Off The Press

June 16, 2009

Get to know neighbors, community on a walk

People just don’t connect anymore like they used to. Sure, they might be plugged into all kinds of things — Facebook, MySpace, etc. But in my opinion, they don’t meet face to face and talk or just hang out. That needs to change.
I walk to work whenever possible. It gives my car a break, my mind a chance to clear before and after the workday and me the chance to see and hear much more that I would miss otherwise.
Take the man I met recently who was walking an elderly German shepherd. (And those of you who know me know I’m partial to that breed of animal.) Because he had fallen on hard times, the dog had been living with his mother for a year and a half. He’s glad to have her back and she seems equally thrilled to be with him.
I stop and chat with him and pet her whenever I see them now. My blood pressure lowers every time.
Another neighbor walks to the senior center most days for various activities. One recent day when I had to have my car for the day, I offered him a ride. He turned me down, saying the walk was one of the best parts of his day. He turned 90 years old recently. Maybe walking makes you live longer.
Sometimes, I cut through the park behind City Hall. (The grass is nicer under feet than concrete, especially after a long day at the office.) Watching children play and squeal with laughter can sure lighten your load for a bit. So, too, can watching the teens playing baseball in the late afternoons/early evenings. Makes me remember when I was a teen playing ball. Ah, those carefree summer days.
Then, there was the elderly man I talked to about his dog who passed away last year. It was obvious he was lonely, so I took the time to try to make him less so. Sure, I was a bit late to work that morning, but I’d like to think my boss would be understanding if she knew the “community service” I performed that morning in easing some of his sadness and sharing some of his fond memories with him.
I’ve also spent time looking at the buildings of downtown and reading the historical markers I pass, which have taught me some things about this community that I didn’t know.
I really enjoy music, and these walks are also giving me time to listen closely when I’m not chatting with passersby. I recently got the coolest pair of headphones you have ever seen or heard. The best thing about them, aside from the amazingly clear sound, even when turned up really loud, is that you design them yourself.
Go to http://ifrogz.com/earpollution/ and pick from various styles and dozens of colors and prints. Not only are mine as flashy as can be, but they have leopard-printed fur lining. Talk about comfort. I may never drive to work again!
Reach Editor Kathleen R. Merrill at 392-6434, ext. 227, or editor@isspress.com. Comment on this story at www.issaquahpress.com.
Kathleen R. Merrill Press Editor

Kathleen R. Merrill Press Editor

People just don’t connect anymore like they used to. Sure, they might be plugged into all kinds of things — Facebook, MySpace, etc. But in my opinion, they don’t meet face to face and talk or just hang out. That needs to change.

I walk to work whenever possible. It gives my car a break, my mind a chance to clear before and after the workday and me the chance to see and hear much more that I would miss otherwise.

Take the man I met recently who was walking an elderly German shepherd. (And those of you who know me know I’m partial to that breed of animal.) Because he had fallen on hard times, the dog had been living with his mother for a year and a half. He’s glad to have her back and she seems equally thrilled to be with him.

I stop and chat with him and pet her whenever I see them now. My blood pressure lowers every time. Read more

Press editorial

June 16, 2009

Parents can do duty  of Party Patrol

There are numerous government agency programs the public has come to depend on, but budget cuts have put them on hold or dropped them altogether. The King County Sheriff’s Party Patrol Task Force is one of them. The program aimed at preventing underage drinking and driving is the latest to fall victim to the budget ax.
Local police officers have historically been part of that task force. Only a few weeks ago, Issaquah police broke up a party in a Squak Mountain neighborhood that resulted in citations for 34 teens and adults under age 21.
According to a spokesman for the sheriff’s department, underage drinking citations generally go to high school students. The real concern, of course, is that drinking and driving will lead to someone’s death. It happens annually this time of year as the weather warms up — teens have more free time to enjoy themselves, and graduation parties abound.
Will Issaquah youth spend the summer mourning the death of one of their own? We pray not.
The fact is that we shouldn’t need the Party Patrol to prevent underage drinking and driving. That’s what parents are for. A parent patrol of adults watching out for their own teens, their teen’s friends, their neighboring teens or any other teens could effectively limit minors from alcohol consumption in the first place.
Unfortunately, some parents think a good approach is to let teens use their home to enjoy a beer or two with their friends. “Better than having them drink and drive” is how they justify it. But teaching kids that breaking the law as long as they don’t hurt anyone is not acceptable. Let’s not forget that parents who allow the drinking are also breaking the law and open themselves up to all kinds of liability issues.
With the Party Patrol gone, we hope parents will step up, partner with other parents and keep their youths safe — while teaching them to respect the law. There are plenty of special summer activities to keep them busy without a beer buzz.

