Susan F. Stuart

June 16, 2009

Susan F. Stuart
Susan F. Stuart, of Issaquah, died Tuesday, June 9, 2009 at Providence Marianwood in Issaquah. She was 63.
A celebration of Susan’s life will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 20, at Flintoft’s Funeral Home and Crematory, 540 E. Sunset Way, Issaquah.
Susan was born April 15, 1946, in Sheridan, Wy., to George and Evelyn Stutsman. She was raised in Sheridan until 1957, when she and her family moved to Renton. Susan went on to graduate from Renton High School in 1964. Following high school, Susan furthered her education at the University of Washington, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in 1968.
In summer 1970 in Renton, Susan married James Stuart, of Seattle. They moved to Pasadena, Calif., in the early 1970s and she worked as a graphic artist. In early 1975, Susan moved to Bremerton, where she continued her work as a graphics designer in Seattle.
In the late 1990s, Susan moved to Fall City and started a new career as a massage therapist. As co-owner of Ancient Age in Issaquah, Susan was a respected massage therapist. She worked hard to hone her skills and give her clients a relaxing and wonderful experience.
In her leisure time, Susan enjoyed outdoor activities of all kinds, especially camping and socializing with friends. She is remembered by her family as an outstanding daughter, abiding friend and fantastic person. Susan possessed the special ability to make others laugh, a kind smile and a loving nature. She is deeply missed.
Survivors include her devoted father, George Stutsman, and step-mother, Betty Stutsman, of Issaquah; step-siblings Jim Fant, Barbara Ranta, Deborah Daniels and Laurie Sendustan; and numerous extended family members and friends.
The family suggests remembrances to Providence Marianwood or Providence Hospice.
Friends are invited to get directions, view photos and share memories in the family’s online guest book at www.flintofts.com.

Susan F. Stuart, of Issaquah, died Tuesday, June 9, 2009 at Providence Marianwood in Issaquah. She was 63. Read more

Kelly Ranch owner Violet Kelly, 86, dies

June 16, 2009

Violet Kelly, the heart and soul of the Kelly Ranch, died unexpectedly from a brainstem hemorrhage June 6, 2009, with her family by her side. She was 86.
A celebration of her life will be held at 1 p.m. Saturday, June 20, at the Kelly Ranch, 7212 Renton-Issaquah Road S.E., Issaquah.
She was born Feb. 20, 1923, in Culdesac, Idaho, to Christian and Helga Frederickson. She graduated as class valedictorian from Culdesac High School in 1941. She moved to Seattle to attend comptometer school and went to work for Langendorf Bread Co.
In January 1945, she met her husband, John, at work. They were married March 15, 1945. They lived in West Seattle, where they enjoyed ballroom dancing and playing cards with friends.
In 1957, they moved to Issaquah (next to Sunset Elementary School), where the saga of the Kelly Ranch began with their first horse, Dolly, and providing trail rides to the kids at Sambica Bible Camp.
Mrs. Kelly never knew a stranger. Always wanting to help those in need, she opened her home to everyone, including six foster children and two elderly patients while tending to the horses and her own expanding family. Her parents also lived with the family for many years until their deaths.
In the early 1970s, one of the foster children she took in was a teenage boy who was severely burned in a house fire, said David Kelly, Violet’s son.
“He had burns over 50 percent of his body and some people thought he looked like a monster, but not my mom,” he said. “He needed a home at the time and my mom was there for him.”
About five years ago, David Kelly flew his mother by helicopter so she could attend her 65th high school reunion in Idaho.
“She showed me where she grew up and she had the time of her life,” he said.
He said he still runs into people who rode horses at the Kelly Ranch decades ago.
“My mom used to say that the rich could afford to ride horses, but that wasn’t the case for those less fortunate,” he said.
Violet’s daughter, Teresa Bradley, said her mother was kind-hearted and giving, including taking in homeless individuals.
“She always saw the best in everybody and gave them the benefit of the doubt,” she said. “Mom was one of the most giving people you’d ever meet.”
With the expansion of Interstate 90 in 1969, they relocated to their present location on Renton-Issaquah Road. Over the next 40 years, their business expanded to more than 50 horses and included trail rides, lessons, boarding, horse shows and the annual Salmon Days parade.
Mrs. Kelly spent the last year of her life living with her daughter Nancy and Ernie, but still spending three afternoons a week at the ranch. Mrs. Kelly treasured her memories of riders and visitors from around the world. After retirement, she couldn’t go anywhere without someone coming up to her and saying, “I used to ride at the Kelly Ranch.”
Violet was preceded in death by her husband, John, in 2000. Survivors include three daughters, Nancy, Teresa Bradley and Colleen Kronk; sons Danny and David Kelly;  eight grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and three great-great-grandchildren.
Remembrances can be made to World Concern, Children’s Hospital or Evergreen Hospice.
Friends are invited to share memories and sign the family’s online guest book at www.flintofts.com.
death-kelly,violet-20090600

