Poplars will be replaced with dogwood, gingko trees

July 28, 2009

Jose Ramirez pulls down a poplar tree, one of many poplars that have been dying from canker disease, the rotting of the trees from the inside. Northwest Landscape Services will be cutting down the remaining poplars along Gilman Boulevard and Front Street this week to prevent limbs from crashing on cars and injuring bystanders.By Adam Eschbach

Jose Ramirez pulls down a poplar tree, one of many poplars that have been dying from canker disease, the rotting of the trees from the inside. Northwest Landscape Services will be cutting down the remaining poplars along Gilman Boulevard and Front Street this week to prevent limbs from crashing on cars and injuring bystanders.By Adam Eschbach

City crews will remove 25 poplars at the southwest corner of Front Street North and Northeast Gilman Boulevard next week and replace the aging trees with gingko and dogwood trees.

The poplars — planted in 1972 — usually live for about 35 years. As the trees age and become less healthy, they can pose safety issues. Ginkgos are expected to live for more than 100 years; dogwoods could live for more than 50 years.

City officials plan to hire a contractor to remove the poplars in small segments. The waste will then be recycled. Read more

Lakeside still alive at Legion state tournament

July 28, 2009

Lakeside Recovery’s Ryan Somers slides safely into second as the Bellevue Baseball Club second baseman waits for the throw July 23. By Christopher Huber

Lakeside Recovery’s Ryan Somers slides safely into second as the Bellevue Baseball Club second baseman waits for the throw July 23. By Christopher Huber

Lakeside Recovery’s Shawn Ellis would have scored from third anyway when Ryan Somers lined the ball to center field, but those celebrating in the dugout said they found relief in the fact that the diving centerfielder dropped the catch.

That play gave Somers an RBI single, but more importantly, it gave Lakeside a walk-off 4-3 victory against Yakima Valley Pepsi Pak July 26 in a 13-inning battle in the American Legion AAA Senior state tournament at Tacoma’s Heidelberg Park.

The stifling heat wasn’t enough to keep the boys of the Lakeside Recovery Senior Legion baseball club down in the first two rounds to send Yakima Valley into the losers bracket.

Lakeside advanced to the third round July 27 when it met the Kennewick Bandits. Read more

Tumblin’ tots roll through good times and bad

July 28, 2009

Gymnastics East is a home away from home for children, families

Gymnastics instructor Jen Cook works with 6-year-old Miya Nakata on the balance beam at Gymnastics East, an Issaquah institution for 30 years. By Adam Eschbach

Gymnastics instructor Jen Cook works with 6-year-old Miya Nakata on the balance beam at Gymnastics East, an Issaquah institution for 30 years. By Adam Eschbach

Tumbling and flipping through good times is something Gymnastics East families are used to, but when the vaulting gets tough, they stick the landing by sticking together.

“We’re a family,” said Roberta Diles, gym co-owner, whose children began practicing there in the late 1980s.

Gymnastics East has been an Issaquah staple for 30 years, but recently reopened on Mall Street.
Their spring-loaded floors are more than a venue for learning to tumble or entering the realm of competitive gymnastics. Gymnastics East is home to generations of gymnasts who teach, participate and volunteer.

“It is a home away from home,” Diles said, adding her daughter Tamara also instructs at the gym.

Read more

IPD shares games, hot dogs, safety tips

July 28, 2009

Issaquah Police officers will celebrate the 26th annual National Night Out event. While they’re cooking free hot dogs, they need residents to come eat them. Read more

