Mustafa Masud is named to honor roll

March 25, 2014

Mustafa S. Masud, of Issaquah, has been named to the honor roll at Phillips Academy in Andover, Mass., for the winter term.

Caitlin Doxsie makes dean’s list

Caitlin Doxsie, of Issaquah, was named to the dean’s list at The University of Puget Sound for the fall 2013 semester.

 

New Eastside Friends of Seniors director sees vision come true

March 25, 2014

Retired transportation economist and Redmond City Councilman Hank Myers is the new director of the volunteer organization Eastside Friends of Seniors.

He was doing volunteer work in his community when he proposed the idea of creating a nonprofit organization to help seniors maintain their independence by providing essential services that allow them to remain in their own homes.

“My friend said that agency already exists,” Myers recalled. “That’s when she told me about Eastside Friends of Seniors.”

The organization operates out of offices in the basement of Mary, Queen of Peace Catholic Church on the Sammamish Plateau.

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Lying with legends

March 18, 2014

Local barbecuer is immortalized on quilt

Throughout the ages, tribute to the greats have been immortalized in art of all genres — Abraham Lincoln has his 98-foot sculpture at the center of the Washington, D.C., memorial; Gilbert Stuart’s unfinished painting, the portrait “Athenaeum” of George Washington in the National Gallery of Art; and the godfathers of competition barbecue in a quilt.

The original of the latter was bought at auction for $800 at the 2013 National Barbecue Association trade show. But a copy of the quilt, featuring digitized images of 16 of the earliest and most honored barons of barbecue, can be found atop Bob Lyon’s bed.

Photos by David Hayes Bob Lyon, of Issaquah, stands over a quilt featuring his and other likenesses of barbecue legends. Atop his bed is the only place big enough to fully display the 71/2-by 6-foot quilt in his appartment in the Timber Ridge at Talus retirement community.

Photos by David Hayes
Atop Bob Lyon’s bed is the only place big enough to fully display the 71/2-by 6-foot quilt in his appartment in the Timber Ridge at Talus retirement community.

“It’s the only place big enough in our apartment to display it,” Lyon said.

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Espionage and coal: Mining Issaquah’s World War I history

March 18, 2014

It was July 29, 1914. Austria launched a bomb attack on Serbia, and Russia commenced mobilization for an attack on Austria. The German “Count” Gustav Konstantin Alvo von Alvensleben was in Germany, where the government was about to declare war on France and Russia.

On that same day, in the small town of Issaquah, Dave and Ann Morgan welcomed their first child, Ivor, into the world. He was born in coal company housing owned by von Alvensleben.

File This is most likely an occasion described in a Seattle Times article from July 19, 1013, which read in part, ‘Two hundred fuel dealers and their wives... were the guests of the Issaquah & Superior Coal Mining Company at its mines in Issaquah... The trip was made in a special train of three cars that left King Street Station at 9:30.’ The article describes the procession from the Issaquah Depot to the mine offices, where Issaquah Mayor P.J. Smith gave a rousing speech. The coal company’s sales manager, J. F. Grant, replied with the interesting (if not true) fact that Issaquah meant ‘beautiful maiden,’ whereupon he welcomed Blodwyn Watkins, ‘the pretty daughter of Superintendent J. R. Watkins, dressed in Indian costume, who emerged from a stand erected for the purpose.’

File
This is most likely an occasion described in a Seattle Times article from July 19, 1013, which read in part, ‘Two hundred fuel dealers and their wives… were the guests of the Issaquah & Superior Coal Mining Company at its mines in Issaquah… The trip was made in a special train of three cars that left King Street Station at 9:30.’ The article describes the procession from the Issaquah Depot to the mine offices, where Issaquah Mayor P.J. Smith gave a rousing speech. The coal company’s sales manager, J. F. Grant, replied with the interesting (if not true) fact that Issaquah meant ‘beautiful maiden,’ whereupon he welcomed Blodwyn Watkins, ‘the pretty daughter of Superintendent J. R. Watkins, dressed in Indian costume, who emerged from a stand erected for the purpose.’

While von Alvensleben made plans to return to North America, Dave Morgan tended donkeys for von Alvensleben’s Issaquah and Superior Coal Mine on the west side of town. The donkeys hauled carts of coal from the dark, dusty, noisy and wet depths of the mines to the surface, where the coal was crushed, sorted and cleaned in preparation for shipment.

