Arts calendar

June 23, 2009

JUNE

25th

Brian Detlefs performs from 7-9 p.m. at Grimaldi’s Coffee House, 317 Gilman Blvd., Suite 47. Call 427-8161. Read more

City considers ban on Styrofoam

June 23, 2009

By Warren Kagarise
Stop by XXX Rootbeer Drive-in for a to-go root beer, and the signature drink will be served in a plastic foam cup — for now. Employees at the drive-in and many other Issaquah restaurants could be forced to swap Styrofoam and other polystyrene containers for eco-friendly materials.
Drive-in owner Jose Enciso said his restaurant uses polystyrene products because they cost less than alternatives. As the City Council considers a ban on Styrofoam to-go boxes and other food containers made from eco-unfriendly polystyrene, Enciso and other business leaders said the ban could mean higher prices on the menu.
But Enciso said he was comfortable with the switch for environmental reasons.
“Whatever it takes to help out the environment,” he said. “We’re ready.”
A proposed ban would outlaw polystyrene food packaging — a measure that would impact restaurants like XXX, grocers and other food sellers. Critics said the material lingers in landfills long after Styrofoam trays and cups are tossed into the trash. Polystyrene is expensive to recycle, too.
Councilman Joshua Schaer modeled the legislation on polystyrene bans in Seattle, Portland and several California cities.
“There may be a little resistance now, but I’m sure — given the success of this in much, much larger cities than Issaquah — it seems to me that we can move in the right direction,” he said.
Schaer and other Council Sustainability Committee members met June 16 to discuss the proposed ban.
Officials have questions about safe alternatives to polystyrene and how the ban would impact restaurants already grappling with consumers dining out less in the down economy.
“You know, these packages are used to serve takeout or in restaurants, and they typically last for a few minutes in terms of any use,” Schaer said. “The reality is, while we may only see them for a few minutes, the landfill and the environment sees them for tens of thousands of years.”
Even Schaer acknowledged not all compostable and recyclable alternatives are as durable as polystyrene. Schaer, a lawyer, works at a firm in downtown Seattle. He recalled buying lunch at a Pakistani restaurant near his office soon after the Seattle ban went into effect.
“They were using a corn-based container that was extremely hot and the curry was starting to melt through the bottom of it,” Schaer said. “That went on for a few weeks and I think people started complaining to the owner, because he’s at the counter all the time. You know, they made a switch.”
Schaer said the new container type survived the several-block walk to his office.
Though the draft ordinance declared the ban would be effective Jan. 1, officials said a ban — if approved — would go into effect much later. Sustainability Committee members will review the measure again next month.
Josh McDonald, government affairs coordinator for the Washington Restaurant Association, said restaurateurs would need time to prepare. He said they are also reluctant to use compostable and recyclable alternatives, because polystyrene is cheaper. In turn, restaurateurs would pass the cost along to diners.
“Anytime you take steps to increase costs, it has a negative effect on us,” McDonald said. “That said, a lot of our restaurants, a lot of our folks, are voluntarily moving in this direction and doing what they can and doing their part to move toward more sustainable [practices].”
City Resource Conservation Office Manager David Fujimoto said his staff planned for education and outreach efforts if the City Council bans polystyrene packaging. Fujimoto said 131 of the 800 or so businesses in Issaquah serve or sell food — 42 fast food outlets, 61 full-service restaurants and 28 stores.
Holly Chisa, Washington lobbyist for the Northwest Grocery Association, said her organization was working with more than 100 stores impacted by the Seattle ban to find products to meet the criteria outlined in the city’s ordinance.
Seattle officials outlawed polystyrene food containers last year. The ban took effect in January; next year, it will expand to include plastic containers and utensils.
Chisa said her No. 1 concern was the polystyrene trays used to package raw meat. Trays made from cardboard, and sugar and corn derivatives pose challenges. For instance, blood and other liquids seep through cardboard, while sugar and corn products could provide food sources for harmful bacteria.
“For a grocery store, the single most paramount concern we have is food safety,” Chisa said.
Products like prepackaged soups would already be exempt from the proposed ban. Schaer and other committee members did not rule out additional exemptions to the ordinance.
“For instance, if you said, ‘Hey, we own this business in Issaquah and there are simply no compostable or recyclable lids that we can use that are safe for our customers,’ then the city would take a look at that,” Schaer said.
Greater Issaquah Chamber of Commerce CEO Matt Bott talked with Issaquah restaurateurs before the meeting. Bott said reactions to the proposed ban were mixed. He said officials should seek input from business and restaurant owners as they rework the ordinance.
“We would just ask for some time to get the word out, to get input and then come back with something that would hopefully be of value to this community,” Bott said.
Besides food safety, industry lobbyists raised concerns about whether alternative materials could hold up to hot food. Chisa echoed Schaer when she said some compostable and recyclable containers are not as tough as the real deal.
“Soup will break down that container faster than anything I’ve ever seen,” she said.
Reach Reporter Warren Kagarise at 392-6434, ext. 234, or wkagarise@isspress.com. Comment on this story at www.issaquahpress.com.
Jose Enciso Jr. fills Styrofoam cups at XXX Rootbeer in Issaquah. By Adam Eschbach