There are numerous government agency programs the public has come to depend on, but budget cuts have put them on hold or dropped them altogether. The King County Sheriff’s Party Patrol Task Force is one of them. The program aimed at preventing underage drinking and driving is the latest to fall victim to the budget ax. Read more

Public Meetings

June 16, 2009

June 17

Development Commission Read more

New hatchery dam hinges on federal grant

June 16, 2009

By Warren Kagarise
City officials and environmentalists are waiting to hear whether the city will receive federal stimulus dollars to improve salmon habitat and the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery. Officials said the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration was set to announce grant recipients by mid-June.
The proposal aims to replace a dam that serves the hatchery with a structure friendlier to migrating salmon. The option to remove the dam, construct a series of boulder weirs and replace the intake hinges on more than $4 million in state and federal dollars.
The dam is located on Issaquah Creek about a half-mile upstream from the hatchery. A fish ladder blocks salmon and other fish migrating upstream.
“The existing fish ladder is very substandard,” city Surface Water Manager Kerry Ritland said.
Friends of the Issaquah Hatchery Executive Director Gestin Suttle said the project would improve the creek and make it easier for migrating salmon to pass. FISH is the volunteer group that runs educational programs at the hatchery and assists hatchery workers.
Suttle said many adult salmon become marooned and die each year when they jump onto the concrete apron at the base of the dam. She said the apron resembles a shelf.
Upstream, past the dam, “there’s a lot of great habitat beyond that,” she said.
More than 10 miles of salmon habitat exists upstream. Suttle said some fish make their way upstream to spawn despite the obstacle.
Ritland also noted the quality of salmon habitat above the dam.
“The system can take a lot more, but the dam up there is limiting that,” he said.
The hatchery was built as a federal Works Progress Administration project in 1936. Ritland said the original dam was overhauled in the 1960s. Suttle noted advances in the study of fish behavior and improved fish ladder designs since the last update.
“They didn’t know as much as they know now about fish behavior,” she said.
The dam and intake structure face other problems, too. When Issaquah Creek flooded in January, trees toppled near the intake and damaged a fence.
The $4 million would cover costs to design, permit and build the project. About $800,000 in state dollars has been earmarked for the project.
In April, city officials applied for a NOAA grant to cover the rest. If the city receives the grant, the project would take about two years to complete. Ritland said construction would have to be spread out in order to take advantage of the “fish window” — weeks when the work would be less likely to interfere with salmon activity.
If NOAA officials pass over the hatchery for a grant, Ritland said officials would seek other sources of funding. Because of the project’s cost, he said officials would likely try to net federal money.
On June 1, City Council members adopted goals for 2010 that include completion of the dam and intake project. Ritland said the proposal, like many long-term city projects, might not materialize next year because it depends on outside funding.
In March 2008, the city received a $400,000 Salmon Recovery Funding Board grant from the state Recreation and Conservation Office. The city, state Department of Fish and Wildlife, local agencies and FISH provided the required 15 percent local match for the grant, bringing the total to $470,000.
Planners conducted a study last year and evaluated several options for improving fish passage at the dam. The options ranged from adding a new fish ladder to demolishing the dam.
Planners selected an option that would remove the dam and replace it with a series of weirs that allow fish to pass through. The weirs would be fashioned from boulders. A new water supply intake structure would be built as well. The intake would supply water to the hatchery.
Nearly 200,000 year-old coho salmon died at the hatchery in November 2006 after leaves blocked the intake, cutting water flow to the hatchery and causing the water’s dissolved-oxygen content to fall too low for the number of fish in the pond.
Ritland said the proposed intake structure would limit the amount of sediment flowing to the hatchery. He said an airburst system would automatically remove debris from the intake screens. With the existing intake, workers have to trek to the intake to brush leaves from the screens each fall.
Engineers prepared a 1/16-scale model of the fish passage and a section of Issaquah Creek; Suttle watched a demonstration of the model last month at a SeaTac lab. She described the proposal as an advance over the existing structure.
Northwest Hydraulic Consultants, a Seattle firm, built the model to show how the weirs and intake structure would work with the creek. The model was used to help engineers determine how the structures would hold up in conditions ranging from summer base flow up to conditions similar to a 100-year flood.
Doug Hatfield, the state hatcheries operations manager for the region that includes Issaquah, said the Issaquah hatchery plays an important role in protecting salmon stocks in the middle of urbanized King County.
“We want to recover fish populations to the extent that they’re healthy,” he said.
Engineers inspect a 1/16-scale model of a proposed weir structure that would replace an aging dam upstream from the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery. By Gestin Suttle

