Charlotte Capen Schwenker

November 17, 2009

Charlotte Schwenker

Charlotte Schwenker

Charlotte Capen Schwenker died Nov. 5, 2009. She was 84. Read more

To The Editor

November 17, 2009

Bicycling

Road improvement projects forgot to factor in safety for two wheelers

When I moved to Issaquah from Virginia in July 2003, one of the main attractions was the bike-friendly roads. I have been a road cyclist (“roadie”) for almost 30 years, and have ridden all kinds of roads in California, Illinois, Virginia, Maryland, Washington (D.C.), Oklahoma, Arkansas, New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, British Columbia and Washington state.

Both East Lake Sammamish Parkway and Newport Way were once very bike-friendly roads with wide, smooth shoulders. However, in recent months, “road improvements” have been done that have actually made both roads more hazardous for bikes.

In particular, the east-bound lane of Newport Way between Lakemont and state Route 900 has become very tricky for bikes. The shoulder has been greatly narrowed and grates have been placed in the middle of the shoulder, which bikes must ride over. These are very bumpy and can cause unattentive cyclists to possibly lose control.

In addition, the lanes at the entrance to the Montreaux development have been redesigned and bikes have a very narrow lane to ride. Riders also now have to deal with a concrete traffic island that has been installed at the entrance and are forced to almost ride in the road.

Also, changes are being done just to the east of Cougar Mountain, near the new condo development, the final effects of which have yet to be determined. The last half-mile to state Route 900 has also become a very fast and narrow strip of shoulder for bikes to ride, leaving very little room for maneuvering.

I feel quite competent on my bike, but the “new” Newport Way makes me a bit trepidatious. I work in Seattle and commute home during summer. I used to really enjoy the ride, but now, the last few miles are a real bear.

Bicycles are vehicles under Washington law and are entitled to ride as far right as is safe, which includes riding in a lane of traffic. The newly designed roads may move bikes off the shoulder and into the lane.

I don’t think the city or the Department of Transportation consulted cyclists or gave cyclists much consideration in the new designs.

Let’s keep Issaquah bike friendly for everyone, riders and drivers alike.

Tyler Tabor

Issaquah Read more

Sybil E. Miller

November 17, 2009

Sybil Miller

Sybil Miller

Sybil E. Miller, a former longtime Issaquah resident, of Shelton, died Nov. 9, 2009. She was 87. Read more

Who’s News

November 17, 2009

Kevin LeMond

Kevin LeMond

Kevin LeMond named IHS athlete of the month

Kevin LeMond, a senior at Issaquah High School, has been selected as the October Red Robin Scholar Athlete of the Month by the Issaquah Booster Club and Red Robin Restaurant. Read more

Scoreboard

November 17, 2009

00Prep football

4A KingCo Conference

League   Season         PF        PA

W-L       W-L                              CREST DIVISION Read more

Next steps in school district’s long-term project are under way

November 17, 2009

Issaquah School District officials and high school principals are investigating a flexible high school schedule option this year as part of their Optimal High School Experience project. Read more

Math, science aren’t the only options for smart young women

November 17, 2009

By Allison Bolgiano
When I tell people that I am interested in majoring in politics or sociology in college, I am often met with a reproachful stare.
This phenomenon is part of a larger trend in our society. Intelligent, high-achieving young women are pressured by our society into entering math and science fields. Just as the feminists wanted women to have options beyond staying at home with children, today, smart young women should not be a conveyer belt destined for only math and science.
We are attempting to overcompensate for the previous lack of women in these fields. At Liberty High School, girls can attend the Expanding Your Horizons conference or join Physettes. Both of these encourage women’s interest in math and science, with the goal of more women entering these fields. There are no special programs at Liberty to encourage students, let alone women, to enter politics.
The problem is that women are traditionally severely underrepresented in politics and business. The Council of State Governments reports that since the founding of the United States, only 28 women have served as governors. Twenty-nine states have never elected a woman as governor. The current U.S. Senate is home to only 17 women. Similarly, of CNN’s 2009 Fortune 500 Companies, only 15 are led by women. Fifteen out of 500 equals an abysmal 3 percent.
The numbers are much more promising in science, though. Women compose roughly one-third of chemists, computer scientists and math scientists, according to an RTI International study. Clearly, our efforts to increase the number of women in math and science have succeeded.
In today’s educational environment, in which women outnumber men in U.S. universities, there is no need to compel women to enter a specific field. Instead, women should be encouraged to pursue any career in which they have interest.
Hall Monitor Allison Bolgiano Liberty High School

Hall Monitor Allison Bolgiano Liberty High School

When I tell people that I am interested in majoring in politics or sociology in college, I am often met with a reproachful stare.

This phenomenon is part of a larger trend in our society. Intelligent, high-achieving young women are pressured by our society into entering math and science fields. Just as the feminists wanted women to have options beyond staying at home with children, today, smart young women should not be a conveyer belt destined for only math and science. Read more

Peter Anton Wehrle

November 17, 2009

Peter Anton Wehrle, of Issaquah, died Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2009, at Seattle Children’s. He was 17. Read more

Village Theatre presents a bold, fresh ‘Meet Me in St. Louis’

November 17, 2009

Clockwise from left, Ryah Nixon (Esther Smith), John David Scott (Lon Smith Jr.), Katie Griffith (Agnes Smith), Analiese Emerson Guettinger (Tootie Smith) and Bryan Tramontana (Rose Smith) share a scene together in Village Theatre’s production of ‘Meet Me in St. Louis.’ By Jay Koh/property of

Clockwise from left, Ryah Nixon (Esther Smith), John David Scott (Lon Smith Jr.), Katie Griffith (Agnes Smith), Analiese Emerson Guettinger (Tootie Smith) and Bryan Tramontana (Rose Smith) share a scene together in Village Theatre’s production of ‘Meet Me in St. Louis.’ By Jay Koh/property of

“Thump, thump, thump, went my heartstrings” as Village Theatre’s energetic holiday cast of “Meet Me In St. Louis” gave audiences the musical equivalent of perfection wrapped under the Christmas tree.

Drenched in dazzling lace and lush velvet dresses, women twirled about by men clad in seersucker and linen suits and a rich wood-paneled Victorian home, set close to the stage’s edge, sucked me inside the Smith family’s 1904 St. Louis home.

Scene three was barely over and I was hooked.

The show’s details are what recreate a feeling of a simpler life and time, but it’s the incredibly well-selected cast and ensemble of 26 that makes this show shine and stand apart from a beloved film, familiar to so many.

With a fresh face and bold vocals, 22-year-old Ryah Nixon returns to Village Theatre in the role of Esther Smith. Her last role at the theater was as Princess Amneris in “Aida” during the 2007-2008 season.

Reprising one of Judy Garland’s most well-known roles, Nixon’s high energy electrifies the stage and her portrayal of Smith, a young woman struck by love, is spot on and full of youth’s innocent exuberance. Read more

Winters, Cornett

November 17, 2009

Kenton and Kathleen Cornett

Kenton and Kathleen Cornett

Kathleen Nadine Winters, of Boise, Idaho, married Kenton James Cornett, of Sammamish, March 21, 2009, at Pierce Park Baptist Church in Boise.

The Rev. Dan Robinson officiated. A reception followed at Eagle Hills Country Club in Boise. Read more

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