Jose Enciso Jr. fills Styrofoam cups at XXX Rootbeer in Issaquah. By Adam Eschbach

Stop by XXX Rootbeer Drive-in for a to-go root beer, and the signature drink will be served in a plastic foam cup — for now. Employees at the drive-in and many other Issaquah restaurants could be forced to swap Styrofoam and other polystyrene containers for eco-friendly materials.

Drive-in owner Jose Enciso said his restaurant uses polystyrene products because they cost less than alternatives. As the City Council considers a ban on Styrofoam to-go boxes and other food containers made from eco-unfriendly polystyrene, Enciso and other business leaders said the ban could mean higher prices on the menu.

But Enciso said he was comfortable with the switch for environmental reasons. Read more

Issaquah Silver wins Battle of Bothell

June 23, 2009

Nate Bean (8), Issaquah Purple midfielder, drives the ball against Puyallup, in one of the Battle of Bothell tournament games that got them into the finals against the Lake Oswego, Ore., lacrosse team. By Charles Mauzy / Issaquah Youth Lacrosse

Nate Bean (8), Issaquah Purple midfielder, drives the ball against Puyallup, in one of the Battle of Bothell tournament games that got them into the finals against the Lake Oswego, Ore., lacrosse team. By Charles Mauzy / Issaquah Youth Lacrosse

They didn’t have it in the bag, but going into last weekend’s Battle of Bothell, the Issaquah Silver fifth- and sixth-grade lacrosse team was confident about its chances of winning the tournament championship.

The boys, from Issaquah and Sammamish, had won it in 2008 and looked to capitalize on their experience and disciplined conditioning. They did, and after easily winning the first few rounds on the waterlogged North Creek playfields, Issaquah Silver outshot and outhustled Beaverton, Ore., in a 7-3 championship victory.

“In the early rounds, it was pretty easy, but it started getting a little harder. In the championship round, it was pretty tough,” said standout attackman Jordan Greenhall. “Beaverton, they had a couple of really strong middies that were really good.”

The annual Battle of Bothell tournament featured 62 teams from the Northwest, including dozens of local teams and some from Oregon and Canada, with players ranging from fifth to 11th grades. Parents and players gathered at the playfields June 19-21 to enjoy a weekend of lacrosse.

