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February 21, 2014

A Deeper Well, Christian Discussion Group

American Association of University Women

American Rhododendron Society, Cascade Chapter

  •  7 p.m. second Tuesday of the month
  •  Bellevue Presbyterian Church, 1717 Bellevue Way N.E.
  •  333-6178
  •  www.arscascade.org

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Students find joy and meaning in volunteering

February 21, 2014

For Taylor Woo, a particular memory stands out from her time working at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.

Woo, a Liberty High School junior, serves as a volunteer patient care liaison at the hospital, one of the largest in the Northwest. One day, she was asked to speak with an 8-year-old boy who’d been in a car accident with his parents and younger sister.

The boy was responsive, but his sister lay in coma in an adjacent bed.

Above, left, Taylor Woo, a junior at Liberty High School, helps a visitor at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. Top right, Issaquah High School senior Robin Lustig volunteers with organizations like Friends of Youth, the Issaquah Community Network and the Drug Free Community Coalition. Above, right, Skyline High School senior Jonathan Yee helps fellow students through the school’s Key Club and Link Crew, and also works with Treehouse, an organization that supports foster children.

Taylor Woo, a junior at Liberty High School, helps a visitor at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.

“You can hear the heart monitor just beeping to her heart, and it was so hard to see,” Woo said. “It was sad how he couldn’t really comprehend what was happening with his parents.

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True grit

February 21, 2014

Modern mountain men prove their mettle shooting 1800’s-style muzzleloaders

Steve Baima struggled with his muzzleloader. An old-timer watched as Baima tried to get his handmade rifle to fire. Instead of the advice Baima expected, the old-timer told him a line he’s never forgotten.

“He said, ‘I hate to tell you this, but your scalp is already on the pole,’” Baima said.

Above, Rich Downs, of Kirkland, fires at a target during a monthly meeting of the Cascade Mountain Men at the Issaquah Sportsmen’s Club shooting range. Below, Darrell Kapaun, of Duvall, puts black powder, a cotton patch and a lead bullet on the muzzle of his replica full-stock Hawken 1840’s flintlock rifle and prepares to tamp it down to the touch hole.

Above, Rich Downs, of Kirkland, fires at a target during a monthly meeting of the Cascade Mountain Men at the Issaquah Sportsmen’s Club shooting range. Below, Darrell Kapaun, of Duvall, puts black powder, a cotton patch and a lead bullet on the muzzle of his replica full-stock Hawken 1840’s flintlock rifle and prepares to tamp it down to the touch hole.

That drove home to Baima that his new hobby — he had just started to learn how to make and shoot black-powder guns — once was a life-or-death necessity. Originally, he said, muzzleloaders were needed for self-protection and to put food on the table.

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Community Cornerstone

February 21, 2014

May 30, 1911, was a special occasion for Issaquah resident Mabel Ek.

So special, in fact, that the moment called for a new outfit. Ek arrived at Issaquah’s Baptist Church, near what is now the Darigold plant, wearing a new dress, knitted gloves and shoes specially ordered from Oregon.

City residents, of which there were only 500 at the time, arrived in droves to honor Ek and her classmates Mary and Olive Gibson.

Issaquah History Museums FIC.2000.049   The 1921 Issaquah High School women’s basketball team are (from left) May Wilkinson, Alix Sween, Erma Brown, Pearl Peck, Marie Chevalier, Alene O’Connor, Julia Erickson and Mildred Thompson.

Issaquah History Museums FIC.2000.049
The 1921 Issaquah High School women’s basketball team are (from left) May Wilkinson, Alix Sween, Erma Brown, Pearl Peck, Marie Chevalier, Alene O’Connor, Julia Erickson and Mildred Thompson.

After all, the three were about to make history, representing the very first graduating class of Issaquah High School.

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Picture this

February 21, 2014

Issaquah sets its sights on adding the French town of Savigny-le-Temple to its family of sister cities.

The city of Issaquah is expecting.

Like most new parents, city officials have a special glow in anticipation of the new arrival. Members of the City Council and Sister Cities Commission are anxiously waiting for a written proposal from the town of Savigny-le-Temple in France to establish a Sister City relationship.

Contributed Minister Mohamed Saad El Alami, mayor of Chefchaouen (center), and former Issaquah Mayor Ava Frisinger (right) walk through the Moroccan city’s streets with other delegation members and a security detail in 2007.

Contributed
Minister Mohamed Saad El Alami, mayor of Chefchaouen (center), and former Issaquah Mayor Ava Frisinger (right) walk through the Moroccan city’s streets with other delegation members and a security detail in 2007.

The transatlantic courtship began last fall, when a delegation of students from the French town came to Issaquah during Salmon Days and were so impressed they requested their city reach out to establish an official relationship. Leaders from the community 20 miles southeast of Paris have made plans to send another contingent of young people to the Northwest this summer.

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The green necklace: a gift to the city and the environment

February 21, 2014

More and more, people within the city are talking about the planned “green necklace.” It isn’t a gift of jewelry to citizens, but many see it as a gift to residents nonetheless.

The green necklace refers to a circle of parks and open spaces around the city, allowing easy pedestrian and bicycle access. It includes Lake Sammamish and the Issaquah Alps in the goal to surround the city and provide interconnected pathways between open spaces.

By Peter Clark Anne McGill, Issaquah Parks & Recreation Department director, visits the future Phase 3 site of Confluence Park, in an area she hopes the city will name ‘Margaret’s Meadow’ in honor of late park planner Margaret Macleod.

By Peter Clark
Anne McGill, Issaquah Parks & Recreation Department director, visits the future Phase 3 site of Confluence Park, in an area she hopes the city will name ