Timberlake Park dog ban proponents, opponents dig in ahead of city meeting

August 25, 2009

At left, Chuck Klein, a neighbor near Timberlake Park for 23 years, cleans an eye on Coby, his golden Labrador, after a walk. Above, a new local resident, who didn’t want her named published, walks her dog to the Lake Sammamish shoreline at Timberlake Park. By Greg Farrar

At left, Chuck Klein, a neighbor near Timberlake Park for 23 years, cleans an eye on Coby, his golden Labrador, after a walk. Above, a new local resident, who didn’t want her named published, walks her dog to the Lake Sammamish shoreline at Timberlake Park. By Greg Farrar

A sign at the entrance to Timberlake Park carries a stern warning to pet owners leading dogs down the leafy trail: “No Dogs Allowed.” Since the sign went up last month, however, pet owners have flaunted the dog ban.

City officials, eager to prevent safety mishaps at the park, responded in kind. Pet owners are now likely to encounter parks staffers or Issaquah Police officers, who tell them about the municipal ordinance that prohibits dogs in most city parks.

Timberlake Park, 24 acres nestled against the southern shore of Lake Sammamish, was open to dogs until earlier this summer.

City officials banned dogs after they received reports from people about dog waste littering the grounds, park goers getting knocked down by dogs and dogs fighting with each other.

“Our position at the city, of course, is safety,” Parks & Recreation Director Anne McGill said.

A series of incidents at the park were recounted in calls and e-mails to city parks staffers. McGill recounted a call from a mother at the park whose children could be heard crying in the background after a dog had knocked them down.

Officials described incidents in which wayward dogs snatched food from picnic tables and darted off park property into nearby backyards.

City officials will host a Sept. 9 open house to review pet rules and concerns about Timberlake Park. Read more

Learn about FEMA flood grants at meetings

August 25, 2009

City officials will apply for cash through the federal Hazard Mitigation Grant Program. Read more

Youths trek like pioneers

August 25, 2009

From left to right, Eli Manning (of Newport High School), Rebecca Carter (of Mount Si High School), Jordan Chin (of Newport High), Jason Barrus (of Mount Si High) and Conner Green (of Issaquah High School) pull a handcart up a steep hill, part of a seven-mile trip. They were in the Scott Gordon family. By Mark Griffith

From left to right, Eli Manning (of Newport High School), Rebecca Carter (of Mount Si High School), Jordan Chin (of Newport High), Jason Barrus (of Mount Si High) and Conner Green (of Issaquah High School) pull a handcart up a steep hill, part of a seven-mile trip. They were in the Scott Gordon family. By Mark Griffith

What was it like to be an early American pioneer, crossing the Great Plains? More than 200 youths ages 12-18 and 100 adults recently set out to gain that experience, wearing pioneer clothing and pulling handcarts for four days through the hills of Eastern Washington, in an event labeled Trek Northwest ’09.

“Trek was developed more than 20 years ago at Brigham Young University as a way for youth to do more than just learn about pioneers,” said Wright Noel, the event coordinator. “In four days, they get to experience what it was like to be a pioneer.”

Trek ’09 is sponsored by the Bellevue, Wash., South Stake of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and is held once every four years.

“It’s open to the community,” explained Noel, “and this year, included participants from Issaquah, and six surrounding cities.”

The teens were assigned to a family consisting of a “Ma” and “Pa” who had been pre-screened, and then grouped with other ”siblings,” usually eight to nine per family. An additional 100 adult volunteers assisted throughout the journey, including medical personnel to ensure safety throughout the four-day event. Read more

New loaned art pieces unveiled

August 25, 2009

Three carved cedar poles by Steve Jensen stand at the intersection of Rainier Avenue and East Sunset Way for public viewing. The poles will stand for one year as part of a loaned public art program. By Chantelle Lusebrink

Three carved cedar poles by Steve Jensen stand at the intersection of Rainier Avenue and East Sunset Way for public viewing. The poles will stand for one year as part of a loaned public art program. By Chantelle Lusebrink

The first of two loaned public art pieces made its debut in Issaquah Aug. 17.

The piece is a sculpture called “Forest Carvings,” by Seattle artist Steve Jensen. He installed the pieces in the grassy area at the intersection of East Sunset Way and Rainier Avenue South.

“When we look at public art that is going to be in the community, we want to make sure it is accessible,” Amy Dukes, city art coordinator, said of the site. “Public art enhances public spaces and creates a sense of place in spaces that would be unusable otherwise.”

The work is set in a grove of trees near the intersection, a perfect location, Jensen said.

“I love the idea of carved trees in a grove of trees,” he said.

The sculpture is three 8-foot, carved cedar poles and demonstrates the city and its residents’ value of the environment and the land.

The cedar tree Jensen used to create the piece was a naturally felled tree, which he said he believed he obtained in Southworth, Wash.

