Issaquah native among injured at Boston Marathon

April 23, 2013

By Peter Clark

As the nation watched in horror while two bombs exploded during the Boston Marathon on April 15, killing three and injuring about 180, Issaquah residents and natives were among those affected.

According to the official registration site of the race, nine people who ran listed Issaquah as their place of residence. While one local man had a relatively calm experience, native Adrianne Haslet suffered a life-changing injury.

According to various news reports, Haslet and her husband Adam Davis ran in the marathon, only to be knocked off their feet from the second bomb that exploded a few blocks away from the finish line. She lost her left foot and hearing in her left ear from the shrapnel and impact of the explosion. Davis suffered broken bones and lacerations throughout his body.

Contributed Brian Maher had already finished the Boston Marathon, earning his best time for the 26.2 miles, when the bombs exploded April 15. It was not until he saw the empty streets and heavy military presence that he realized the severity of the situation.

Contributed
Brian Maher had already finished the Boston Marathon, earning his best time for the 26.2 miles, when the bombs exploded April 15. It was not until he saw the empty streets and heavy military presence that he realized the severity of the situation.

Haslet’s loss was especially damaging considering her career as a dance instructor. According to a family friend Kathy Landreth, the 1998 Issaquah High School graduate had moved to Boston to be closer to where her husband’s military unit was based. He had just returned from a tour in Afghanistan.

In response to her injury, Haslet’s co-worker, Nancy Hamblet, set up a fundraising website.

“We want to show Adrianne and Adam that their friends and loved ones are here for them, and will support them through the pain and suffering,” she said. “Adrianne is a dear, dear friend and incredible member of our staff. We are certain that if she wants to, she will dance again. She is one tough cookie.”

The site had raised almost $56,000 by April 22, only three days after it launched April 19. Cameron Lownie, another co-worker with the Arthur Murray Dance Studio, has helped manage the outpouring of public support.

“We started it as something we thought we could just post on the studio’s Facebook page,” he said. “We had no idea that it would be something that resonated with so many people.”

With Haslet’s desire to dance again, he said that they were unaware of either the cost for a prosthetic or what the insurance will cover.

“She’s just trying to show that they can’t take away her dancing,” he said.

Funds raised will also go to help pay for rent, car expenses, utilities and keeping the couple’s parents in Boston to assist in the recovery.

Issaquah’s Brian Maher also ran in the marathon, though he acknowledged how lucky his situation was in the face of such tragedy. In fact, he had already finished the race and was taking a nap with his wife when the bombs went off.

“I finished my fastest time I’d run in a marathon and our phones woke us up,” he said. “The news didn’t sink in all the way at first.”

He said he did not recognize the scope of the situation and he left to attend a post-marathon party. In the street, however, when he saw guards posted and military members setting up tents, he came to realize the seriousness of the situation. He described the scene as weird in the empty quiet that filled the streets, but said that it didn’t fill him with fear.

“For me, I wasn’t that afraid,” Maher said. “You just don’t know where the next bomb will be, and so if you’re going to evade it, just go somewhere less crowded. Me and my wife went to the park.”

He has lived in Issaquah for five years and has run in 14 marathons or longer distance races. When asked if the Boston experience would dissuade him from continuing to race, he said, “Oh, no, not at all.”

In fact, he plans to run in the North Olympic Discovery Marathon in June.

Visit her fundraiser to help.

 

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