Issaquah is a stop on book’s state ghost tour

November 10, 2009

Ghost investigation shows are saturating the television airwaves, catering to a growing fascination with hauntings.

For those wishing to find locations for the nearly departed in Washington state, a new guide has been published to lead the way — “Washington’s Haunted Hotspots.”

This is author Linda Moffitt’s first foray into writing nonfiction. The stay-at-home mom from the Olympia area researched most of the locations through the Internet, including here in Issaquah.

book-haunted-moffitt-200911“Pickering Barn I found off the Internet and learned more through word of mouth,” she said. “I did take several of these trips myself.”

In addition to describing the history of the barn belonging to the Pickering pioneer family, Moffitt included how the structure, rebuilt to match the original, gained its ghostly reputation.

“Abbie and William Castro were killed by a Snohomish Indian attack, and long ago, a young boy drowned in the local creek,” she wrote. “Electronic voice phenomenon (EVPs), orbs and electrical malfunctions have been reported on the property in and near the barn.”

Another local urban legend Moffitt wrote about was a ghostly sighting along Maple Valley Highway 169. A teenage girl can be spotted through a sudden appearance of fog. Reports are she is looking for a locket she lost after a car accident and she needs a ride home.

Moffitt admits she wasn’t able to track down every ghost story, especially if she hadn’t heard of it yet. She was surprised to learn about the successful ghost investigations that were performed in Issaquah’s Ankhasha’s Consignments (now Ankhasha’s Temple of the Western Gate) and the Depot Museum. Read more

Crafts on display

November 10, 2009

During the Pickering Barn Christmas Craft Show Nov. 5-7. a patron walks by the Secret Garden Quilts display by Olympia quilt artist Loree Ryan.

During the Pickering Barn Christmas Craft Show Nov. 5-7. a patron walks by the Secret Garden Quilts display by Olympia quilt artist Photo by Loree Ryan.

Roy Marrion Robertson Sr.

November 10, 2009

Roy Robertson Sr

Roy Robertson Sr

Roy Marrion Robertson Sr. died peacefully Nov. 5, 2009, in Enumclaw. He was 84. Read more

Math conversations gather data and reveal questions

November 10, 2009

Issaquah School District officials have hosted two high school mathematics meetings and there’s one more where you can voice your opinion. Read more

Press Editorial

November 10, 2009

Issaquah and the surrounding area make for a stunningly beautiful place to live. Leafy hillsides rise around a veritable Garden of Eden. But beauty brings responsibility. Residents must co-exist with nature’s other tenants: wildlife. Read more

Local artist added unique creations to salmon festival

November 10, 2009

A school of painted leather salmon, each one given as a gift to 2009 Salmon Days spawnsors, are shown at Issaquah Creek by the local artist, Gail Baker. Contributed

A school of painted leather salmon, each one given as a gift to 2009 Salmon Days spawnsors, are shown at Issaquah Creek by the local artist, Gail Baker. Contributed

After returning to her home state of Washington from Alaska two years ago, artist Gail Baker visited the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery and it struck a chord for her.

“The fish had traveled from here to Alaska, thousands of miles and back,” Baker said. “Migration is a common word, but when you reflect on it, it’s a miraculous phenomenon. I had migrated back to Washington. The fish had, too. Only, I flew; they swam.”

The next year, Baker weathered the rain to attend her very first Salmon Days Festival in Issaquah. She described it as more than just a carnival atmosphere; it was “a huge celebration of salmon returning one more time.” Read more

Issaquah crushes Kentwood

November 10, 2009

By Greg Farrar Grant Gellatly, Issaquah senior running back, is stopped at the half-yard line before scoring on the next play against Kentwood, as Matt Hubbard defends.

Grant Gellatly, Issaquah senior running back, is stopped at the half-yard line before scoring on the next play against Kentwood, as Matt Hubbard defends. By Greg Farrar

With the help of senior running back Grant Gellatly, the Issaquah High School Eagles cruised past the Kentwood Conquerors 42-10 Nov. 6 at Kent’s French Field in the preliminary round of the state playoffs.

Issaquah, 7-3, moves on to the first round of the 4A state tournament and meets unbeaten Jackson at 7 p.m. Nov. 14 in Everett Memorial Stadium.

