Editorial – Good luck, graduates; welcome to adulthood

June 17, 2014

Since kindergarten, you schlepped books to and from school. You were expected to learn the basics: reading, writing and arithmetic. You hopefully learned how to share, how to make friends, and how to become part of a social and cultural group.

Perhaps you were fortunate enough to delve into extracurricular activities like art, choir, playing an instrument, drama, sports, debate or yearbook staff. Most importantly, you hopefully learned to be an individual in a sea of sameness, as well as how to be a critical thinker.

For some, high school goes down as the best times of life — the camaraderie, close friendships, being part of a team.

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Ten years of advice at the speed of light

June 17, 2014

In keeping with the tradition of previous years, this is the condensed, edited commencement speech I heard from a student or adult at graduation that, in my opinion, stood out from the rest. Enjoy!

— Greg Farrar

 

Tom Haff, Faculty Speaker

Physics teacher

Issaquah High School

 

Hey, gang. This is going to be really hard for me, because they only gave me six minutes.

Let’s say that you stepped outside of Key Arena and you traveled close to the speed of light, like 99.99999 percent the speed of light, for those six minutes, and you came back still wearing your cap and gown. But the earth’s clock will have gone by for 10 years. I calculated those.

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To the Editor

June 17, 2014

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Salmon Days logo

Issaquah Press masthead took me back to glorious days

I love The Issaquah Press logo of the June 11 edition and its celebration of the new Salmon Days logo.

Seeing it reminded me of the glorious days of the ‘60s and ‘70s when everyone, it seemed, took a stand on important social issues; where student activism helped to end a war, environmental awareness led to a bipartisan vote to establish the Environmental Protection Agency (imagine, brought to us by a Republican President — Nixon — and ratified by the House and the Senate, ah, the days). Women started seeing themselves as more than just window-dressing and demanded equal treatment, and the whole concept of healthy, sustainable living was nurtured.

Let’s hope the new logo inspires similar activism and continues to broaden our vision of what we can achieve.

Kathy Swoyer

Issaquah

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To the Editor

June 10, 2014

Lost dog

Thanks to all who helped Kiki get home

On June 1, our dachshund Kiki bolted from a friend’s house. We spent the day searching for her near Inglewood Hill. By 10 p.m., we were in despair — would she know to stay off the street, avoid predators, find food and water? We live in Issaquah, so it seemed Kiki’s chances of returning, or even surviving the night, were low.

We spent Monday putting up flyers, but failed to find her. Neighbors encouraged us, took flyers and said they’d help.

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World War II veterans deserve honor, respect

June 10, 2014

A special thanks to those who turned out for the D-Day ceremony at Veterans’ Memorial Field on June 6.

People were thrilled to see three P-51 Mustangs soar over the field twice, coming lower the second time to give people a closer look at the intricately painted planes.

There were more than 50 veterans in attendance, many from World War II. Several of them had tears in their eyes as they watched the planes.

Kathleen R. Merrill Press managing editor

Kathleen R. Merrill
Press managing editor

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Editorial: Bond ratings are good news

June 10, 2014

City and school district leaders should be applauded. While the story is the sort that many readers just gloss over, local taxpayers are set to save a bundle of money as a result of recent developments.

The city of Issaquah and the Issaquah School District both recently had their bond ratings upgraded. The city’s rating was bumped up to AAA — the highest possible — by Standard & Poor’s, while the district’s was raised to AA+ by the same agency.

Ratings are determined only after the rating agency goes over the fiscal policies of an agency with a fine-tooth comb. They look at financial management, assets, existing debt and budgeting assumptions.

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To the Editor

June 3, 2014

Housing development

Buy houses that are for  sale before building more

So, 100-plus houses are going to be built next to Discovery Elementary School on 228th Street.

With the sudden clear-cutting of trees next to the park and ride, the surge in development is obvious. The destruction of trees should be the first concern. Trees improve our health, are part of history and support wildlife.

Another concern is road capacity. Drive on 228th at 7 a.m. or 5 p.m. to see the traffic backlog. The street is now supposed to absorb 100-plus additional families coming on and off the road as the two new developments are created? There has to be a point where the City Council, planning commission and citizens agree enough is enough.

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Editorial: Be cautious as weather warms up

June 3, 2014

History tells us this weather is a trick. Soon enough, the June gloom will set in and take hold until July 4.

But if this lovely weather holds (and even if it doesn’t) many Western Washingtonians will head outside, braving the cold waters and muddy hiking trails.

Please, don’t let the sun lull you into contentment. As we learned last week on Mount Rainier, even experienced outdoor people with professional guides can get into trouble.

While most of us won’t be scaling mountains, it’s important to keep safety in mind no matter what your activity.

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Off The Press – Sick of the fantasy

June 3, 2014

I cannot wait for all the boring nonfiction I will read this summer.

As I have bragged about here, I ran another marathon last month. Needing 18 weeks of training, I decided to return one last time to the “Wheel of Time” fantasy series, written by Robert Jordan. I started the 14-book saga when I was 15, reading it with my father.

Over the years, we have both gone back to reread it as new books in the series are released. With the last book released in 2014, I decided it would make for an interesting path to listen to the 13 books I previously read while running and then read the final book to close this long chapter of my life. This decision left me with two realizations.

Peter Clark Press reporter

Peter Clark
Press reporter

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Off The Press

May 27, 2014

Manage the risk,  don’t avoid it

Joe Grove Press reporter

Joe Grove
Press reporter

With spring weather quietly coming in “on little cat feet,” more motorcycles are disrupting the silence. In another month, they will be thicker than fleas on a hog’s back.

As they roar, whine or putt putt(depending on the type), wiping out the delightful sounds of birds, frogs and crickets, a spouse or mother somewhere is arguing, to usually no avail, with a loved one about buying one of these death traps.

Rather than fight this losing battle, which will leave everyone feeling badly, why not take the risk management approach? With a little education, the risk can almost be eliminated, which is more than you can say for many other adrenaline producing sports.

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