Fireworks sales light the way for church fundraiser

August 10, 2010

By Sarah Sexton

During the Fourth of July, Issaquah Christian Church helped build houses for needy families in Mexico by selling fireworks locally.

They sold fireworks from June 28 to July 4 at the church, 10328 Issaquah-Hobart Road S.E. Profits from the sale of fireworks largely supported the church’s annual mission trip to Mexico, funded house-building materials, other outreach programs and a new facility construction program.

About $50,000 was raised with the sales, the most successful the fireworks booth has been in the past 10 years, according to the Rev. Brad Bromling, pastor of the church. The TNT fireworks company also awarded the church $250 for the best-looking presentation.

The youths and adults selling fireworks in the tent earned the money needed to fund their own trips, according to Lana Bromling, 16, Bromling’s daughter.

The church has several mission trips annually, to locations such as Africa and Haiti, so each member must raise his or her own funds to finance their trip, whether that means working on the church’s Christmas tree lot or at the fireworks stand. Parents, friends and believers in the cause may work on behalf of their children or fellow students.

Some workers also choose to designate their funds to whichever mission trip has the greatest need for money.

The group built quite a few houses to shelter people who otherwise live in crude shacks or broken-down homes the size of sheds, Lana said when describing her first trip last year. The houses are built at no cost to the residents. The group also built two small churches last year.

Each trip provides a great way for ordinary people to help those in need, serve others, make a life-changing impact on someone and experience other cultures, languages and peoples.

This year’s trip, from June 25 to July 3, by 35 people, visited a small town near Tijuana, a city approximately a mile and a half south of California.

Lana described this year’s trip as amazing and great. She and 10 other volunteers worked on a house that was being donated to a family with two children. She said she was able to speak to the families with the Spanish she’d learned in school, and she knew the most Spanish among the people on her site.

During the trip, participants slept in a flat desert campground with big green army tents each night, provided by Amor Ministries. They slept on cots bought by the church, which keeps and hands them out each year, according to Lana.

She helped another team build an additional house, and the mission teams built a total of 13 houses and one church. It took a team of 11 people to build one house, and roughly 30 people to build the church. Lana said she definitely wants to go back again next year. Her trip cost between $900 and $1,000 for herself, including the cost of a plane ticket, food and other expenses. The volunteers returned the evening of July 3.

The fireworks fundraiser has been in operation for many years. It upgraded from a stand to a huge tent two years ago, Brad Bromling said.

Sarah Sexton: 392-6434 or isspress@isspress.com. Comment at www.issaquahpress.com.

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Comments

2 Responses to “Fireworks sales light the way for church fundraiser”

  1. Chad Harvey on August 12th, 2010 3:55 pm

    This is really cool to hear. I’m a youth pastor in Salem and I had a team of 45 down there for that same week. It is encouraging to read about groups continuing to go down, even when many would say it isn’t safe. This was our 3rd trip with Amor and we had an awesome experience as well… maybe we’ll see you next year.

  2. Holiday fundraiser benefits Uganda relief effort : The Issaquah Press – News, Sports, Classifieds in Issaquah, WA on December 1st, 2010 2:00 pm

    […] church has a long tradition of using holiday fundraisers to pay for mission trips. The annual fireworks sale before Independence Day funds homebuilding projects in Mexico. // Other Stories of Interest: […]

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