The match against Kentwood marked Gellatly’s first full game, as he has battled hamstring injuries all season. He proved to be unstoppable against the Conquerors, rushing for 150 yards on 23 carries and scoring five touchdowns.

“He’s a special player,” Issaquah head coach Chris Bennett said. “It’s just nice to have him back.” Read more

Off the Press

November 10, 2009

Take in campaign season from a journalist’s eye

Warren Kagarise Press reporter

Warren Kagarise Press reporter

Election Day ended early, with a slow coast to prime time. Results were delivered in a single, anticlimactic burst at 8:15 p.m. with no nail-biting suspense. The frontrunners opened up big leads early, snuffing the chance to track trends or offer last-minute prognostications. Issaquah voters knew the make-up of the next City Council and school board well before “NCIS” was over.

Despite the quiet coda, campaign season was chockablock with memorable moments, at least for someone outfitted with a notebook and a digital voice recorder. Throughout the campaign, I jotted down observations and asides about the candidates and the race to public office.

What I observed — among the Issaquah candidates, anyway — were amicable, issue-oriented campaigns accessorized with the usual yard signs, candidate fliers and e-mail blasts. But the best — and cheapest — campaign tool I saw was the laminated placard Nathan Perea placed beside him at coffeehouses: “I’m running for Issaquah City Council. Please stop and chat!” the sign read. And it worked: Voters stopped to talk with the first-time candidate. Read more

Patriot Players debut new, clever production ‘Zap’

November 10, 2009

Audiences are in for a spectacle at Liberty High School’s premiere of “Zap” Nov. 13.

“It’s really fun and different, a new play that pokes good-natured fun at cherished theatrical forms,” Katherine Klekas, theater director for Liberty, wrote in an e-mail. “We’re always looking for something that is good but not overdone, and ‘Zap’ is quite clever and new.

“It also features a big, talented cast.”

With 27 actors playing 30 roles, your head is sure to spin. But add seven dramatic theater genres, hundreds of costumes, props and lighting cues, and you’ll be zapped into awe, Seattle Repertory Theatre’s Scott Koh, guest director for the production, said in a press release.

“I’ve collaborated with Katherine Klekas several times over the years and when this opportunity arose, it seemed like the perfect fit,” Koh wrote in an e-mail.

Liberty High School Patriot Players (from left) Casey O’Keefe, Rachel Galasso, Jonathan Julius, Jessica Queitzsch and Lindsey Vanosdoll, enact the British murder mystery scene from ‘Zap.’ By Greg Farrar

Liberty High School Patriot Players (from left) Casey O’Keefe, Rachel Galasso, Jonathan Julius, Jessica Queitzsch and Lindsey Vanosdoll, enact the British murder mystery scene from ‘Zap.’ By Greg Farrar

“‘Zap’ is a very audience-friendly play, in that it has something for everyone,” he added. “Without giving away too much of the plot, it is a fast-paced farcical comedy, where things go crazily awry. The challenge of the production has been to get really ‘good’ at being ‘bad.’”

Paul Fleischman, a Newberry Medal winner, wrote the production. Fleischman is an author of multiple poetry books for young readers and novels, like “A Fate Totally Worse Than Death” and “Sidewalk Circus.” “Zap” is his first play.

“Zap” is a combination of seven historical play genres presented on stage simultaneously.

The idea, according to Klekas, is that the audience watching the plays is given the opportunity to flip from one production to check in on another, just as one would use remote controls to change television channels.

For example, while characters are bantering about Shakespearean insults on stage during “Richard III,” other characters will be sleuthing to solve an English murder mystery based on Agatha Christie’s famous novels, while still others will arrive onstage to teleport the audience to scenes from a New York comedy with a style similar to that of Neil Simon.

“I like the hilarity of it,” said student Arielle Gordon, who plays Marsha, a pot-stirring, play-sabotaging gossip. “There are a lot of one-liners that are hilarious, and lots of actors who know how to be comedic with their bodies.” Read more

H1N1 vaccine available here, King County pharmacies

November 10, 2009

Pharmacies in King County — including the pharmacy at the Northwest Gilman Boulevard QFC — have received 15,000 doses of H1N1, or swine flu, vaccine, the local health department announced last week. Read more

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