Violet Kelly

Violet Kelly, the heart and soul of the Kelly Ranch, died unexpectedly from a brainstem hemorrhage June 6, 2009, with her family by her side. She was 86. Read more

Franklyn Ora Ziegler

June 16, 2009

Franklyn Ora Ziegler
Franklyn Ora Ziegler, of Sammamish, died Thursday, June 4, 2009, surrounded by family, after a two-year battle with lung cancer. He was 73.
Per his wishes, a private family celebration was held to honor him.
Born in Pocatello, Idaho, in 1935, he was the oldest of Frank and Fern’s five children and grew up in the Pahsimeroi Valley. After graduating from Payette High School in 1953, he married his high school sweetheart, Joanne Gamble, in 1954.
He had worked 10 years for Idaho Power when, with great courage, he moved his family to Bellevue in 1969 and continued his career with Puget Power. After 25 years with Puget Power, he retired as a serviceman. In 1992, the family moved to the Beaver Lake area of Issaquah.
Throughout his working years, he built a seaside vacation home where his family would gather on the Long Beach Peninsula. Spending time at the beach, visiting Maui and living on the lake with Joanne was how he enjoyed his retirement.
He is survived by his wife Joanne; five children, Lynanne (Steve) Lewis, Valerie Ziegler, Lori (Rick) Wilson, Nick (Deanne) Ziegler and Traci (Ira) McDaniel; and eight grandchildren.
Arrangements are by Flintoft’s Issaquah Funeral Home.
Family and friends are invited to share memories and sign the family’s online guestbook at www.flintofts.com.
Franklyn Ziegler

Franklyn Ziegler

Franklyn Ora Ziegler, of Sammamish, died Thursday, June 4, 2009, surrounded by family, after a two-year battle with lung cancer. He was 73. Read more

Patricia E. (Morgan) Kubel

June 16, 2009

Patricia E. (Morgan) Kubel
Patricia E. (Morgan) Kubel completed her life’s journey on June 3, 2009, after a 10-month valiant battle with cancer.
She was born in Seattle, to George E. and Lillie B.(Hoye) Morgan on Dec. 20, 1940. She was raised in Issaquah, and graduated from Issaquah High School in 1958. Pat sang in the choir in high school and also at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church choir.
In the early 1960s, she was a member of a USO troop in Seattle, where she met her future husband, Samuel Robert Kubel. They were married in the Bahamas in 1964. She and Sam spent the next eight years traveling to different naval bases: Eleuthera, The Bahamas, Rota and Cadiz, Spain, and back to finish his naval career in New York and New Jersey.
In the early 1970s, they returned to Sacramento, Calif., where she was office manager and private secretary to the rabbi at Temple B’Nai Israel until 1986, when Pat decided to move back to Washington to be closer to her family. She made her home in Olympia for 23 years during which time she became a member of the Sweet Adelines. She worked several places during these years, but finished her career at the Thurston County Auditor’s Office in the Financial Services Division, where she gained a second family.
She was predeceased by her parents.
She is survived by her sister, Michele Ann (Mike) and Bob Drewett, of Olympia; nephew John and Valerie Drewett, of Tenino, and their four children, Megan and Jason Sanders, Tyler, Matthew and Kelsey Drewett; niece Erin and Dave Houseman, of Rainier, and their three children, Devon, Aaron and Michael; brother John and Gayle Morgan, of Issaquah; niece Tanya and her son Nathan; nephew Bob and Jodine Morgan and their children, Aaron, Brianne, Cierra and Daytona.
Pat also had four great-great-nieces and nephews, Kylea, Jayson, Lilyana and William. She is also survived by many other relatives and friends.
A celebration of Pat’s life was held at 1 p.m. June 13 at the Lacey Community Center, 6729 Pacific Ave. S.E., Lacey.
The family has requested that there be no flowers. Donations can be made to the American Cancer Society, Group Health Oncology Department of Olympia or the Little Red Schoolhouse Project c/o The Thurston County Auditor’s Office, Financial Services Division or the charity of your choice.
Arrangements are by Funeral Alternatives of Washington. Sign Pat’s online guest book at www.funeralalternatives.org.
Patricia Kubel

