Body of man missing from Issaquah found in Everett

December 24, 2013

NEW – 9 p.m. Dec. 24, 2013

The body of Joseph Douret, who went missing from Issaquah over the weekend, was found today by Everett police, according to a post by Cathy McLain on The Seattle Times website.

Douret, 84, had Alzheimer’s disease. He left his home Saturday night to get food for dinner and never returned.

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Merry Christmas fund way below goal

December 24, 2013

Untitled 2.crtrThe volunteers at Issaquah Community Services often see families at their lowest point.

They see the anguish, the struggle and the heartbreak that comes when clients cannot make ends meet.

As hard as it is to watch that, though, they also get to see the euphoria when a volunteer says, “Yes, I can help you,” making everything worthwhile.

“It’s unbelievably rewarding, it really is. It’s just a very rich experience, I think, for all of our volunteers,” said Jane, an Issaquah Community Services volunteer whose last name is not being printed due to the required anonymity between volunteers and clients.

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Mayor Ava Frisinger leads her last council meeting

December 24, 2013

Mayor Ava Frisinger (right) and incoming mayor Fred Butler pose for a photo by a member of the audience Dec. 16, as she received a certificate of appreciation at her last City Council meeting after 28 total years as an elected official. By Peter Clark

Mayor Ava Frisinger (right) and incoming mayor Fred Butler pose for a photo by a member of the audience Dec. 16, as she received a certificate of appreciation at her last City Council meeting after 28 total years as an elected official. By Peter Clark

Mayor Ava Frisinger presided over her final Issaquah City Council meeting Dec. 16.

After 16 years as the head of Issaquah’s administration, the four-term mayor decided not to run in this year’s election. The council and city officials held a reception in her honor before the meeting. Once it began, the first 30 minutes were spent praising her and her accomplishments. Many residents attended the mayor’s send off.

Council President Fred Butler, who won the election to replace Frisinger, introduced a certificate of appreciation to honor her for overseeing Issaquah’s booming transition over the past 16 years.

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Council supports school district levies

December 24, 2013

Three Issaquah School District levies will come before voters Feb. 11. After a public hearing during its Dec. 16 regular meeting, the Issaquah City Council unanimously voted to support the ballot propositions.

Superintendent Ron Thiele and Issaquah School Board member Anne Moore gave a description of how much the levies would cost the taxpayers and how the district would spend the money.

“These three levies are absolutely critical to the level of service in our schools,” Moore said. “We have excellent Issaquah schools that are part of the community. It’s really a win-win for the city and the schools to help maintain the school level that we have.”

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Middle school land annexed to Issaquah

December 24, 2013

Less than 6 acres that encompasses Issaquah Middle School was annexed into the city by the City Council during its Dec. 16 meeting.

In a short presentation by city Long Range Planning Manager Trish Heinonen, she said school officials wanted the annexation because the school is about to undergo a massive restoration and officials want to do so under city regulations.

Upgrades of the school facilities are planned for 2014 through 2015. The proposed improvements include remodeling and expanding the existing school to become the new Clark Elementary School and Tiger Mountain Community High School.

The council held a public hearing the same night as the vote. No one stood in support of or against the annexation.

 

Spiritwood at Pine Lake’s company honored

December 24, 2013

Village Concepts, a third generation family-owned business that owns and operates retirement and assisted living communities throughout Washington state, including Issaquah’s Spiritwood at Pine Lake, was honored as a “Silver Winner” in the 2013 “Seattle Business” magazine’s Family Business Awards.

Village Concepts is one of the 13 family-owned businesses recognized in seven categories for their sense of responsibility, legacy, dedication and contribution to the local economy. Selected as a “Silver Winner” for large firms with more than 250 employees, Village Concepts was recognized at an awards gala Nov. 19.

Spiritwood at Pine Lake is located at 3607 228th Ave. S.E., Sammamish.

 

County library system director steps down

December 24, 2013

Bill Ptacek, longtime director of the King County Library System, announced Dec. 19 that he would step down to take a similar position in Alberta, Canada.

Ptacek, who has led KCLS since 1989, will leave to become CEO of the Calgary Public Library on Feb. 1.

During his 25-year tenure, Ptacek’s vision for technology and collection management kept the library system in the forefront of public libraries nationally.

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Special thanks to our many letter writers

December 24, 2013

Special thanks to our many letter writers

We’d like to take a moment to salute those people who took the time to write a letter to the editor in 2013. Their written voice provokes, challenges, encourages and thereby builds a stronger community for us all. We aren’t able to publish every letter we receive, but here’s a list of the 148 authors, in alphabetical order, who did get ink this year.

 

Dan Anderson

Glenn Anderson

Steve Balkman

Michael T. Barr

Matthew Barry

David Baty Read more

To the Editor

December 24, 2013

Photo headline

Respect knows no gender, race or political party

The Issaquah Press photo headline, Republican respect, referring to Congressman Reichert’s visit to Issaquah Middle School was shocking.

I was taught, and as a teacher I taught children, that respect knows no gender, race, religion, sexual orientation and certainly no political party.

I trust that teachers and parents are reinforcing that basic life lesson, especially for those Issaquah Middle School students who eagerly looked for themselves in the front-page photo where the headline jumped out at them.

Any number of headlines could have captured the essence of the congressman’s visit without furthering the political divide that is crippling our country. Congressman Reichert, I trust, was not invited to Issaquah Middle School because of his political affiliation. That would be blatantly inappropriate in a public school. I again trust that the congressman was invited because he had a message that resonates with young people struggling to make appropriate choices.

I expect better from The Issaquah Press.

Margo Campbell

Issaquah

Plastic bags

Change your mind and think outside the bag

I was amazed when I read two letters in the Nov. 20 issue about the bag ban. Did Ms. Cardozo and Mr. Sessler even read what they wrote?

Ms. Cardozo explained the absolute need for produce bags to carry a variety of things. I don’t know where she gets her sushi, but mine comes in a hard-shell container, which is recyclable. Meat & chicken? Rarely do I see a package leaking, and only then would I add more plastic. Ice cream? It won’t melt in her 15 minutes’ drive home! Produce? Very little actually needs a plastic bag.

No one she has spoken with thinks the ban is a good idea? Perhaps she’s talking to the wrong folks. Then, she “tosses five or more” of these produce bags. She should know that Waste Management says produce bags are code 4 recyclable! So, yes, she saves nothing; what a shame.

Mr. Sessler stated he has witnessed people carrying and dropping things on their way to the car, spending “minutes” just to escape the bag fee? Maybe these folks are environmentally conscious but clumsy. I’ve carried unbagged items to my car for years, even dropped a few. I’ve even made a clerk remove items from a bag because it’s the right thing to do. If I’m absent-minded enough to leave my bags in the car — wow, what a burden it is to retrieve them!

These are not reasons for wasting plastic! Perhaps a frame of mind change is in order — think outside the bag. The bag ban was the right thing to do, and I hope my fellow Issaquahnians make the right choice and keep our town moving forward. Oh, and by the way, I can’t vote either as a county resident.

Geoff Carson

Issaquah

 

Klahanie

Vote yes to annexation by Issaquah

Efforts by Sammamish to encourage opposition to annexation by Issaquah are not in our best interest.

Sammamish cannot serve us better than King County does now. They just want our tax revenue! Sammamish has little commercial tax revenue, placing much of the city’s costs on its residents.

Plus, annexation by Sammamish is not a default option if you vote no on annexation to Issaquah. State annexation laws are such that a no vote will just leave us in King County, where we will continue to be obligated for King County debt, rather than Issaquah debt. City/county debt is not an issue in this election! Vote no and our tax dollars will continue to be spent in Seattle and other parts of King County.

Annexation by Issaquah, according to neutral, third-party analysis, will save taxpayers over $850/year in property tax on a $500,000 home. Our tax dollars will stay in our community and be managed locally where we can have a greater say in how that money is spent.

Issaquah was incorporated in 1892 and has a well-established government and police department. We will receive better police protection, and road and park maintenance. Eastside Fire & Rescue will serve us as they always have, while our utilities, including Sammamish water will stay the same. Our addresses have always been Issaquah addresses. We have been part of the Issaquah community for decades. It’s about time we become official residents of Issaquah.

Understand the facts and consequences. Support annexation by Issaquah. They have done due diligence to make sure they can take good care of us. They want to serve our needs and for less cost to us than King County or Sammamish. Let’s vote yes to be part of Issaquah for all the right reasons, because all the reasons are right!

Korina Sullivan

Issaquah

Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus

December 24, 2013

In 1897, Dr. Philip O’Hanlon was asked by his then 8-year-old daughter Virginia whether Santa Claus really existed. O’Hanlon suggested she write to The Sun, a prominent New York City newspaper at the time.

Virginia’s letter, reprinted here, became the introduction to an editorial in The Sun. Merry Christmas, one and all!

Dear Editor,

I am 8 years old. Some of my little friends say there is no Santa Claus. Papa says, “If you see it in The Sun, it’s so.” Please tell me the truth. Is there a Santa Claus?

Virginia O’Hanlon

115 W. Ninety-Fifth St.

 

VEditorialSantaArt 20131200 copyIRGINIA, your little friends are wrong. They have been affected by the skepticism of a skeptical age. They do not believe except what they see. They think that nothing can be which is not comprehensible by their little minds. All minds, Virginia, whether they be men’s or children’s, are little. In this great universe of ours man is a mere insect, an ant, in his intellect, as compared with the boundless world about him, as measured by the intelligence capable of grasping the whole of truth and knowledge. Read more

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