Engineers inspect a 1/16-scale model of a proposed weir structure that would replace an aging dam upstream from the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery. By Gestin Suttle

City officials and environmentalists are waiting to hear whether the city will receive federal stimulus dollars to improve salmon habitat and the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery. Officials said the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration was set to announce grant recipients by mid-June.

The proposal aims to replace a dam that serves the hatchery with a structure friendlier to migrating salmon. The option to remove the dam, construct a series of boulder weirs and replace the intake hinges on more than $4 million in state and federal dollars.

The dam is located on Issaquah Creek about a half-mile upstream from the hatchery. A fish ladder blocks salmon and other fish migrating upstream.

“The existing fish ladder is very substandard,” city Surface Water Manager Kerry Ritland said.

Friends of the Issaquah Hatchery Executive Director Gestin Suttle said the project would improve the creek and make it easier for migrating salmon to pass. FISH is the volunteer group that runs educational programs at the hatchery and assists hatchery workers.

Suttle said many adult salmon become marooned and die each year when they jump onto the concrete apron at the base of the dam. She said the apron resembles a shelf.

Upstream, past the dam, “there’s a lot of great habitat beyond that,” she said.

More than 10 miles of salmon habitat exists upstream. Suttle said some fish make their way upstream to spawn despite the obstacle.

Ritland also noted the quality of salmon habitat above the dam.

“The system can take a lot more, but the dam up there is limiting that,” he said.

The hatchery was built as a federal Works Progress Administration project in 1936. Ritland said the original dam was overhauled in the 1960s. Suttle noted advances in the study of fish behavior and improved fish ladder designs since the last update.

“They didn’t know as much as they know now about fish behavior,” she said.

The dam and intake structure face other problems, too. When Issaquah Creek flooded in January, trees toppled near the intake and damaged a fence.

The $4 million would cover costs to design, permit and build the project. About $800,000 in state dollars has been earmarked for the project.

In April, city officials applied for a NOAA grant to cover the rest. If the city receives the grant, the project would take about two years to complete. Ritland said construction would have to be spread out in order to take advantage of the “fish window” — weeks when the work would be less likely to interfere with salmon activity.

If NOAA officials pass over the hatchery for a grant, Ritland said officials would seek other sources of funding. Because of the project’s cost, he said officials would likely try to net federal money.

On June 1, City Council members adopted goals for 2010 that include completion of the dam and intake project. Ritland said the proposal, like many long-term city projects, might not materialize next year because it depends on outside funding.

In March 2008, the city received a $400,000 Salmon Recovery Funding Board grant from the state Recreation and Conservation Office. The city, state Department of Fish and Wildlife, local agencies and FISH provided the required 15 percent local match for the grant, bringing the total to $470,000.

Planners conducted a study last year and evaluated several options for improving fish passage at the dam. The options ranged from adding a new fish ladder to demolishing the dam.

Planners selected an option that would remove the dam and replace it with a series of weirs that allow fish to pass through. The weirs would be fashioned from boulders. A new water supply intake structure would be built as well. The intake would supply water to the hatchery.

Nearly 200,000 year-old coho salmon died at the hatchery in November 2006 after leaves blocked the intake, cutting water flow to the hatchery and causing the water’s dissolved-oxygen content to fall too low for the number of fish in the pond.

Ritland said the proposed intake structure would limit the amount of sediment flowing to the hatchery. He said an airburst system would automatically remove debris from the intake screens. With the existing intake, workers have to trek to the intake to brush leaves from the screens each fall.

Engineers prepared a 1/16-scale model of the fish passage and a section of Issaquah Creek; Suttle watched a demonstration of the model last month at a SeaTac lab. She described the proposal as an advance over the existing structure.

Northwest Hydraulic Consultants, a Seattle firm, built the model to show how the weirs and intake structure would work with the creek. The model was used to help engineers determine how the structures would hold up in conditions ranging from summer base flow up to conditions similar to a 100-year flood.

