Feast your eyes on this literary cookbook

August 11, 2009

literary-feast-book-2009070Ever wonder what dinner with your favorite author may be like?

Well, you may not dine with them, but you can cook what they’d cook for themselves, thanks to the King County Library Foundation’s new book, “Literary Feast: The Famous Authors Cookbook.”

“The uniqueness of it makes it a wonderful gift for readers, for cooks and for people interested in both,” said Jeanne Thorsen, foundation director. “I think it is something people will really enjoy and at the same time, help support literacy in our community, which people feel very strongly about.”

The book includes nearly 100 drink, food and dessert recipes from authors and includes 92 author profiles with their personal perspectives.

The book includes recipes from the kitchens of famous local authors, like Deb Caletti, who has five fiction novels based in and around Issaquah.

“It was just such an easy thing, because I’m the ultimate library lover. The library, to me, is my sanctuary and the King County Library System is a sanctuary, plus one of the best library systems in the country. How can you not want to support it?” Caletti said. “And I owe them forever for my endless usage. I spend more hours there than anywhere else, besides my home. If I’m lost, my family knows I’m in one of the libraries.”

Caletti included her favorite sugar cookie recipe, handed down from her grandmother, to her mother and to her.

“The recipe has been in my family for a long time,” she said. “It’s one of those that are stained and messy, because it’s always out. It’s also a dangerous recipe, because it has every bit of fat and sugar for those times when you need every bit of fat and sugar.”

The recipe calls for two types of sugar and plenty of butter, making it nearly a shortbread cookie, she added.

But the concoctions you can cook up don’t just come from local authors. See what nationally acclaimed authors, like J.A. Jance, David Baldacci, Peg Kehret and Nancy Leson, are cooking up in their kitchens, as well as local chef Tom Douglas, Dr. Arthur Agatston (author of the “South Beach Diet”) and Greg Atkinson, author of the “Atkinson Diet.”

“I was really pleased, one, with the number of authors who wanted to participate — in fact, we’re starting a file for volume No. 2 — but also that other than a cookbook with someone’s name and their favorite recipe, the book talks about the authors themselves and their recipes, which really personalizes it,” Thorsen said.

It’s an easy book to cook your way through, which is what one of the library’s employees is doing now, she said.

“I would have never imagined that a cookbook about top writers would be so illuminating and entertaining,” Terry LaBrue, project author and local writer, said in a press release. It “gave me a chance to peer over their shoulders and into their lives.”

The book costs $22.95, plus tax and shipping, but proceeds benefit programs sponsored by the library foundation, like an eight-week Spanish literature seminar series, Study Zone tutoring help, Global Reading Challenge and Summer Reading programs for students.

Get the book

Order ‘Literary Feast: The Famous Authors Cookbook’ through the King County Library System Foundation link at www.thrifbooks.com/kclsf or call 369-3448 to reserve a copy that you can pick up at the library’s service center, 960 Newport Way N.W.

Grandma-Mom’s Sugar Cookies

By Issaquah author Deb Caletti

Cream together:

1 cup powdered sugar

1 cup granulated sugar

1 cup butter

Add:

1 cup oil

2 eggs, beaten

2 teaspoons vanilla

5 cups flour

1 teaspoon soda

1 teaspoon cream of tartar

1/4 teaspoon salt

Roll into small balls. Press with cookie press or glass bottom   dipped in sugar.

Bake in a

350-degree oven

for 10-12 minutes.

Serves 1-12.

Get the book
Order ‘Literary Feast: The Famous Authors Cookbook’ through the King County Library System Foundation link at www.thrifbooks.com/kclsf or call 369-3448 to reserve a copy that you can pick up at the library’s service center, 960 Newport Way N.W.

Reach Reporter Chantelle Lusebrink at 392-6434, ext. 241, or clusebrink@isspress.com. Comment on this story at www.issaquahpress.com.

Wanted: New pool

August 11, 2009

Parks survey consistent

Issaquah residents are pleased with municipal parks, trails and the city-run farmers market. A survey conducted by the city Parks & Recreation Department showed residents happy with the state of the park system, and offered a glimpse at the features people want. Read more

Final Cougar trail run tests endurance with grueling hills

August 11, 2009

David Morgan (left) of Issaquah, and Andrew Lee, of Bellevue, carry an injured Tiffany Moreno, of Seattle, across the finish line Aug. 8. Moreno rolled her ankle about two miles into the 13.1-mile Cougar Mountain Trail Run.By Christopher Huber

David Morgan (left) of Issaquah, and Andrew Lee, of Bellevue, carry an injured Tiffany Moreno, of Seattle, across the finish line Aug. 8. Moreno rolled her ankle about two miles into the 13.1-mile Cougar Mountain Trail Run.By Christopher Huber

As runners crossed the finish line of the fourth and final Cougar Mountain Train Run, they joked that, after winning the 13.1-mile race, Uli Steidl might take off for another 13-mile jaunt through the woods just for fun.

Well, the Shoreline runner, who has won multiple Seattle marathons and run in various world-championship races, didn’t do another half-marathon on Cougar Mountain. But when he crossed the finish line Aug. 8, he simply glanced at his watch and stopped, not even out of breath, chatted with race organizers and took off for a 10-minute cool-down.

Steidl came in at 1 hour, 34 minutes and 16 seconds, about six minutes ahead of runner-up Chris Charles.

Steidl said he is preparing to race in Italy in September.

“I took this as more of a training run,” he said as he rested. “The time is not important. I just want to run strong on the up and down hills.”

