To the Editor

June 10, 2014

Lost dog

Thanks to all who helped Kiki get home

On June 1, our dachshund Kiki bolted from a friend’s house. We spent the day searching for her near Inglewood Hill. By 10 p.m., we were in despair — would she know to stay off the street, avoid predators, find food and water? We live in Issaquah, so it seemed Kiki’s chances of returning, or even surviving the night, were low.

We spent Monday putting up flyers, but failed to find her. Neighbors encouraged us, took flyers and said they’d help.

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World War II veterans deserve honor, respect

June 10, 2014

A special thanks to those who turned out for the D-Day ceremony at Veterans’ Memorial Field on June 6.

People were thrilled to see three P-51 Mustangs soar over the field twice, coming lower the second time to give people a closer look at the intricately painted planes.

There were more than 50 veterans in attendance, many from World War II. Several of them had tears in their eyes as they watched the planes.

Kathleen R. Merrill Press managing editor

Kathleen R. Merrill
Press managing editor

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Editorial: Bond ratings are good news

June 10, 2014

City and school district leaders should be applauded. While the story is the sort that many readers just gloss over, local taxpayers are set to save a bundle of money as a result of recent developments.

The city of Issaquah and the Issaquah School District both recently had their bond ratings upgraded. The city’s rating was bumped up to AAA — the highest possible — by Standard & Poor’s, while the district’s was raised to AA+ by the same agency.

Ratings are determined only after the rating agency goes over the fiscal policies of an agency with a fine-tooth comb. They look at financial management, assets, existing debt and budgeting assumptions.

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To the Editor

June 3, 2014

Housing development

Buy houses that are for  sale before building more

So, 100-plus houses are going to be built next to Discovery Elementary School on 228th Street.

With the sudden clear-cutting of trees next to the park and ride, the surge in development is obvious. The destruction of trees should be the first concern. Trees improve our health, are part of history and support wildlife.

Another concern is road capacity. Drive on 228th at 7 a.m. or 5 p.m. to see the traffic backlog. The street is now supposed to absorb 100-plus additional families coming on and off the road as the two new developments are created? There has to be a point where the City Council, planning commission and citizens agree enough is enough.

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Editorial: Be cautious as weather warms up

June 3, 2014

History tells us this weather is a trick. Soon enough, the June gloom will set in and take hold until July 4.

But if this lovely weather holds (and even if it doesn’t) many Western Washingtonians will head outside, braving the cold waters and muddy hiking trails.

Please, don’t let the sun lull you into contentment. As we learned last week on Mount Rainier, even experienced outdoor people with professional guides can get into trouble.

While most of us won’t be scaling mountains, it’s important to keep safety in mind no matter what your activity.

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Off The Press – Sick of the fantasy

June 3, 2014

I cannot wait for all the boring nonfiction I will read this summer.

As I have bragged about here, I ran another marathon last month. Needing 18 weeks of training, I decided to return one last time to the “Wheel of Time” fantasy series, written by Robert Jordan. I started the 14-book saga when I was 15, reading it with my father.

Over the years, we have both gone back to reread it as new books in the series are released. With the last book released in 2014, I decided it would make for an interesting path to listen to the 13 books I previously read while running and then read the final book to close this long chapter of my life. This decision left me with two realizations.

Peter Clark Press reporter

Peter Clark
Press reporter

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Off The Press

May 27, 2014

Manage the risk,  don’t avoid it

Joe Grove Press reporter

Joe Grove
Press reporter

With spring weather quietly coming in “on little cat feet,” more motorcycles are disrupting the silence. In another month, they will be thicker than fleas on a hog’s back.

As they roar, whine or putt putt(depending on the type), wiping out the delightful sounds of birds, frogs and crickets, a spouse or mother somewhere is arguing, to usually no avail, with a loved one about buying one of these death traps.

Rather than fight this losing battle, which will leave everyone feeling badly, why not take the risk management approach? With a little education, the risk can almost be eliminated, which is more than you can say for many other adrenaline producing sports.

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To the Editor

May 27, 2014

 

The Issaquah Press

Thank you for a great  community newspaper

Thank you for publishing a newspaper that I have enjoyed reading for more than 40 years. This may be a bittersweet email, though, because after subscribing to The Issaquah Press for many years, I must tell you that I am not renewing my subscription.

I believe that The Press is still a great community newspaper — but I’m just not as active in Issaquah as I once was.

While I grew up in town and was a member of Issaquah Rotary for more than 20 years, my wife and I live in Seattle, and that’s where we’re more active.

So, best wishes on the continued publication of The Issaquah Press. I’m sure that I’ll check-in from time-to-time via the online version and when I’m out for various community events such as Salmon Days. Thank you for producing a great community newspaper.

Ed Bronsdon

Seattle

 

Teachers

If you think you can do   better, go ahead and try

I ( a teacher for many years who certainly didn’t do it for the money) recently heard an NPR news interview concerning preschool children being sent home due to behavior and not allowed to return to school. The reporter was upset that the school district — California was being skewered in this particular interview — was unwilling to serve these poor children.

Did she mention class size? Whether those teachers had any adult help with behavior issues? The kinds of behaviors that caused the children to be sent home? A need to provide districts with funding for additional personnel? Well, no.

This outsider went on to cite statistics regarding the high number of ethnic preschoolers being sent home in relation to the lower percentage of white preschoolers. Moreover, she suggested this discrepancy was due to racial bias on the part of the preschool teachers. What?

Does she personally know any preschool teachers, especially teachers biased against their nonwhite students? Did she look into a possible correlation between poverty and behavior issues? Whether poverty in the U.S. is more often found in nonwhite families? That many families are so stressed about their situation and are working so many hours to make ends meet that they have little time for teaching social skills? Well, no again.

I am sick to the bone of hearing about the failures of our teachers, our schools. Schools are now expected to provide before and after care, to feed, counsel, entertain students. Oh, and get great test scores out of them, as well. Teachers are grading papers in the evening, planning lessons on weekends, attending after-school events.

My wish? I wish every teacher would resign his/her job and leave the complainers to deal with the issues of educating children. The well needs to run dry!

Donna Manion

Issaquah

 

Editorial

May 27, 2014

Many people came out to celebrate and remember veterans at ceremonies across the area on Memorial Day.

But the men and women who served or died in military service to their country should be remembered and honored all year.

Members of our military are still fighting and dying in remote areas all around the world.

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Editorial

May 20, 2014

Bike, cars can get along better

May 16 was Bike to Work Day, and thousands of two-wheeled commuters took to the road. The mere thought of a cyclist can start some drivers’ blood boiling, and cyclists, too, find themselves frustrated by inconsiderate motorists.

Bikes on the roads are here to stay, and indeed, if current trends hold, will be an ever-growing presence. More work must be done to help bikes and cars co-exist, and two of the biggest missing ingredients are predictability and education.

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