Geese likely won’t be killed at state park this year

February 4, 2014

By Christina Corrales-Toy

The geese that roam Lake Sammamish State Park are likely safe this year, according to Virginia Painter, spokeswoman for Washington State Parks.

State park officials killed about 90 birds last summer to control the population and mitigate any harmful effects their feces may cause. So far, there are no plans to kill any at the local park this year, Painter said.

A Canada goose balances on one leg, preening among a flock of seagulls recently as one more gull glides in for a landing on Sunset Beach at Lake Sammamish State Park.  By Greg Farrar

A Canada goose balances on one leg, preening among a flock of seagulls recently as one more gull glides in for a landing on Sunset Beach at Lake Sammamish State Park.
By Greg Farrar

“Managers don’t foresee us doing a lethal solution at Lake Sammamish State Park this year,” she said.

The state agency never “plans” to employ lethal measures, though, Painter said. The decision-making process for such an action requires constant assessing.

The approach is always to try nonlethal options first, Painter said. The Humane Society of the United States suggests alternatives such as limiting flock growth, frightening geese (humanely) so they decide to leave on their own and changing the habitat so it isn’t attractive to them.

The birds were killed last year due to public health concerns over the park’s growing population of geese and the feces they produce.

The news that the geese likely won’t be harmed was comforting to hear, Klahanie resident Diane Weinstein said.

“I was just really happy that state parks decided to do the right thing,” she said.

Weinstein volunteered with a Seattle group committed to stopping the practice of geese killing more than a decade ago and was again a vocal advocate for the birds when she heard about what happened at Lake Sammamish State Park.

 

 

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Comments

One Response to “Geese likely won’t be killed at state park this year”

  1. Wendy on February 5th, 2014 7:47 pm

    What about locating the nearby nests and “shaking” the eggs? Or employing dogs to just chase them off?

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