Doug Hatfield, the state hatcheries operations manager for the region that includes Issaquah, said the Issaquah hatchery plays an important role in protecting salmon stocks in the middle of urbanized King County.

“We want to recover fish populations to the extent that they’re healthy,” he said.

Reach Reporter Warren Kagarise at 392-6434, ext. 234, or wkagarise@isspress.com. Comment on this story at www.issaquahpress.com.

Congrats, Tiger Mountain class of 2009

June 16, 2009

Tiger Mountain Community High School celebrated 23 students successfully earning their diplomas June 11 on the school grounds.
Tiger Mountain is for students seeking alternatives to traditional high schools. The school maintains a strong education focused on rigor and content; its staff teaches basic-skills programs, and educational plans are personalized for each student.
Senior class speakers were Christina Reddy and Eliana Pearl.
January graduates:
Alec DuBois
Joseph Herrera
Martin Kandler
Thomas Timmons
June graduates:
Derick Anderson
Cody Bancroft
Aaron Blumenzweig
Alex DeMarco
Ashley Gundersen
Emil Gundersen IV
Sumeet Harnal
Anthony Hembree
Patrick Lewis
Christine Malnerich
Vladislav Mnatsakanov
Bryce Nielsen
Eliana Pearl
Christina Reddy
Kyle Ryerson
Brittany Smith
Kelsey Tanay
Chase Tasca
Joshua Wood
 The graduation ceremony was a small, personalized event where each graduPhoto By Adam Eschbachate received praise from staff members.

The graduation ceremony was a small, personalized event where each graduPhoto By Adam Eschbachate received praise from staff members.

Tiger Mountain Community High School celebrated 23 students successfully earning their diplomas June 11 on the school grounds. Read more

Dare to go bare in skinny-dip record attempt

June 16, 2009

A nudist park south of Issaquah is participating in a national skinny-dip record attempt next month and you can join in.
Fraternity Snoqualmie Family Nudist Park is one site hosting the American Association for Nude Recreation event, The AANR Largest Skinny-dip Across North America.
The event will take place at noon July 11 at the park’s swimming and wading pools. Guinness World Records has agreed to create a new category for the largest number of people simultaneously skinny-dipping.
“This is a perfect excuse for anyone wanting to be nude in public for the first time,” said Dawnzella Gearhart, spokeswoman at Fraternity Snoqualmie. “People can say they’re participating in a world-record attempt.”
Fraternity Snoqualmie is a 40-acre park on the side of Tiger Mountain. Photo identification is required for admittance to the park. Children are welcome if accompanied by their parents. First-time visitors receive a complimentary one-day membership, Gearhart said.
Organizers expect between 500 and 600 people during the record-setting attempt that occurs the same weekend as Fraternity Snoqualmie’s Bare Buns Fun Run.
According to Guinness guidelines, participants must be completely nude during the skinny-dip in order to be counted. Swimmers may wear their suits when entering the water, but they must remove them and hold their suits overhead at the signal from the official that the event has begun. After the event, they can put their suits back on before leaving the water.
As with all Guinness World Records events, all record attempts must be witnessed by a designated member in standing of the local community.
The witness does not have to be nude to authenticate the event, she said.
A photographer will record the event and participants will need to sign a form indicating their likeness will be published.
“If someone doesn’t want to be photographed, they could turn around,” Gearhart said.
Some people have misgivings about swimming in the nude.
“Some people are afraid to be nude and they want to cover up their naughty parts, but we’re not afraid to be nude,” Gearhart said. “We’re happy to be in our own skin.”
Reach Reporter Jim Feehan at 392-6434, ext. 239, or jfeehan@isspress.com. Comment on this story at www.issaquahpress.com.

A nudist park south of Issaquah is participating in a national skinny-dip record attempt next month and you can join in. Read more

Emmick, Combs

June 16, 2009

Rebecca Emmick and Dustin Combs

Rebecca Emmick and Dustin Combs

Rebecca Emmick and Dustin Combs, both of Portland, Ore., were married June 6, 2009, at Immaculate Heart Catholic Church in Portland.

The Rev. John Amsberry presided.

A reception followed at the Secret Society Ballroom in Portland.

The bride’s parents are Mary and David Emmick, of Issaquah.

