Poo Poo Point: A destination to enjoy the view

September 1, 2009

Downtown Issaquah and Lake Sammamish are easily visible in the valley behind a foxglove flower from near the top of the Chirico Trail hike to Poo Poo Point on Tiger Mountain. By Christopher Huber

Downtown Issaquah and Lake Sammamish are easily visible in the valley behind a foxglove flower from near the top of the Chirico Trail hike to Poo Poo Point on Tiger Mountain. By Christopher Huber

Take a Hike

An occasional seriesabout exploring the area’s trails

Even on an overcast day, the views from Poo Poo Point are magnificent. Although it sits at less than 2,000 feet above sea-level, the popular hang gliding and parasail launching point offers sweeping views of Issaquah, Maple Valley, Lake Sammamish, Mount Rainier and even Mount Baker.

Located at the western end of Tiger Mountain, the trail itself is much nicer than the destination’s name implies — Poo Poo Point is named after the sounds trains made while traveling along nearby railroads, according to SummitPost.org.

The trail is known for it’s easy access, relatively steep grades and popularity among parasailers. But anyone in decent physical condition with two to four hours on his or her hands should consider taking a jaunt on this trail, which ends at the north launch site.

The distance to the hang glider take-off varies depending on where you start, but the seemingly better-used part — the three-mile round-trip Chirico Trail — starts at the landing field, off of Issaquah-Hobart Road. Eager hikers with a full day should try the approximately seven-and-a-half-mile trail from Issaquah High School.

The Chirico Trail is well maintained and accessible virtually year-round. Hikers will get a good workout traversing a handful of steep switchbacks and a few fallen trees along the way. Elevation gain is about 1,500 feet in the one-and-a-half-mile (one way) trip. Read more

College News

September 1, 2009

‘Issaquah resident Earns Scholarship from WWU Read more

Librarian wins romance award

September 1, 2009

Deborah Schneider

Deborah Schneider

Deborah Schneider just got swept off her feet with a romance award from the Romance Writers of America.

The budding romance author’s day job as the public programming coordinator in Issaquah for the King County Library System allows her to schedule free literary events for the public. Her fellow writers in the Romance Writers of America’s Greater Seattle chapter recognized her contributions and nominated her for the award. After the board of directors at the Romance Writers of America sifted through nominations from across the country, they selected Schneider as the recipient. Read more

EFR considers layoffs

September 1, 2009

Dire financial times have Eastside Fire & Rescue officials openly considering laying off firefighters, although they consider that scenario unlikely. Read more

Skyline students snorkel for science

September 1, 2009

Allen Suner, of Skyline High School, places a point intercept quadrant over a section of coral reef to take field measurements in June off the island of San Salvador in the Bahamas.

Allen Suner, of Skyline High School, places a point intercept quadrant over a section of coral reef to take field measurements in June off the island of San Salvador in the Bahamas.

Teens help research reefs in Bahamas

Seventeen current and former Skyline High School students did more than tan on a beach on the island of San Salvador in the Bahamas this summer — they snorkeled in the name of science.

While it may sound like fun and games, the students and their three chaperones put their noses in the water for hours on end to conduct scientific research with the Earth Watch Institute on one of the largest coral reefs in the world.

Though Gretel von Bargen, an International Baccalaureate biology teacher at Skyline, has been traveling the world, participating in projects with Earth Watch Institute for years, it is the first time she brought students along, she said.

“When I was in high school, I traveled with a teacher and that made such an impression on me. I always felt I should return the favor,” she said. “But I also really like my students. Well, I love my students and I love biology. It’s a way to combine the things I love.”

The project was started 17 years ago by research scientists John Rollino; Dr. Garriet Smith, of the University of South Carolina at Aiken; and Thomas McGrath, a professor at Corning Community College in New York, to monitor the health of the coral reef.

“It was an incredible opportunity,” said graduate Jameson Gardner. “We saw what new species can do to an area. There is a whole world down there and if we lose it, a lot of the natural marine life is gone.” Read more

Love at first sight now into its 60th year for the Mobleys

September 1, 2009

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Arlene and David Mobley in 2009

It was love at first sight when David Mobley saw Arlene Richardson hustle down the stairs of a Portland Montgomery Ward building.