Patricia Kubel

Patricia E. (Morgan) Kubel completed her life’s journey on June 3, 2009, after a 10-month valiant battle with cancer. Read more

Skyline grad tips the scales in his favor

June 16, 2009

By Jim Feehan
Chris Darnell wanted to set a good example for children as a youth pastor. So, he shed 75 pounds this year and hasn’t put one pound on since.
“I figured I can’t teach kids to eat healthy if I looked the way I did,” said Darnell, 26, of North Bend.
Darnell underwent a rigorous, twice-daily workout, lifting weights and running on a treadmill as part of the Gold’s Gym Challenge. He and about 70 other individuals at the Issaquah, Redmond and Bothell Gold’s Gyms lost a combined 1,430 pounds during a 12-week span.
The weight loss is remarkable, given the number of Americans who are either overweight or obese.
After a quarter-century of increases, obesity prevalence has not measurably increased in the past few years, but levels are still high — 34 percent of U.S. adults age 20 and over are obese, according to a new study released last week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
The report, Obesity Among Adults in the United States — No Change Since 2003-2004, is the latest analysis based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, conducted by CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics.
A former lineman on the 2000 state championship Skyline High School football team, Darnell said he was always a big boy. During his gridiron days at Skyline, he tipped the scales at between 250 and 260 pounds. On New Year’s Day 2009, he weighed 367 pounds; today, he weighs about 290, he said.
“I take pride in the fact that I did this for me,” Darnell said.
The pounds came off and stayed off by him eating a high-protein diet with a lot of fruits and vegetables. He wants to drop 30 more pounds in the coming weeks.
“I want to be a sexy 260 pounds by my wedding in mid-July,” he said with a grin.
Helen Martin, 38, of Mercer Island, lost 18 pounds in 12 weeks and reduced her body fat to 11 percent. Thirteen years ago, a semi truck slammed into Martin’s Honda Accord on Interstate 5 in Seattle. The impact injured her shoulder and curtailed her weight-lifting regimen in the gym.
“Fortunately, my trainer at Gold’s also had a shoulder injury, so he tailored a training program that worked for me,” said Martin, a real estate agent based in Bellevue.
Martin recommends a good cardio workout, a diet devoid of cheese, butter, bread, pasta potatoes, candies, ice cream and cake. In addition, go easy on the alcohol.
“What made the difference for me was that I set a goal to lose weight, focused on that goal and achieved it,” Martin said.
Darnell said he eliminated dairy, whole wheat and processed sugar from his diet.
“Do it for yourself and not for someone else, eat smaller meals, and cut out the fast food and soft drinks,” he said. “We humans are grazers and we’re not built to eat three large meals a day.”
Darnell will eat six to eight small meals a day consisting of a slice of fruit, broccoli and perhaps a chicken breast.
Darnell operates a Kettle Corn stand outside the Issaquah Home Depot when he’s not working as an intern at Eastridge Christian Assembly church. His Kettle Corn stand affords a great view of Krispy Kreme, the donut emporium he worked at for 18 months.
“I really don’t crave it, but every once in a while I’ll have a Reese’s peanut butter cup,” he said.
Reach Reporter Jim Feehan at 392-6434, ext. 239, or jfeehan@isspress.com. Comment on this story at www.issaquahpress.com.
Skyline High School graduate Chris Darnell, 26, weighed 367 pounds before joining the Gold’s Gym Challenge. Today, he’s down to 290.

Skyline High School graduate Chris Darnell, 26, weighed 367 pounds before joining the Gold’s Gym Challenge. Today, he’s down to 290.

Chris Darnell wanted to set a good example for children as a youth pastor. So, he shed 75 pounds this year and hasn’t put one pound on since.

“I figured I can’t teach kids to eat healthy if I looked the way I did,” said Darnell, 26, of North Bend.

Darnell underwent a rigorous, twice-daily workout, lifting weights and running on a Read more

Issaquah dentist installed as AAPD president

June 16, 2009

Dr. John Liu

Dr. John Liu

John R. Liu, DDS, founder of Eastside Pediatric Dental Group in Issaquah, was installed last month as president-elect of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry at the organization’s 62nd annual session in Hawaii.