The bridal attendants were her sister Rachel Emmick, a 2001 graduate of Skyline High School, Katie Fletcher, Alex Crandall, Emily Klee and Brittany Arnold. Read more

Community calendar

June 16, 2009

Events
Mountains to Sound Greenway hosts the following trail maintenance and environmental restoration events. Trail events are from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Invasive removal events are from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. or 9 a.m. – noon. Register at www.mtsgreenway.org/volunteer/ events.
4June 27: Invasive removal at Issaquah Creek near the animal hospital in Issaquah
4June 27: Trail work on Squak Mountain
Neon Nights Dance Under the Summer Sun, for 10th- through 12th-graders, is from 6-11 p.m. June 18 at the Pickering Barn, 1730 10th Ave. N.W. Entry is $5 with a nonperishable food item donation or $7 without. All proceeds benefit the Issaquah Food and Clothing Bank. Space is limited to 300 people. Learn more by e-mailing bospartyplanners@hotmail.com.
Windermere’s Community Service Day is June 19 at the Issaquah Depot Museum. Volunteers will wash and treat the exterior and rolling stock; paint railings, doors and stairways; and weed and pick up trash. To participate, call 941-9096.
The 24th annual Block Party Quilters quilt show is from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. June 19-20 and from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. June 21 at the community center. Go to www.bpquilters.org.
The Issaquah Farmers Market is from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. June 20 at Pickering Barn, 1730 10th Ave. N.W. A creekside fly-fishing demonstration is at 11 a.m. at the hay barn. Get a picture with Dad with profits benefiting the Leukemia & Lymphonma Society. Go to www.issaquahfarmersmarket.org.
The Vasa Park Resort presents Family Fun Day at 12:30 p.m. June 21, at 3560 W. Lake Sammamish Parkway S.E. There will be Swedish pancakes, a Swedish coffee garden, beer garden, free pony rides, children’s games, cotton candy and face painting. Call 746-3260.
Eastside Catholic School hosts an information session from 7-8 p.m. June 23 at its Sammamish campus, 232 228th Avenue S.E. Sessions include an in-depth look at its 6-12 curriculum, programs and student life, and will conclude with an optional tour of the campus. Learn more by going to www.eastsidecatholic.org or calling 295-3001.
An Eastside King County Executive Community Forum, to allow the public to meet candidates for King County executive, hosted by The Snoqualmie Valley Chamber of Commerce and Gary and Jennifer Fancher, is at 7 p.m. June 25 at Twin Falls Middle School, 46910 S.E. Middle Fork Road, North Bend. Submit questions for the forum to eastkcforum@gmail.com. The event is open to all King County residents.
The Issaquah Amateur Radio Club participates in the American Radio Relay League’s annual Field Day June 26-27 at the Sunny Hills Elementary School playground. The club will set up field radio communication stations, get on the air and contact hundreds of other operators in the U.S. and Canada. Set up begins at 9 a.m. June 27 with the goal of getting on the air at 11 a.m. Operations will continue until 11 a.m. Sunday. The public is invited. Call John MacDuff at 392-7623.
Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust and REI have teamed up to do a trail maintenance project at Squak Mountain from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. June 27. The work will primarily involve trail tread improvements and construction of a new turnpike to help elevate the trail through a wet area. Call 206-812-0122 or go to www.mtsgreenway.org/volunteer/events/vol-trails-form.
The city Parks and Recreation Department’s All-American Independence Celebration, featuring songs, readings, singalongs and stories that commemorate the Fourth of July, is at 3 p.m. June 28 at Pickering Barn. Admission is $9 per person or $25 per family. Call 837-3300.
Resident Events is celebrating the Fourth of July, 25th birthday of Providence Point from noon – 5 p.m. July 4 in the clubhouse and on the lawn. There will be music by Jim McKay and Friends, games, food and fun. Tickets are $5, or $7 after July 1. Call 392-8596 or 391-7669.
Fundraisers
The 25th Annual Eagles Aerie No. 3054 Golf Classic is Aug. 8 at Lake Wilderness Golf Course, 25400 Witte Road S.E., Maple Valley. Registration deadline for an individual golfer of $79 is July 25. Late registration after July 26 is $90. Twosomes are $158 and $178. Foursomes are $316 and $350. Sign-in starts at 7 a.m. with a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. A banquet follows at the Issaquah Eagles, 175 Front St. N. Funds go to support the Issaquah Eagles and its charities. Go to www.golfdigestplanner.com/12015-25thAnnualEagles3054GolfClassic.
