Editorial

October 23, 2012

Our endorsements for state representatives

Local voters face some clear choices in the legislative races on the Nov. 6 ballot.

Issaquah is divided between the 5th and 41st legislative districts. Redistricting has changed district boundaries, but most Issaquah neighborhoods remain inside the 5th District.

North Issaquah and neighborhoods along Lake Sammamish shifted into the 41st District. Cougar Mountain west of state Route 900 and areas north of Interstate 90 act as the dividing lines.

Read more

Off the Press

October 23, 2012

Some lonely eateries deserve another look

David Hayes
Press reporter

For the hungry lunchtime crowd, Issaquah offers a smorgasbord of eating options to satisfy a craving for just about every cuisine.

To help satiate this hunger, The Issaquah Press staff writes semi-regular restaurant reviews to update diners of the newest arrivals or other options that may have been missed.

Lately, by the absence of fellow diners, we’ve discovered more than a handful of establishments that fit in the latter category. Sure, anyone can go to the established, popular joints, but there’s a lot of fine dining being missed. Let’s revisit some of these eateries that, for whatever reason, haven’t attracted the lunch crowd they deserve.

Read more

The White Board co-working center opens soon

October 23, 2012

The White Board, a co-working center, opens in Issaquah on Nov. 1.

The concept of co-working provides workspace in an open room without private offices, to encourage collaboration and community. The White Board’s co-working environment is designed to offer an alternative to the seclusion and distractions of working at home or a coffee shop.

Located in Gilman Village above The Flat Iron Grill, in Suite 29, White Board features 1,700 square feet of space with an open area for private desks and tables, and another area for casual seating for meetings and conversation.

Read more

Keep little ghouls, goblins safe on Halloween night

October 23, 2012

City officials reminded Issaquah residents and motorists to remain on the lookout for little ghosts and goblins on Halloween, Oct. 31.

Most neighborhoods turn into haunting grounds for dozens of trick-or-treating children on Halloween night, and safety is a paramount concern for parents and police.

Read more

Offer input on King County growth blueprint

October 23, 2012

King County is poised to adopt a broad blueprint for growth in unincorporated areas, and before leaders act on the plan, residents can offer input.

In a Sept. 19 decision, a King County Council committee sent the blueprint, or comprehensive plan, to the full council for consideration.

The council then plans to conduct a more in-depth review and pass the comprehensive plan by early next year.

Residents can continue to submit written testimony at the council website, www.kingcounty.gov/council. Follow the link labeled “Comprehensive Plan.”

Read more

Summertime burn bans expire as dry spell ends

October 23, 2012

State, King County and Eastside Fire & Rescue officials ended burn bans in recent days, as the wildfire risk declined after a long dry spell.

The state Department of Natural Resources ended a burn ban on agency-protected lands at midnight Oct. 15. The next day, the King County fire marshal lifted a burn ban for unincorporated King County.

EFR kept a burn ban in place until Oct. 20 for Issaquah and communities served by the agency.

Read more

Watch for signs, get help to prevent teen suicide

October 23, 2012

Lee Xie
Skyline High School

Teen suicide is the second leading cause of death in youths ages 15-25.

Suicide rates among youths have increased, and the death of these promising individuals have afflicted communities all across the nation in every demographic, leaving family and friends to mourn.

Locally, we have also lost many bright, young lives.

In Sammamish, The Christian Knudsen Life Fund was established in remembrance of 14-year-old Christian Knudsen, who took his own life this summer. It works “to help youth pastors, youth counselors and those in youth support positions to be well-prepared to truly help the lost children and families crying out for help in this situation, before it is too late.” Donations can be made at Key Bank branches or sent to  777 108th Ave. N.E., No. 1800, Bellevue, WA 98004.

Read more

King County, Seattle leaders OK arena pacts

October 23, 2012

Local leaders granted unanimous approval Oct. 15 to proceed on a Seattle sports and entertainment arena.

King County Council members approved the final memorandum of understanding and interlocal agreement among the county, Seattle and investor Chris Hansen’s ArenaCo.

The decision by the council — and the Seattle City Council’s decision to adopt the pacts the same day — is a key step in the effort to bring professional basketball and hockey teams to the region.

Read more

King County Metro Transit offers tickets to homeless riders

October 23, 2012

King County Metro Transit is poised to offer more than 41,000 additional subsidized bus tickets to community service groups.

Officials said the human services bus ticket program offers critical support for homeless people by providing a means to get to jobs, medical appointments, shelters and other services.

Funding for the program came in a mass transit package approved last year by the King County Council. The package imposed a $20 vehicle-tab fee to forestall a 17-percent reduction to mass transit countywide.

Read more

CoCoRaHS observers track rain gain

October 23, 2012

After an unseasonably nice September with pleasant skies, the rain has arrived just in time to remind locals that they live in the Pacific Northwest.

As the wet season picks up, the Office of the Washington State Climatologist at the University of Washington is seeking rainfall observers to join more than 300 volunteers across the state that measure rainfall totals through the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail & Snow Network, more commonly called CoCoRaHS.

CoCoRaHS is a grassroots volunteer network of backyard weather observers who work together to map and measure precipitation in their local communities.

“Their reports are useful for weather forecasters, climatologists, city utilities, hydrologists, and researchers, among others,” said Karin Bumbaco, the Washington state CoCoRaHS coordinator.

Read more

« Previous PageNext Page »