“I was eating lunch with another guy in the cafeteria and she came down those stairs the way she always did, and I told him she was the girl I was going to marry,” he said.

The couple, who have lived in Mirrormont since 1966, will celebrate their 60th anniversary Sept. 5 with friends and family.

“I can’t imagine life without my wife,” he added. “She is a part of me.”

“We’re like bread and butter,” she said.

“Whose the butter?” David asked.

“I am,” she said, smiling.

While David, 79, knew his future from the start, Arlene, 77, said she needed a bit of convincing. Read more

Football teams ready for long playoff drive

September 1, 2009

Trey Wheeler, Liberty quarterback, runs for a first down against Ballard in 2008. By Greg Farrar

Trey Wheeler, Liberty quarterback, runs for a first down against Ballard in 2008. By Greg Farrar

A year ago, all three Issaquah School District high school football teams opened the season with victories. It was just a sign of good things to come for Liberty, Issaquah and Skyline.

All three eventually qualified for state playoffs, a rare accomplishment for any school district in the state.

Skyline ended up winning the 4A state title, Issaquah took second and Liberty reached the 3A quarterfinals before falling to eventual state champion Bellevue.

All three teams open the season this week and the expectations haven’t changed — all are aiming for the playoffs again. Read more

The pinks are running

September 1, 2009

Dallas Cross

Dallas Cross

Fish Journal

I have been asked several times where to fish if one does not have access to a boat.

The answer has just arrived in Puget Sound. The pinks are in and ready to run up virtually every river emptying into the sound.

Pink is a nickname for the salmon that arrive in August to spawn in our rivers every odd-numbered year. They are commonly known as pink or humpy salmon. They are the most numerous salmon in North Pacific waters and American rivers, mainly spawning from Alaska to the Columbia River.

They are called pinks because their flesh is much lighter and pink in color. Their nickname has a double meaning, because to catch them you can’t go wrong using pink flies and lures.

Pinks hang out in shallow saltwater and close to shore, especially during their migration back to the river where they hatched. This means you can fish for them from many shores with a public access. With a fly rod, be prepared to wade out to cast a No. 4 or 6, pink or chartreuse fly with flashy tinsel strips about as far as you can throw; or with a spinning rod you may stay relatively dry near the beach and cast a floating bobber with flies or jigs beneath it. Read more

KingCo to have dickens of a time beating Eagles’ great expectations

September 1, 2009

 Riley Sorenson sets the ball for a teammate during volleyball team practice Aug. 27 at Pacific Cascade Freshman Campus.

Riley Sorenson sets the ball for a teammate during volleyball team practice Aug. 27 at Pacific Cascade Freshman Campus.

If Charles Dickens wrote a preseason preview of the Issaquah High School girls volleyball team, he would probably title it something like “Great Expectations.”

Wait a minute! He used that title for another book.

Great literature aside, one thing is fairly certain: 3A KingCo Conference opponents will have a dickens of a time beating the Eagles.

Although six players graduated from last season’s team that compiled a 28-4 record, won KingCo and Sea-King District championships, and placed third in the 3A state tournament, the Eagles are loaded again.

Four standouts are back for Issaquah. Outside hitters Casi Schwisow and Jenna Suttmeier, both seniors, earned all-KingCo first team honors and honorable mention all-state honors last year. Kristy LeMond, an outside hitter and libero, and Aubrey Jensen, a setter, earned all-league honorable mention.

In addition, the Eagles have three other returning players to go with a group of promising newcomers.

“Based on last year’s success, this year’s team has real high expectations,” Issaquah coach Todd Parsons said. “As good as last year’s team was, this year’s actually has more fire power.”

Schwisow and Suttmeier provide Issaquah with powerful and experienced hitters. Read more

Press Editorial

September 1, 2009

Mothballing parks  is not the answer

Klahanie Park is one of the biggest parks on the county’s hit list for mothballing. We understand the need to slice the budget, but the way King County Executive Kurt Triplett decided on which parks to cut maintenance has us concerned. Read more

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