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Opening the archives

March 18, 2014

An ongoing look at memorable images from Issaquah’s past

78.059.004 Interior Issaquah State Bank, 1914 p39, #57 Arcadia book caption:  The interior of the Bank of Issaquah was rich with detail. Note the art deco trim along the ceiling. The building was known as one of the most sophisticated in Issaquah. Its current appearance is due to a renovation in the 1940s, which covered up its ornate detailing. By the time this picture was taken in 1914, the bank had changed hands and had become the Issaquah State Bank.

78.059.004
Interior Issaquah State Bank, 1914
p39, #57 Arcadia book caption:
The interior of the Bank of Issaquah was rich with detail. Note the art deco trim along the ceiling. The building was known as one of the most sophisticated in Issaquah. Its current appearance is due to a renovation in the 1940s, which covered up its ornate detailing. By the time this picture was taken in 1914, the bank had changed hands and had become the Issaquah State Bank.

The Issaquah History Museums take requests regarding what people would like to see in the Digital Collection. Roughly quarterly, volunteers have a data-entry day and prep a bunch of records for upload. If there is a particular name, place or item you’d like to see more images of on the website, email Erica Maniez at .orgerica.maniez@issaquahhistory. If you have a photo or subject you would like to see in this feature, email editor@isspress.com

Maywood Kiwanis Builders Club helps children, seniors

March 18, 2014

The latest addition to the Kiwanis Club of Issaquah family is the Maywood Middle School Kiwanis Builders Club.

The chartering of the Maywood Builders Club was initiated two years ago by Key Clubber Lisa Antonio, currently lieutenant governor of PNW Key Club Division 28. It took two years to find a faculty adviser, Samantha Neff.

With her leadership, the Kiwanis Maywood Builders Club recently engaged Kiwanis and Key Club with the project of making hospital dolls for Seattle Children’s. Doctors use the dolls to explain medical procedures by drawing the procedure on a doll, which is then given to the patient.

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Lauren Davis named project director

March 11, 2014

Lauren Davis, 2005 graduate of Issaquah High School, has been named project director for University of Washington’s Husky Help & Hope Program.

Lauren Davis

Lauren Davis

The program is made possible by a $300,000 grant awarded to University of Washington and Forefront to modernize approaches to suicide prevention at the Seattle Campus.

Davis serves on several King County boards aimed at preventing suicide and improving mental health. She has worked for suicide prevention since a childhood friend took his own life in high school. She previously worked as an international development consultant for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and was a Fulbright scholar in Ghana.

Earned privilege

March 11, 2014

In a life of milestones, local author meets another with self-published book

Sitting in a ray of sunshine in his “hooray for me” room in his Cougar Mountain home, Randy Harrison paused while discussing his book “West From Yesterday.”

From the window seat in the room (a Southern nickname for a room full of mementos from one’s life), the first-time author said he had shared the manuscript with family and friends before self-publishing it through Amazon.com. They’d realized the tale of Tucker, a post-Civil War-era plantation owner who journeys West in a bout of self-discovery, sounded a lot like someone they knew.

By David Hayes Randy Harrison, author of ‘West from Yesterday’ stands in his Cougar Mountain home’s ‘hooray-for-me’ room where he’s planning his next project — teaching himself to play guitar.

By David Hayes
Randy Harrison, author of ‘West from Yesterday’ stands in his Cougar Mountain home’s ‘hooray-for-me’ room where he’s planning his next project — teaching himself to play guitar.

“They said they found a lot of me in Tucker,” Harrison said. “I realized both me and Tucker were from a Virginia family, had come from a life of privilege only by birth. And we both felt a sense of obligation that we had to earn what comes from that gift of privilege.”

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Local teens prepare for ‘Spamalot’ this weekend

March 11, 2014

Teenagers from local high schools are preparing for their production of “Spamalot” through 5th Avenue Theatre’s Rising Star Project.

The yearly project allows high school students from Washington to gain firsthand experience of professional theatrical productions, including promoting and performing.

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Cougar Ridge principal to retire at year’s end

March 11, 2014

Jackie Patten, principal at Cougar Ridge Elementary School, announced Feb. 28 that she will retire at the end of the 2013-14 school year.

Patten has worked in education for 40 years, and said in an email to families that she has enjoyed working with an “outstanding community” at Cougar Ridge.

“It is truly a privilege to be ending my career in education at such a remarkable school,” Patten wrote. “Serving as an educator is a very rewarding profession.”

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