The academy’s 7,700 members are primary oral health care providers who offer comprehensive specialty treatment for millions of infants, children, adolescents and individuals with special health care needs.
The academy is the recognized leader in children’s dental and oral health, advocating for federal funding of residency training programs for facilities serving low-income children. The academy is also in its second year of a grant to help Headstart programs connect its preschoolers to a nearby dentist who will oversee their oral health.
As president of the academy, Liu will lead the organization in developing public positions, policies and guidelines for pediatric dental health practitioners. He is already a national media spokesperson for the academy, advocating for oral health of children.
“Children should be seen by a pediatric dentist at the age of 1,” Liu said.
Educating parents about caring for their child’s oral health is as important during that initial visit as the child’s first exam, he said.
Liu has served as the academy’s vice president (2008-09), secretary-treasurer (2007-08) and trustee-at-large (2002-05). He attended dental school at Loma Linda University in California and received his pediatric dentistry certificate from Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati.
Liu opened Eastside Pediatric Dental Group in 1994. He received a Top Dentists Award from Seattle Magazine in 2006. He is a fellow of the American College of Dentists and a fellow of the Pierre Fauchard Academy.

John R. Liu, DDS, founder of Eastside Pediatric Dental Group in Issaquah, was installed last month as president-elect of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry at the organization’s 62nd annual session in Hawaii. Read more

Learn how to play it safe with summer barbecues

June 16, 2009

The American Institute for Cancer Research recommends limiting weekly consumption of red meats to no more than 18 cooked ounces. File

The American Institute for Cancer Research recommends limiting weekly consumption of red meats to no more than 18 cooked ounces. File

You dutifully apply sunscreen during the summer months, but you may not be aware of another seasonal cancer risk lurking in your own backyard: the barbecue.

A weekly burger or steak hot off the grill won’t hurt you. But if eating barbecued, grilled and smoked meats, including hotdogs, is an almost daily habit, you may want to cool it, said Dr. Paul Reilly, author and naturopathic oncologist at Seattle Cancer Treatment and Wellness Center.

Meats cooked at high temperatures, like over an open flame, contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (better known as PAHs) and heterocyclic amines (better known as HCAs), both known carcinogens, cancer-causing substances. Read more

Fenders go bumper to bumper on Front Street

June 16, 2009

By Chantelle Lusebrink     and David Hayes
Souped-up hot rods and classics go bumper to bumper at Issaquah’s Fenders on Front Street on June 21.
DownTown Issaquah Association organizers said they are hoping for good weather and plenty of patrons to help them celebrate the best of all things automotive on Father’s Day.
“I think fathers and cars always go together, and sharing it with their kids makes it that much better,” said Joe Forkner, an organizer for the event. “There is no restrictions on cars, so there will be new ones, old ones and all sorts of stuff.
“Besides, you’re not going to get through downtown very fast, so why not stick around?” he asked.
Fenders on Front Street debuted in 2005 with overwhelming participation. Nearly 800 cars lined the street and filled parking lots at XXX Rootbeer Drive-in and other restaurants, according to Forkner.
Unfortunately, it rained the second year and only about 200 cars showed. Last year, extreme heat brought only 400 participants to the show.
“But even with 400 cars, we still had 1,000 people attend,” Forkner said.
Crazy weather hasn’t stopped organizers, though, and they’re more determined than ever to put on a great show.
And this year, there are more attractions than ever.
Live music by Kaleidoscope School of Music bands Zero Side Effects, Trace, Don’t Call Me Ben, Electric Foot, Divide by Zeroes and Area 52 will provide smooth tunes to cruise to beginning at 9:20 a.m. and continuing throughout the day.
The bands will play on the Kaleidoscope stage just north of Alder and Front streets, near the Bicycle Center.
“This is the fourth year and we will feature live music all day long on our own stage,” said Charles McCrone, director for Kaleidoscope. “These student bands range in age from sixth-graders to adults, and they play a huge variety of music. It is a very great opportunity for them to show what they can do, especially since they have been practicing all winter.”
If music isn’t enough to entice you to come down for the event, how about food? The Eagles Lodge will cook breakfast and Front Street restaurants like Stan’s Bar-B-Q, Fischer Meats, Flying Pie Pizza and Front Street Café will be open to serve.
You can also cruise on through the street’s plethora of art galleries.
Jose Enciso Sr., the owner of XXX, will offer the restaurant’s classic Ford bus to shuttle weary walkers from the restaurant, Gilman Village, Dogwood and Sunset streets.
“It worked really well last year,” Forkner said. “So, we decided to bring it back as a centerpiece this year.”
For classic car owners, Forkner said the first 500 will each get commemorative dash plaques, and 10 to 12 trophies will be awarded in various categories, like top five best vehicles.
The day culminates with a parade of cars at 3 p.m., down Front Street, west on Sunset, north on Newport to state Route 900, and then back down Gilman Boulevard, when the drivers are then free to go their separate ways.
“I’m ready to see the whole of Front Street filled up with cars and not having room enough to walk down the street, because so many people came to look at them,” Forkner said. “This will really give people a chance who have never been down to Issaquah to get a chance to experience a lot of different pieces of it at one time.”
Reach Reporter Chantelle Lusebrink at 392-6434, ext. 241, or clusebrink@isspress.com. Reach Reporter David Hayes at 392-6434, ext. 237, or dhayes@isspress.com.  Comment on this story at www.issaquahpress.com.
File Issaquah’s main drag is closed to modern-day traffic and devoted to restored and classic cars and pedestrians during the Fenders on Front Street Car Show and Cruise. File