Coming soon: Issaquah schools’ alumni directory

July 28, 2009

Issaquah School District officials want to know where you are. Read more

Off The Press

July 28, 2009

Stories come full circle, whether we’re prepared or not. Today is an example of that. Former Issaquah School District teacher Linda Snyder, 59, lost her seven-year battle with ovarian cancer July 17.
It’s the last chapter of a story about a woman I greatly admired for her courage, kindness, faith and determination.
I met Linda two weeks into my job in 2006. The story was simple: Four fifth-graders reached within themselves to help a teacher who’d made a significant impact on them by donating their hair to Locks of Love and raising funds to help with her medical expenses.
Linda agreed to meet with me about that, but during the interview, the first question was asked by her. With the slightly authoritative air that only teachers have, she asked what angle I would pursue for a story. Her concern was that her students were reflected well.
From that moment, I knew exactly why her students were so determined to help.
After the story was done, I had lunch with her several times to check on her. She never liked that idea, so we met and talked about her two boys, Craig Thompson, 30, and Richard Thompson, 28, my life as a young reporter and my mother, who had health issues at the time.
“That was Linda,” said Alexis Davison, a longtime friend, colleague and teacher. “She was always helping other people and was a great listener.”
Though it had been some time since I had seen her, I learned in an e-mail that she had passed away. I was pleased to know the rest of her life had been full of joy, philanthropy, travel, friends and family.
“She spent a lot of time traveling,” Craig Thompson said. “All she could do was lay in the house and go to the doctor’s office. She loved to travel and it was a huge thing for her to look forward to.”
But traveling wasn’t easy.
She needed a wheelchair for herself, and another to wheel a virtual pharmacy and hospital along with her. Finally getting through security on their way to places like the Mexican Riviera, Acapulco, Hawaii, Colorado and California, gave the boys immense pleasure.
Aside from travel, Linda wanted to see her sons settle and become successful. In the past few years they found their path, which made her really proud, Davison said.
“Even in the darkest times, she’d sit and look for the positive and help us work through them,” Richard Thompson said. “That is how I continue to live for her, by keeping her philosophy.”
The community came together to celebrate that passion at her celebration of life service at Faith United Methodist Church July 21, followed by a picnic on Lake Washington.
Linda taught for 18 years in Kent, Texas, Montana, Utah and Germany. She came to Issaquah as a special-education teacher at Beaver Lake Middle School in 2000 and retired as a fourth-grade teacher at Cascade Ridge Elementary School in June 2008.
“She was a special person with an amazing passion,” Davison said. “She worked incredibly well with them. It takes a special person to work with special kids for 20 years.”
Her legacy continues there. Colleagues still use her Hopes and Dreams program, which interviews parents and students about their goals for the academic year. She also tutored students through last month.
Linda’s family has asked that donations be made to the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer at Swedish Hospital in her memory.
Her sister-in-law, Andrea Snyder, ran in honor of Linda at the center’s 10-kilometer race July 26.
“It was tough,” she said, adding she wore a T-shirt from one of Linda’s events and a bracelet her students had made for her. “I would think of how strong she was and that was the kind of strong I wanted. She did so much in the time she was here and touched so many people.”
Checks can for the center can be sent to Andrea Snyder at 9625 S.E. 71st St., Mercer Island, WA 98040. Make them out to the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research.
Reach Reporter Chantelle Lusebrink at 392-6434, ext. 241, or clusebrink@isspress.com. Comment on this story at www.issaquahpress.com.

Remembering a woman with gifts and passion

Chantelle Lusebrink Press Reporter

Chantelle Lusebrink Press Reporter

Stories come full circle, whether we’re prepared or not. Today is an example of that. Former Issaquah School District teacher Linda Snyder, 59, lost her seven-year battle with ovarian cancer July 17.

It’s the last chapter of a story about a woman I greatly admired for her courage, kindness, faith and determination.

I met Linda two weeks into my job in 2006. The story was simple: Four fifth-graders reached within themselves to help a teacher who’d made a significant impact on them by donating their hair to Locks of Love and raising funds to help with her medical expenses. Read more

Online parent survey evaluates school experience

July 28, 2009

Parents of elementary school students are being asked by school district officials to take a survey about their child’s school experiences before Aug. 8. Read more

Council taps brakes on undercrossing

July 28, 2009

City Council members yielded to environmental concerns last week and delayed a pact crucial to construction of the long-planned Interstate 90 Undercrossing. Read more

Public hearing set for shoreline regulations

July 28, 2009

Citizens and people who own property along Issaquah Creek and Lake Sammamish can make their voices heard about a key plan for lands next to waterways. Read more

Council kicks in city money to upgrade sports fields

July 28, 2009

Since Issaquah Youth Lacrosse was founded in early 2004, teams have played on fields in Bellevue and Sammamish — but not in the organization’s namesake city. Read more

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