Retired Marine thanks military for his education

January 12, 2009

Bruce Meyers holds a shadow box displaying his medals from World War II, Korea and Vietnam. On Meyers’ wall are a framed book cover from ‘Fortune Favors the Brave’ and a painting titled ‘Up From The Sea In Subs,’ which became cover art for ‘Swift, Silent and Deadly,’ Meyers’ second book. By Greg FarrarBruce Meyers holds a shadow box displaying his medals from World War II, Korea and Vietnam. On Meyers’ wall are a framed book cover from ‘Fortune Favors the Brave’ and a painting titled ‘Up From The Sea In Subs,’ which became cover art for ‘Swift, Silent and Deadly,’ Meyers’ second book. By Greg Farrar

The U.S. military is most commonly associated with strict training and life-or-death combat. But for retired marine Col. Bruce F. Meyers, the hallmark of his long and distinguished military career was the extensive education he received, preparing him for life in and out of service.

After 28 years in the Marines, Meyers retired from the service with a bachelor’s degree and a law degree. He used his education to help innovate the Marines and work to, as he put it, “save lives.”

“The GI Bill is one of the best things that could have happened to give the opportunity of education to all these people who had busted their tails on behalf of the U.S.,” Meyers said. “We had people who would have never had the opportunity to go to college had they never had the GI Bill.”

He served briefly in the Pacific near the end of World War II and then in Korea as a leader for Korean line crossers and then as a rifle company commander. But it wasn’t until after the Korean War that he would leave his lasting mark on the Marines.

On June 18, 1957, Meyers took command of the Marines first force reconnaissance team, the 1st Amphibious Reconnaissance Co. His team was tasked with delving deep into enemy territory to gather intelligence and positioning on the enemy for America’s front-line troops. It was the first American military outfit of its kind. 

“We were young, educated. We were the cream of the crop,” Meyers said. “We wanted to be with an elite unit, and we were elite. The rest of the Marines got upset when we said we were the best of the best.”

The unit still exists, under the name Marines Special Operations Command. Read more

Father, son heading to historic Barack Obama inauguration

January 12, 2009

Rob Sargent, of Newcastle, with President-elect Barack Obama at a June 1, 2007, fundraising reception at the Seattle Westin Hotel. By Debora Spencer Photography

Rob Sargent, of Newcastle, with President-elect Barack Obama at a June 1, 2007, fundraising reception at the Seattle Westin Hotel. By Debora Spencer Photography

Making a campaign contribution to Obama’s campaign: $25. Attending a 2007 Seattle fundraising reception for Obama: $500. Spending father-son time at Obama’s inauguration: priceless.

Next week, a Maywood Middle School student and his father will make a pilgrimage to Washington, D.C., to capture a glimpse of history in the making. Read more

Community Calendar

January 12, 2009

Events

The East King County office of the state Department of Revenue hosts a free workshop for new and small business owners from 1-4 p.m. Jan. 15 at Bellevue City Hall, 450 110th Ave. N.E., Room No. 1E-113. Participants will learn about Washington excise taxes, reporting classifications, deductions, tax incentives, sales tax collection and record-keeping requirements. All receive a workbook and helpful reference guide to Department of Revenue rules and regulations. Register by going to www.dor.wa.gov or calling 489-1723.

Issaquah History Museums volunteer Stephen Grate will lead an interpretive hike of the Issaquah-Superior mine site Jan. 17. This two and a half hour walking tour focuses on the operations of the Issaquah and Superior Mining Co. from the 1860s until the 1920s and includes remains of mine entrances from this era. Meet at the Issaquah Depot at 10 a.m. for a brief presentation about the history of Issaquah’s mining operations. The hike, held rain or shine, covers easy to moderate terrain. Bring appropriate clothing, foot gear, water and a sack lunch, and leave animal companions at home. The cost is $6 per person or $3 for members of the Issaquah History Museums. The presentation at the depot is free to the public. Call 392-3500 or e-mail info@issaquahhistory.org to obtain a hike registration form, or download one at www.issaquahhistory.org. Read more

Monica Mary Casey-Scott

January 12, 2009

Monica Casey-Scott, a widely traveled local native, succumbed in the late afternoon of Dec. 18, 2008. Read more

Donald A. Jerick

January 12, 2009

Donald A. Jerick

Donald A. Jerick, of North Bend and formerly of Issaquah, died Dec. 20, 2008, in Bellevue. He was 52.

Read more

Edna Barger

January 12, 2009

Edna Barger

Edna Barger, of Issaquah, died in Kirkland on Saturday, Jan. 3, 2009. She was 76.

Read more

Sammamish Baha’i invites all faiths to share in World Religion Day event

January 12, 2009

Considering what’s happening in Gaza, the idea that different religions can exist in harmony might be a tough sell, but that’s one of the main reasons that the Baha’i are sponsoring World Religion Day.

Read more

Zero-energy home features a living wall of compost

January 12, 2009

The first row of the 18-inch compost-filled sock is installed. ContributedThe first row of the 18-inch compost-filled sock is installed. Contributed

Donna Shirey, like many people, often wondered what happened to all that stuff that gets recycled, particularly the garbage, lawn trimmings and other miscellaneous mulch.

“Well, you can sell some to the Shirey house and build a living wall with it,” she said.

As president and CEO of the Issaquah business Shirey Contracting, Donna and her husband Riley have long been advocates of “green” building. They discovered the services of Cedar Grove Composting fit nicely into their concept for a “zero energy” house. Read more

Arts calendar

January 12, 2009

January

14th

Village Theatre’s KIDSTAGE TeenSelect program presents “Into The Woods” at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday – Saturday and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, at First Stage Theatre, 120 Front St. N. Tickets are $14 for general admission and $12 for youth and seniors. Call 392-2202. Read more

Writer debuts original play in return to stage

January 12, 2009

Actors give a reading of ‘The Gypsy King’ at the Village Originals Annual Festival of New Musicals in August 2008. By Sam FreemanActors give a reading of ‘The Gypsy King’ at the Village Originals Annual Festival of New Musicals in August 2008. By Sam Freeman

In the 1980s, there seemingly wasn’t a regional theater Randy Rogel hadn’t worked at, including the Seattle Repertoire Theatre, The Empty Space, 5th Avenue and the Seattle Children’s Theatre.

But as the theater veteran currently pays the bills writing songs for the likes of Steven Spielberg-animated projects, he realized there was one theater he longed to be a part of — Issaquah’s Village Theatre. There are even old acquaintances he shared the stage with in the ’80s who now roam the halls of Village Theatre, including Executive Producer Rob Hunt and Artistic Director Steve Thomkins.

The Emmy and Peabody award-winning writer believes he’s got the perfect project — “The Gypsy King” — to bring to Village Theatre’s Originals program, where unfinished works are brought to further work out the kinks.

“‘Gypsy King’ is less like ‘Rent’ and ‘Miss Saigon’ than it’s more like the old school productions of ‘Guys and Dolls’ and ‘The Music Man,’” Rogel explained. Read more

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