In the end, the teams had played 107 games combined, said tournament coordinator Stan Kosick. It was the first year Battle of Bothell had rain. Read more

Today’s PTSAs fund more than playgrounds

June 23, 2009

Books are set out for students at Maple Hills Elementary School in April that were purchased by the PTSA for the Eager Reader program, an incentive reading program that students do at home. By Chantelle Lusebrink

Books are set out for students at Maple Hills Elementary School in April that were purchased by the PTSA for the Eager Reader program, an incentive reading program that students do at home. By Chantelle Lusebrink

In a time when education funding is uncertain, parent teacher associations do more than provide an extra set of swings on school playgrounds.

In fact, local PTSAs have provided $592,542 to the Issaquah School District between March 2008 and April 2009.

“Basically, it expands the reach of what happens day to day, but also supplements the instruction in the classroom,” said Nancy Campi, co-council president of the districtwide PTSA. “Unfortunately, now what we are doing is filling in the huge funding gap of money that isn’t being paid by the state for basics, like expanded hours, basic supplies and professional development.”

In the face of a $5.4 million budget gap, district officials have already had to increase class sizes by one child in each classroom in kindergarten through 12th grades. They’ve also reduced other operational costs by about $2.2 million. The cuts are making district officials realize PTSA funding is more crucial than ever and they are beginning to collect data on it. Read more

Issaquah woman dies in head-on I-90 crash

June 23, 2009

A 39-year-old Issaquah woman was killed June 12 in a head-on collision on Interstate 90 east of North Bend. Five men in another vehicle sustained life-threatening injuries in the crash. Read more

Angela L. Malmassari

June 23, 2009

Does your nonprofit agency or civic club need volunteers? Call 392-6434, ext. 237, or e-mail newsclerk@isspress.com.
Issaquah History Museums’ Train Depot and Gilman Town Hall: Be a docent four hours a month or more — volunteer@issaquahhistory.org or 392-3500
Green Redmond Partnership — restoration project, 9 a.m. – noon June 27, Idylwood Beach Park, 3650 W. Lake Sammamish Parkway. Call 206-905-6943.
The Tavon Center: Work the gardens and/or assist with clients — 999-2269
Life Enrichment Options (LEO): Help needed at its 20-year celebration/fundraiser Raise Our Roof. Go to www.leoorganization.org and click on “volunteers.”
Providence Marianwood Auxiliary: Staff the Gift Nook monitoring gift items and the cash box, and making and tallying sales — 391-2895
DownTown Issaquah Association: Host the DIA info booth at the Hailstone Feed Store; provide event/activity assistance and set up/tear down at ArtWalk Issaquah, Music on the Streets, Salmon Days, Halloween Hoopla and Holiday De-Lights — 445-1174
Cascade Land Conservancy: Help at a work party in your community, as a volunteer at one of its offices or help at a regional special event.  — e-mail volunteer@cascadeland.org.
Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank: Get groceries, sort and repackage donations and serve clients from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday and from 8 a.m. – noon Mondays and Fridays — 392-4123
Pampered Hands Group: At Providence Marianwood, assisting with soaking and massaging hands; individuals or teams from 10:15-11:45 a.m. Sunday to help with worship services — 391-2827
Cougar Mountain Zoo: General assistance with wildlife education and conservation — 392-6278
Faith in Action: Transportation, home services and/or social support services for Issaquah/Sammamish seniors — 369-9120
Issaquah Alps Trails Club: Volunteer for trail restoration. Work is typically done twice a week, weather permitting — 369-1725 before 7 p.m.
American Cancer Society: Serve on several fundraiser committee positions, — stacy_strickland@yahoo.com or 369-2195
King County Library System: Study Zone tutors for all sites, but particularly at the Fairwood, White Center, Skyway, Snoqualmie and Foster libraries — 369-3312 or aholloma@kcls.org
Eastside Baby Corner: Sort donations of clothing and toys from 7-8:30 p.m. Monday, from 9-11 a.m. Thursday and from 9 a.m. – noon Saturday — www.babycorner.org
AtWork!: Answer phones, greet visitors and perform general office duties anytime from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. Monday-Friday — 274-4000
King County Library System’s Words on Wheels Program: Deliver library materials to homebound patrons — 369-3235
Senior Services Volunteer Transportation Program: Drivers take Issaquah and Sammamish seniors to medical appointments — 206-448-5740
Friends of the Issaquah Library: Book Shelf Program distributes books to Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank patrons, especially from 10 a.m. – noon Tuesday and Wednesday — 432-3571 or fletcherann@msn.com
Hopelink: “Bus buddies” — 943-6769 or busbuddy@hope-link.org
Issaquah Chamber of Commerce: Visitor Information Center from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Saturdays — 392-7024
Stream Team: Help monitor Issaquah Creek’s water quality. Training is from 6-8 p.m. March 25 at City Hall Northwest, 1775 12th Ave. N.W. Call 837-3420.   Elder and Adult Day Services in Issaquah: From 10 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. Monday-Friday to assist with lunch duties, clerical duties, arts/crafts/animal therapy and other activities — 206-859-5721
Issaquah Valley Senior Center: Lunch program on Tuesday and Friday, serving in the dining room and washing dishes; also lunch and grocery runs — 392-2381
Providence Marianwood: Assist residents in groups, such as crafts, gardening, cooking, exercise and many others. Day, after school and evening opportunities are available — 391-2827
Eager Eye Guide Pups Club: Raise puppies for use as guide dogs for the blind — 644-7421
Community garden groups are needed to adopt garden beds (provide seasonal maintenance), have a teamwork party and join a group of gardeners who work independently at Pickering Farm — 837-3442
Seattle Tilth: Three-six hours per month, usually weekdays, who have a flexible schedule and a car or truck to help with shopping and outreach volunteers three hours per weekend a month — 206-633-5045, ext. 2
Issaquah Special Populations Social Club: Assist with dances, movies, field trips and special events. For every three hours of volunteer service, a 30-day pass will be issued for use of the community center facilities and Julius Boehm Pool — www.ci.issaquah.wa.us
Angela Malmassari