“I like to use as much natural materials as possible,” he said. “I don’t cut trees for the sake of my work. I use what is already there.” Read more

Where the rubber meets the road

August 25, 2009

Cycling club raises funds for domestic violence survivors

Sharon Anderson (left) and Deborah Taylor, co-captains of the Lakemont Ladies Cycling Club, relax recently after 15 members enjoyed a 23-mile round-trip ride from Eastgate to around Mercer Island. By Greg Farrar

Sharon Anderson (left) and Deborah Taylor, co-captains of the Lakemont Ladies Cycling Club, relax recently after 15 members enjoyed a 23-mile round-trip ride from Eastgate to around Mercer Island. By Greg Farrar

Dedicated to cycling, members of the Lakemont Ladies Cycling Club get up nearly every day and leave a little more rubber on local roads.

But it’s the impressions they’ve left in the lives of women recovering from domestic violence that have made the biggest difference.

“It is so refreshing and exciting that women have gotten together to help other women,” said Barbara Langdon, executive director of the Eastside Domestic Violence Program. “That’s such an amazing piece of this, they are helping their sisters in need who aren’t able to help themselves.”

Beginning in 2007, the club started as a place where women could come together and ride, said Sharon Anderson, a founder of the club and ride coordinator for Cycle the Wave.

“There just isn’t a lot of options available for women who want to ride with other women,” said Deborah Taylor, another founding member.

By 2008, the cycling group had added 60 members and though members had ridden thousands of miles, Anderson said she felt there was more they could do. Read more

Habitat for Humanity’s Build-A-Thon needs volunteers

August 25, 2009

Work for a great cause by volunteering for the Habitat for Humanity Build-A-Thon from Sept. 19 – Oct. 3. Read more

Who’s news

August 25, 2009

Connie Fletcher, Kiwanis Club President Judy Rogers and Joan Probala (from left), of the Kiwanis Community Services Committee, display the calculators collected so far. Contributed

Connie Fletcher, Kiwanis Club President Judy Rogers and Joan Probala (from left), of the Kiwanis Community Services Committee, display the calculators collected so far. Contributed

Kiwanis challenges Rotary, chamber to school supplies drive

The Kiwanis Club of Issaquah has challenged the Rotary Club and the Greater Issaquah Chamber of Commerce to see who can collect the most calculators for back-to-school backpacks, via the food bank. The goal is 100 per group by Aug. 31. Instead of collecting pencils and paper, the focus was on the TI-30x IIS calculator, which the math curriculum committee chose as the best for Issaquah School District students. Read more

Community calendar

August 25, 2009

Events

A decade as neighbor Sammamish Nights, celebrating the 10th anniversary  of the city of Sammamish, is from 6-10 p.m. Aug. 29 at      City Hall at Sammamish Commons, 801 228th Ave. S.E. There will be wine, food and entertainment by jazz  musician  Darren Motamedy. Tickets are $35.  Purchase tickets at www.sammamishchamber.org. File

A decade as neighbor Sammamish Nights, celebrating the 10th anniversary of the city of Sammamish, is from 6-10 p.m. Aug. 29 at City Hall at Sammamish Commons, 801 228th Ave. S.E. There will be wine, food and entertainment by jazz musician Darren Motamedy. Tickets are $35. Purchase tickets at www.sammamishchamber.org. File

Lakeside Center is holding an Autism Open House from 4-8 p.m. Aug. 27 at 1871 N.W. Gilman Blvd., across from the Hilton Garden Inn. All prospective parents, current parents, pediatricians and families are invited to attend. Learn about preschool classrooms, therapy programs and meet new members of the staff. Call 657-0620 for more information. R.S.V.P. by e-mailing Rebecca@lakesideautism.com.

Two recently born Bengal tiger cubs will be on display from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. through Aug. 31 at the Cougar Mountain Zoo, 19525 S.E. 54th St. Admission is $8 – $10.50. Call 391-5508.

It’s Kid’s Day at the Issaquah Farmers Market, from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Aug. 29 at Pickering Barn, 1730 10th Ave. N.W. Children 18 and under are invited to sell handmade items. Register by calling 837-3311. Kaze Daiko Taiko Drum Band performs at 11 a.m. Pony rides will be on the grass lawn. Issaquah Camera Club will display photos in the Hay Barn. Call 837-3300. Read more

Program connects families in need with cribs

August 25, 2009

Those wanting to help battle Sudden Infant Death Syndrome can make monetary donations to the Northwest Infant Survival Alliance. Contributed

Those wanting to help battle Sudden Infant Death Syndrome can make monetary donations to the Northwest Infant Survival Alliance. Contributed

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome can devastate a family, but those working in the King County Sheriff’s Office said they realize many SIDS crises can be averted with a few simple steps.

The office has partnered with the Northwest Infant Survival Alliance to provide cribs for families in need in areas around Issaquah that they patrol. Deputies patrol areas like Klahanie, the Renton Highlands, Southeast Issaquah-Hobart Road and west of the city limits along Newport Way.

If deputies notice an infant in a sleeping environment that could lead to a SIDS death or an accidental suffocation, they will connect that family with the alliance and a free crib.

“Normally, we go out on infant death,” said Scott Dungan, a community service officer in the Special Assault Unit. “We wanted to be able to catch it at the other end and help prevent infant death.”

Seven cribs have been donated since the partnership between the sheriff’s office and the alliance began in April. Read more

Willis ‘Marty’ Martinez

August 25, 2009

Willis Martinez

Willis Martinez

Marty Martinez, of Issaquah, died Saturday, Aug. 15, 2009. He was 81. Read more

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