Issaquah plays role in novel ‘Visits to Issaquah’

June 4, 2013

By Christina Corrales-Toy

Nathan Kositsky, the author of ‘Visits to Issaquah,’ plays the harmonica and guitar at his Snoqualmie home. Contributed

Nathan Kositsky, the author of ‘Visits to Issaquah,’ plays the harmonica and guitar at his Snoqualmie home. Contributed

It is often said that authors should write about what they know.

Snoqualmie author Nathan Kositsky takes that mantra seriously, injecting his own life experiences into his novels, including his most recent one, “Visits to Issaquah.”

“Why write about something that you don’t know anything about?” he said. “That’s being a phony, in my opinion, and there are enough phonies out there.”

It is no surprise then that the main character in the book is a psychiatrist, given that Kositsky studied psychology in college.

“Visits to Issaquah” tells the story of a psychiatrist who embarks on a personal mission of recovery and healing that brings him from San Diego to Seattle.

“It goes back and forth between Seattle and San Diego. One thing will remind you of something else and so you bounce back,” he said. “It’s not the easiest read in the world, but I love it because I really like nonlinear things.”

On the Web Nathan Kositsky’s book ‘Visits to Issaquah’ is available on Amazon.com.

On the Web
Nathan Kositsky’s book ‘Visits to Issaquah’ is available on Amazon.com.

While on this recovery in the Pacific Northwest, the psychiatrist turns his neighbors into patients without them knowing it, Kositsky said.

The reason for the necessary healing, and the move to Seattle, though, is rooted in a lost love, with the main character packing everything up in San Diego to follow her. That is where the title city comes into the story.

The woman incidentally moves to Issaquah.

“The psychiatrist kind of chases her up there,” Kositsky said. “He’s dreaming about Issaquah all the time, so he finally gets drawn to the place.”

A lot of the creative processes for the book took place while Kositsky slept.

“I would dream about the book and then I would wake up and I would write it down,” he said. “So, in that sense, it took a long time to write. I had pieces of paper all around the house.”

It was an unconventional way to write a novel, he admitted, but it gave him a vivid sense of the story.

“I write very visually,” he said. “I see the situation take place in front of me and then try and get it down on papers. I’m looking at that situation in my mind and I’m getting it down.”

The book is not an overly happy one, he said, but it does have its moments of humor, like in nearly everything he does.

Kositsky has spent most of his life in the marketing industry, where he has worked with clients from Fortune 500 companies and has earned several awards for his work.

“Visits to Issaquah” is not for everyone, but people who “like to challenge themselves,” will find particular pleasure in the novel, Kositsky said.

“It’s a smart book, so people who are coming into their own, who are intelligent, will enjoy it,” he said.

 

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