File Issaquah’s main drag is closed to modern-day traffic and devoted to restored and classic cars and pedestrians during the Fenders on Front Street Car Show and Cruise. File

Souped-up hot rods and classics go bumper to bumper at Issaquah’s Fenders on Front Street on June 21.

DownTown Issaquah Association organizers said they are hoping for good weather and plenty of patrons to help them celebrate the best of all things automotive on Father’s Day.

“I think fathers and cars always go together, and sharing it with their kids makes it that much better,” said Joe Forkner, an organizer for the event. “There is no restrictions on cars, so there will be new ones, old ones and all sorts of stuff.

“Besides, you’re not going to get through downtown very fast, so why not stick around?” he asked.

Fenders on Front Street debuted in 2005 with overwhelming participation. Nearly 800 cars lined the street and filled parking lots at XXX Rootbeer Drive-in and other restaurants, according to Forkner.

Unfortunately, it rained the second year and only about 200 cars showed. Last year, extreme heat brought only 400 participants to the show. Read more

Arts calendar

June 16, 2009

JUNE
17th
Comedy Night is at 8 p.m. at Vino Bella, 99 Front St. N. For reservations, call 391-1424. Read more

CLASS OF 2009

June 16, 2009

Senior class officers
President Courtney Lester
Vice President Katy Abel
Secretary Dan Gibbs
Treasurer Jenna Tollefson
Valedictorians
Courtney Lester,
Taryn Ohashi
Daniel Yang
Distinguished graduates
3.75 to 4.0 GPA
Kathryn Abel
Samia Ahmed
Cameron Alavi
Nathan Balkman
Molly Bankson
Nicholas Bannon
Nicole Beck
Erica Berthold
Kyle Bichich
Sarah Bonebright
Peter Brook
Terra Brown
Alexander Cartmell
Kelly Chandler
Chanwei Chang
Seung Choi
Tara Cohen
Emily Comfort
Kyle Corbitt
Emily David
Eric Do
Laura Dong
Nicole Gillett
Grayson Gillin
Jadeyn Glauser
Ariel Hagen
Kyle Hansen
Haida Ikeda
Stephen Jacobson
Karen Kim
Thomas Koho
Maxwell Kolden
Tanika Ladd
Michelle Lee
Courtney Lester
Vesal Mahanian
Heather Maurer
Emily McCuen
Kristen Meacham
Heather Morris
Erin Nicol
Katherine Nisbet
Taryn Ohashi
David Primrose
Milica Radic
Alexandra Rawlings
Elliot Rockow
Larry Schneider Jr.
Kayla Schwisow
Kimberly Sekijima
Alexander Severin
Ann-Marie Stickler
Ryan Tiernan
Deven Tokuno
Jenna Tollefson
Elaine Tran
Peter Tseng
Jade Van Wieringen
Jessica Veksler
Alexander Whan
Michael Woo
Jason Yakabu
Daniel Yang
Jordan Yip

IssaquahGrad20090609bISSAQUAH

Senior class officers

President Courtney Lester

Vice President Katy Abel

Secretary Dan Gibbs

Treasurer Jenna Tollefson

Valedictorians Read more

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