their growth and development provide a springboard from IMS to the ninth-grade campus and high school. The eighth-graders truly value the feedback they receive from members of the community.
Over the past few weeks, we have been joined by hundreds of volunteers from the Issaquah School District, IMS and feeder elementary school families, city of Issaquah, business and service groups, and retired Issaquah teachers. It has been truly gratifying to see how this community came together for our eighth-graders.
In addition, the teaching, administrative and custodial staffs at IMS were invaluable in helping ensure that Panther Passage went smoothly. We could not have done this without all of you! We so appreciate your time and talent!
Congratulations to all of the graduating IMS eighth-graders. We wish them much success as they move on to the ninth-grade campus.
Susan Meyer and Vicki Hahn
2009 Panther Passage co-chairs
Memorial Day
Army’s Freedom Team Salute program honors local soldiers and their families
Another Memorial Day, a time to remember all military veterans, has passed. I note almost daily as I read through the obituaries the number of veterans who are leaving us. There seems to be more lately.
I would like to remind Issaquah Press readers that I continue to be a volunteer ambassador for the U.S. Army’s Freedom Team Salute program. This is a free outreach program to thank all U.S. Army veterans for their service to our country. Let’s honor the Army veterans in our lives now while we still can.
Army veterans will receive an official commendation package from the Secretary of the Army and Army Chief of Staff that includes a personalized letter of thanks and certificate of appreciation, an Army lapel pin and two U.S. Army decals
All I need is the name of the honorably discharged Army veteran (active, Army Guard or Army Reserve) and address. You may also include rank if known, but it is not required. Please send the information to my e-mail address at Arthur.Farash@us.army.mil. Or, if you prefer, call me at 888-6518. You can also go to www.freedomteamsalute.com to honor your Army veteran today. This free commendation package will arrive within three to four weeks.
Let’s thank our U.S. Army veterans now while we can.
Art Farash, chief warrant officer 3, retired
U.S. Army Freedom Team Salute volunteer ambassador, North Bend

Surviving school

Transition to high school rife   with harmful experimentation Read more

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