Religious/spiritual
“Life Quest – A Middle Schooler’s Journey to Happiness,” for students entering sixth through eighth grades in the fall, is June 22. Think of it as a book club in action. Part One is to the Woodland Park Zoo. The class is hosted by “The Edge” youth ministry at Mary, Queen of Peace Catholic Church, 1121 228th Ave. S.E., Sammamish. Go to www.mqp.org for more information and registration, or call Anne Ginther at 391-1178, ext. 129.
Classes
ArtEAST offers the following workshops at its gallery, Up Front [art], 48 Front St. N. Go to www.arteast.org/workshops to sign up.
4“Gauguin and Tahiti” — 7-9 p.m. June 22 — $15
4“Paint Your Cake and Eat it Too: Plein-air Pastries” — 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. June 27 — $55
4“The Art of Collage and Assemblage” — 7-9 p.m. June 29 — $15
“Parenting with love and logic,” offered by the city of Issaquah Parks and Recreation Department, is from 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays June 24-July 22 at the Community Center. Fee is $75 per person or $100 per couple. Call 890-2081.
The city of Issaquah Parks and Recreation Department offers the following one-day workshops at the community center:
4“Outdoor Watercolor Landscapes” — noon-2 p.m. June 27 —ages 5-18 — $16
4“Watercolor Postcards” — noon – 2 p.m. July 11 — ages 6-11 — $16
4“Nature Sketchbook Drawing” — July 18 — ages 7-14 — $16
Issaquah Library
The library is at 10 W. Sunset Way. Call 392-5430.
Celebrate The Big Read and the featured book, “The Call of the Wild,” by taking a digital photo of you or family member reading to your dog(s). Submit photos to readtoyourdog@kcls.org as a .jpg photo before June 30. Check online after July 15 for a printable poster featuring our KCLS readers and their dogs.
The library offers the free program for adults “Basic Digital Photography” at 7-9 p.m. June 23.
Study Zone, an opportunity to get free homework help from volunteer tutors, is at 4 p.m. Mondays – Thursdays through June 18.
Spanish Early Literacy Parties are Mondays at 7 p.m. through June.
Manga Group Art Walk is at 5 p.m. June 24, featuring artwork by the Manga Group, henna tattoos and manga-inspired treats.
Meet Christopher R. Mattix, the author of “Nobody,” as he discusses his story of poverty, desperation and ultimate redemption, at 7 p.m. June 30.
Read three books, write three short, thoughtful reviews, and get a new paperback book — free. Pick up an entry form at the library or at www.kcls.org/read3.
FreePlay — Stop by the library any day to borrow a Nintendo DS and games to play for up to two hours. Those 14 and older need an ID; those under 14 need an adult with an ID.
Be Creative @ Your Library — the 2009 Summer Reading Program, is June 15 – Aug. 31. Read 500 minutes and receive a halfway prize; read 1,000 minutes to receive the finisher prize and be eligible for the grand-prize drawing of a laptop computer! Prizes will be distributed beginning July 15. Grand-prize winner will be announced in September.
Senior Center
Center hours are from 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Activities are open to people 55 and older. The center is at 75 N.E. Creek Way. Call 392-2381.
“English as a Second Language: Intermediate Level” is from 10:15 a.m. – noon, every other Monday.
The following day trips are offered in June:
4Redwind Casino — 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. June 22 — free
4Fort Nisqually and Rose Garden of Point Defiance Park — 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. June 24 — $12
4Let’s go sailing in the Puget Sound from Pier 54 on the sloop Obsession — 9:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. June 29 — $25
4Line dancing classes are from 10-11 a.m. Thursdays — $5.
Computer Lab Tutor teaches free basic skills from 1-2 p.m. Tuesdays.
Keyboard Music For Adults is from 11 a.m. – noon Tuesdays for beginners and 1-2 p.m. Thursdays for continuing classes. Fee is $90. Keyboards are provided.
Activity night is from 6-9 p.m. Wednesdays.
Appointments can be made for foot care clinics every Thursday — $25.
Ping Pong is from 1-4 p.m. Fridays and 6-9 p.m. Wednesdays.
Tai Chi is from 9-10 a.m. Mondays.
Cards are played at 9:30 a.m. Thursdays.
Pinochle is at 1 p.m. Tuesdays.
Bridge is from 10:55 a.m. – 3 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays.
Happy Hookers needlework group meets from 11 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Thursdays.
Mahjong is from 9 a.m. – noon Tuesdays.
Tai Chi classes are from 9-10 a.m. Mondays.

