Editorial — School begins with need for volunteers

August 26, 2014

On Tuesday, parents across the Issaquah School District will walk their children to the school bus or to school for the start of a new school year.

Finally, a bit of free time for a second cup of coffee.

But wait, your school needs you. The volunteer jobs at school are endless. The playground needs monitors, the library can use assistance, the front office might need your organizational skills, teachers almost never have enough helpers and the nurse’s office is often in need of a mother’s touch to watch over a sick child.

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Off The Press — Traffic plan can’t come soon enough

August 26, 2014

Rowley Properties’ construction of the long-stay Homewood Suites by Hilton has brought a massive crane to central Issaquah.

Peter Clark Press reporter

Peter Clark
Press reporter

It’s not the first one locals have seen, but it heralds the start of the Central Issaquah Plan, which city officials expect to change the face of the valley over the next 30 years or so.

The crane stands over the western edge of the city and so will hopefully not have any impact on surrounding traffic. However, it represents a symbol of things to come as parcels go on sale and some, like the Atlas project on Gilman Boulevard Northwest, sit in the middle of the permitting process.

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Guest Column — Great schools, great communities and you

August 26, 2014

Issaquah schools are great — there’s no doubt about it. Our district is consistently ranked as one of the top in the state and our students’ test scores are among the best in the nation. Ask any real estate agent and he or she will regale you with tales of parents who relocated just so their kids can get an Issaquah education.

What is less apparent is how our schools continue to be world-class centers for learning. Much credit goes to our teaching staff and fiscally savvy administration. An equal measure belongs to the community — parents, residents and businesses who donate to the Issaquah Schools Foundation, join our PTSAs and volunteer in our schools.

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To the Editor

August 26, 2014

IMS principal

Welcome back, Mr. Adams; we anticipate your leadership

Growing up, I loved to watch “Welcome Back, Kotter” on TV. The humor spoke to me; Freddy, Epstein, Horshack and Barbarino were such fun to watch; and the honesty and integrity Mr. Kotter carried himself with at home and as a teacher was admirable even to an 11-year-old.

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Editorial — The kids are (probably) all right

August 19, 2014

Sometime soon, some area parents will get a pair of letters. One is a federally mandated notice informing them their child’s school is failing. The other, likely included in the same envelope, will tell them not to worry about what the first letter says — things are just fine.

The mixed message will undoubtedly confuse some.

Here we are: 2014 was the year that every child in America was supposed to be at grade level standard in math and reading, according to the federal No Child Left Behind law.

The idea was well-meaning, but obviously flawed. While pretty much everyone agrees the law needs revisions, revisions mean Congress needs to get involved. Since Congress can barely agree on the color of the sky, it’s unlikely to see revisions any time soon.

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Off The Press — Recent sightings of the ridiculous

August 19, 2014

I didn’t know a 23rd century, high-tech war was being waged in my armpits on my behalf by the cosmetics industry, but apparently it is.

For years, it’s just been the same ol’ deodorant scent for yours truly, Old Spice High Endurance Arctic Force. I think it smells good. The red plastic container is easy to find in the grocery aisle. Period. And I’m a guy. I don’t need directions for using deodorant, right? I never read the fine print on the back, until just recently:

Contains odor-fighting “Atomic Robots” that “Shoot Lasers” at your “Stench Monsters” and replaces them with fresh, clean, masculine “Scent Elves.”

Whoa!

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To the Editor

August 19, 2014

Off The Press

Who is the government  really working for?

Very interesting article from the viewpoint of a current nonhomeowner looking to purchase a home in the current market, the reasons why he and his wife want to purchase a home in Seattle at this time, and the problems they see.

One constantly hears about the government wanting the cost of housing to rise, and the government continues policy to create this “bubble.” This is great for the real estate lobby, government expansion and investors looking to make a quick profit.

For current renters, first-time buyers and market stability, this market distortion works against these interests. The problem with housing is that homes cost too much, not too little, and this hurts responsible people looking to get ahead in life.

When government creates bubbles, decisions are made for the wrong reasons. The next time the government says it is doing things to help you, think about whom it is really working for. Usually, it is for votes and money.

Greg Larson

Issaquah

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Editorial: Did ballot envelope issue deter voters?

August 12, 2014

Remember how simple voting used to be? You would drive or walk to your neighborhood voting place, sign in, get your ballot, go to the private voting area, drop your ballot in the secure box and be on your way. That wasn’t simple enough or possibly cost effective enough for King County, so we now have all mail-in voting.

In the recent primary election “some” (undisclosed number) return envelopes for ballots were found to be already sealed when voters opened the voting packets sent to them by King County Elections. That “some” was significant enough for King County Elections to send out a press release July 25 to the media in hopes of informing voters of the potential issue.

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Off The Press — Election envelopes create sticky situation

August 12, 2014

Like any responsible procrastinator I pride myself at waiting to the very last minute to complete any task. So, on election eve, realizing this was the last chance to exercise my right to vote in the primary, I finally opened the envelope from King County Elections that had been sitting on my kitchen table for at least a month.

With a sense of duty I read through the names on my ballot and filled in the corresponding oval as neatly as a person with zero small motor skills possibly could. I progressed rather quickly, coming finally to the list of people running for the judge position. Like most voters I know nothing about any of these people so I did what I always do…voted for the person whose name seemed the most normal.

Joe Heslet

Joe Heslet

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To the Editor

August 12, 2014

Traffic

People need to learn the difference between yield and merge

One of the reasons southbound traffic backs up on Front Street during evening rush hour is that drivers on Newport Way ignore the yield sign. (Please note, it reads: yield, not merge).

During the red light cycle on Newport, the cars on Front Street have the right of way. If Newport Way was posted no turn on red, it would allow traffic on each street a fair portion of the allotted time, and a smoother flow of traffic. This “no turn” sign could be limited to the hours of 3-7 p.m., which appears to be the most congested time period.

George Short

Issaquah

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