Seattle resident Jeanine Stewart, the first-place female runner, came in at 2:03:12. Having won all four races, she ultimately won the series for the women with four points. Read more

Special-needs students graduate one step closer to independence

August 11, 2009

Hannah Gonzales, 3, of Issaquah, walks through a balloon arch at the Kindering Center graduation in Bellevue. The event helped her celebrate her accomplishments there, including being able to walk with the use of her walker. By Chantelle Lusebrink

Hannah Gonzales, 3, of Issaquah, walks through a balloon arch at the Kindering Center graduation in Bellevue. The event helped her celebrate her accomplishments there, including being able to walk with the use of her walker. By Chantelle Lusebrink

With heads held high, more than 370 graduates uneasily stepped forward and made their way through a colorful balloon arch at Bellevue’s Crossroads Park Aug. 6.

Standing at little more than three feet and no older than 3, Kindering Center graduates of the class of 2009 took their first steps toward a new future. The day marked more than just the start of new adventures, but reminded their parents of how far they’d come.

“We are very proud of Hannah,” her mother Melissa Gonzales said during the ceremony, referring to her daughter. “She works so hard.”

Born with a congenital brain condition, Hannah’s future was anything but clear. However, at eight months old, Hannah’s doctor referred Melissa and her husband, Dominic Gonzales, to Kindering Center for early intervention.

“I was impressed by their services and felt Hannah needed to be here, it’s definitely worth the drive” from Issaquah to Bellevue, Melissa Gonzales said.

Established in 1962, Kindering Center is a nonprofit neurodevelopmental center for special-needs children and their families. It is the only center of its kind on the Eastside and one of the largest in the nation, said Joe Cunningham, senior development officer for the center. Read more

Moroccan exchange students get firsthand look at America

August 11, 2009

Meryem Riane (left) and Loubna Gourari visit the Blue Door at City Hall. The door was donated by their hometown, Issaquah’s sister city, Chefchaouen, Morocco. The  girls visited as part of an exchange program.By Erin Kim

Meryem Riane (left) and Loubna Gourari visit the Blue Door at City Hall. The door was donated by their hometown, Issaquah’s sister city, Chefchaouen, Morocco. The girls visited as part of an exchange program.By Erin Kim

On their first visit to America, students Meryem Riane, 19, and Loubna Gourari, 18, traveled to Issaquah from its Moroccan sister city, Chefchaouen.

Long before the students made a two-week trip to Issaquah, Issaquah residents and officials took steps to cement the relationship between the city and Chefchaouen.

In 2006, 12-year-old Iman Belali wanted to create a better understanding between America and Morocco, her home country. Iman convinced her parents to start the nonprofit organization, the American Moroccan International Exchange program.

Issaquah residents then traveled to Morocco through AMIE.

After the trip’s success, the City Council established a sister-city relationship with Chefchaouen as an outgrowth of Iman’s request. Read more

Eugene Adolph Rothleutner

August 11, 2009

Eugene Rothleutner

Eugene Rothleutner

Eugene Adolph Rothleutner, formerly of Issaquah, died Aug. 1, 2009, in Marysville. He was 70. Read more

Arthur Lamar Olson

August 11, 2009

death-olson,arthur-20090800Art “Papa” Olson died peacefully July 26, 2009. He was 79. Read more

Eagle scores perfect hat trick

August 11, 2009

Issaquah junior midfielder Quinn Grisham, leaps up to plant his head on the soccer ball during an April match against Eastlake. File

Issaquah junior midfielder Quinn Grisham, leaps up to plant his head on the soccer ball during an April match against Eastlake. File

In soccer, a “perfect hat trick” is no easy feat. It means that a player scores three goals, one with his head, one with his right foot, and one with his left. Quinn Grisham scored a hat trick in the Issaquah High School Eagles’ qualifying game for the state tournament.

The perfect hat trick is a reflection of Grisham’s triple- threat soccer skills: He is a strong leader, has an eye for scoring goals and is a team player on the field.

The Issaquah Eagles soccer team had a phenomenal 2009 season. They had more wins this year than any other in the history of the program, and the team made it to the state tournament for the first time ever.

“We decided this year we weren’t going to underachieve,” said Grisham, an incoming senior. “We took it a lot more seriously. We set high goals: winning in our league, and making it to state, which we met.” Read more

Pamper the pets when designing the perfect interior

August 11, 2009

A pet’s color scheme can actually play into a room’s overall design, as well as its fur, be it long haired or short. ARA Content

A pet’s color scheme can actually play into a room’s overall design, as well as its fur, be it long haired or short. ARA Content

For most people, a lot of thought goes into designing the perfect home with just the right amount of creature comforts. What can get overlooked in the process are the comforts of four-legged creatures, namely pets.

According to the American Pet Products Association, 63 percent of all households in the United States have a pet, and of those, dogs and cats make up 82 percent of all pets.

So when finding cost-effective ways to re-design the interior of your home, don’t forget to keep in mind the effect the design will have on the family pet. From furniture and flooring to paint and accessories, everything can have its place to accommodate Fido and Fluffy. Read more

Maple Street hotel planned

August 11, 2009

Developers are seeking a permit to build a five-story, 143,700-square-foot SpringHill Suites by Marriott hotel and two levels of above-grade parking on a 1.6-acre site south of Northwest Maple Street and east of 12th Avenue Northwest. The hotel would include 145 rooms and parking for 203 vehicles. A parking lot on the site would be demolished for the hotel. Read more

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