Students look at life through a digital lens

October 6, 2009

Gisela Ramirez, Carolyn Aibinder and Madison Kelly (from left) experiment with digital cameras and an autumn leaf on a ‘curious photographer’ assignment for their Maywood Middle School digital photography class. Photos by Greg Farrar

Gisela Ramirez, Carolyn Aibinder and Madison Kelly (from left) experiment with digital cameras and an autumn leaf on a ‘curious photographer’ assignment for their Maywood Middle School digital photography class. Photos by Greg Farrar

Students at Maywood Middle School are looking at life through a different lens.

Allowed to roam the school property every other day, the students in Hilary Nadell’s class are using their creative license to create pieces of art and expand their knowledge of digital photography.

“I dream of being a photographer when I grow up,” said seventh-grader Anastasiya Kostanyuk. “I like capturing the important moments in life.”

The class is offered as an elective for seventh- and eighth-graders and allows them a break from pre-algebra, Shakespeare and science experiments. Read more

Stranger approaches boy near Sunset bus stop

October 6, 2009

A 9-year-old Sunset Elementary School student was approached by a man in a vehicle he didn’t know while walking to his bus stop at 8:50 a.m. Sept. 29. Read more

Eagles get must-win victory

October 6, 2009

aylor Wyman, Issaquah junior running back, breaks away for a first-quarter touchdown to give the Eagles the early lead during the football game Oct. 2 against Eastlake.

aylor Wyman, Issaquah junior running back, breaks away for a first-quarter touchdown to give the Eagles the early lead during the football game Oct. 2 against Eastlake.

The trouble with a must-win game is that only one team can win it.

And it was the Issaquah Eagles that prevailed in the Oct. 2 game against the Eastlake Wolves with a 14-13 win in a pivotal game in the KingCo Crest league.

“Our kids played with a lot of guts tonight,” said Chris Bennett, Issaquah head coach. “It wasn’t pretty, but a lot of guts from our kids.”

Both teams made their share of mistakes, but none more heartbreaking than when Eastlake junior kicker Devon deAlteris missed an extra point in the fourth quarter.

Eastlake senior running back Cameron Hunt had just given the Wolves the lead after he broke a rush up the right sideline for a 72-yard score. DeAlteris missed the extra point, but the Wolves had the lead. Read more

Mollie Grace Nicley

October 6, 2009

Mollie Nicley

Mollie Nicley

Luke and Alicia Nicley welcomed daughter Mollie Grace to their Issaquah home Sept. 26, 2009. Read more

Mayor will teach, answer questions at highlands forum

October 6, 2009

Issaquah Highlands residents will host Mayor Ava Frisinger next week during the first of a series of planned lectures to bring together constituents and elected officials. Read more

Public Meetings

October 6, 2009

Oct. 12

Council Land Use Committee

5-8 p.m. Read more

Girls soccer teams all post victories

October 6, 2009

Soccer Roundup

Soccer Roundup

The Skyline and Issaquah high school girls soccer teams began this week locked in a first-place tie in the 4A KingCo Conference standings. That won’t be the case after Oct. 8, when the rivals meet at 7 p.m. at Skyline. Read more

Maureen McCarry touts experience as she seeks re-election

October 6, 2009

Maureen McCarry

Maureen McCarry

From efforts to build roads, to adding social services, to making city programs more eco-friendly, Maureen McCarry is immersed in details of city projects large and small. As she runs for a second full City Council term, McCarry threads information about municipal programs into conversations about her campaign.

McCarry said she is convinced Issaquah will improve as the years unfold, but she said leadership — her leadership — would be essential in the next four years as city staffers take on a docket that includes construction of a hospital in the Issaquah Highlands and a new roadway to link north and south Issaquah. Read more

Don’t let student-athlete requirements be lowered

October 6, 2009

By Sarah Wilcock
Often, the story is the same — a student too tired to concentrate because he had a game that ran late last night, a student who didn’t finish her homework because she had an extended practice and a student who does not care about his grades, just his sport.
Usually, student athletes are required to maintain a C average and told to put school first. Recently, Seattle Public Schools have been working to change that message.
Seattle Public Schools are proposing to drop the requirements for participating in sports from a C average, a 2.0, to a D average, a 1.0. By doing this, a clear message is sent to students — school isn’t as important as sports.
While sports play an essential role in high school by providing a method of exercise, giving students a passion, teaching teamwork and creating school spirit, it is undeniable that the academic side of school should take priority.
Only about 2 percent of high school athletes are awarded athletic scholarships to compete in college, according to the National Collegiate Athletic Association. In football, only 1.8 percent of NCAA students become professional athletes.
According to the NCAA Web site, “Of the student-athletes participating in sports that have professional leagues, hardly any go on to be professional athletes. In reality, student-athletes depend on academics to prepare them for life after college.”
Knowledge of a sport can’t make up for knowledge in English, math or history and a student cannot have truly learned these subjects with a D average.
At Liberty High School and other Issaquah schools, student athletes are still held to the C average; this standard helps them gain the knowledge and skills they need while still allowing them to enjoy sports. Throughout the school, there are many scholar athletes and students who continuously push themselves to a higher standard.
In one class of Calculus BC, the highest level of math offered in high school, there are four varsity football players. The class has many other scholar athletes as well, and who knows if these students would achieve as much with lower standards.
Regardless of their career paths, students still need to be well-rounded and able to positively contribute to society. A D average is too low for students to have truly learned what they need for life, and this level should not be considered acceptable.
Hall Monitor Sarah Wilcock Liberty High School

Hall Monitor Sarah Wilcock Liberty High School

Often, the story is the same — a student too tired to concentrate because he had a game that ran late last night, a student who didn’t finish her homework because she had an extended practice and a student who does not care about his grades, just his sport.

Usually, student athletes are required to maintain a C average and told to put school first. Recently, Seattle Public Schools have been working to change that message. Read more

Press Editorial

October 6, 2009

Schools foundation worth your donation

Once or twice a year, the Issaquah Schools Foundation asks the community to help it supplement Issaquah School District education funding by making a donation. Now is one of those times. Read more

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