Events

 File Check out Librarypolooza  Teen Music Show: Librarypolooza, is at 7 p.m. June 19, with local bands Something About Envy, Jeff Stillwell (above), Save Kate, Seahouse, Masters and Johnson, and others. High school ID cards will be checked at the door.File Check out Librarypolooza  Teen Music Show: Librarypolooza, is at 7 p.m. June 19, with local bands Something About Envy, Jeff Stillwell (above), Save Kate, Seahouse, Masters and Johnson, and others. High school ID cards will be checked at the door.Check out Librarypolooza Teen Music Show: Librarypolooza, is at 7 p.m. June 19, with local bands Something About Envy, Jeff Stillwell (above), Save Kate, Seahouse, Masters and Johnson, and others. High school ID cards will be checked at the door.File Check out at the door. File

Mountains to Sound Greenway hosts the following trail maintenance and environmental restoration events. Trail events are from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Invasive removal events are from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. or 9 a.m. – noon. Register at www.mtsgreenway.org/volunteer/ events. Read more

Kathleen Theresa Goodman

June 16, 2009

Kathleen Theresa Goodman
Kathleen Theresa Goodman, of Issaquah, died June 7, 2009, at home. She was 83.
There will be a rosary, time to be announced, Thursday evening, June 18, at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Issaquah. A funeral Mass will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, June 19, also at St. Joseph’s, followed by a reception at the church.
She was born Aug. 14, 1925, in Miller, S.D., one of 12 children to William and Anna Parker. In 1943, she married John Goodman in Shelby, Mont. After the armed services, they settled in Great Falls, Mont. In 1956, they moved their family to Seattle and in 1966, to Issaquah.
Survived by her husband of 66 years, John, she was the mother of 14 children, seven of which survive today: Paulette Myers, of La Quinta, Calif.; Anne Blake, of Marina, Calif.; Barbe Goodman, of Issaquah; Rosemary Perez, of Redmond; Roger Goodman, of Boise, Idaho; Georgia Hanna, of Spanaway; and Joyce Lamb, of Squamish, British Columbia. She is also survived by 21 grandchildren (three deceased) and 29 great-grandchildren. She also leaves behind her sister Helen Garbolski, of Windsor Locks, Conn.; brothers-in-law Bill Goodman, of Seattle, and Bill Finch, of Kent; sister-in-law Betty Manix, of Hayward, Calif.; and numerous nieces and nephews.
A caring and loving person, her single purpose in life was her faith in God and her family. Her most endearing quality was her laughter.
Arrangements are entrusted to Flintoft’s Issaquah Funeral Home and Crematory.
Friends and relatives are invited to view photos, get directions to the service, check time for the rosary and share memories in the family’s online guest book
Kathleen Goodman

Kathleen Goodman

Kathleen Theresa Goodman, of Issaquah, died June 7, 2009, at home. She was 83. Read more

Olga A. Seil

June 16, 2009

Olga A. Seil
Olga A. Seil, a longtime    Issaquah resident, died June 1, 2009, in Spokane. She was 90.
At her request, a private family gathering will be held in the future.
Olga was born Jan. 8, 1919, in Galesburg, N.D., the daughter of Adolph and Gena Kjelmyhr. She was raised and attended school in Galesburg.
In 1943, she moved to Renton, where she worked for The Boeing Co. during World War II. Olga married Walter Seil at the Issaquah Community Church on June 23, 1945. She was a member of the Issaquah Historical Society, Issaquah Orthopedics, Issaquah Senior Center and the Emblem Club of the Issaquah Elks.
In her leisure time, she enjoyed knitting, crocheting, quilting, gardening, baking, camping and spending time with her family.
Olga is survived by two daughters, Sandra (Larry) Barnes, of Spokane, Mary (Leonard) McClary, of Burlington, Ky.; two grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.
The family suggests remembrances to the Issaquah History Museums or Children’s Hospital Foundation.
Arrangements are entrusted to Flintoft’s Funeral Home and Crematory.
Friends are invited to share memories and sign the family’s online guest book at www.flintofts.com.
Olga Seil

Olga Seil

Olga A. Seil, a longtime    Issaquah resident, died June 1, 2009, in Spokane. She was 90. Read more

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