Angela Malmassari

Angela L. Malmassari, of Issaquah, died at home June 18, 2009. She was 78. Read more

Fancy fenders fill Front Street

June 23, 2009

Thousands attend weekend car show

fenders-cars-frontst-200906‘Got Wood,’ said the car with the canoe on top. Not only were many of the cars at the event classics, but some had personal touches as well.

Dancing to the music on the street

June 23, 2009

 A youngster shows his appreciation of a live performance at Pedestrian Park by leaving a tip in the band’s drum case. File photos

A youngster shows his appreciation of a live performance at Pedestrian Park by leaving a tip in the band’s drum case. File photo

Six years ago, Michael Johnson took on the city Arts Commission’s task of transforming Issaquah into an arts destination. The resulting ArtWalk drew crowds to downtown Issaquah once a month. Live music at strategic locations along the route kept them refreshed on their journey.

The music proved to be so popular, Johnson decided to concentrate efforts on expanding into a musical arts destination during summer months. The street performances are Music on the Streets.

Now in its third year, the primary location to catch live entertainment is Pedestrian Park, the grassy knoll at the corner of Front Street and Sunset Way. A second location, Stage 195, is in front of the artbyfire gallery, located at 195 Front St. Read more

To The Editor

June 23, 2009

We recently asked our Rapid Responders some questions about topics in the news. Here’s what they had to say:

1. What suggestions do you have for alternatives to putting our garbage in landfills?

Buy less, want less, need less.

Bryan Weinstein, Issaquah

Recycling has made some progress in putting garbage in landfills. Shopping with our own carry out bags can address a significant amount of paper waste. Composting biodegradable refuse is also an excellent alternative. Read more

Workin’ on the Railroad

June 23, 2009

WindermereDepot20090619cWindermere employee Alan Berkwitt drills a set of holes to secure a new walking plank on top of a vintage caboose at the Issaquah Train Depot Museum. Photo by Adam Eschbach

« Previous PageNext Page »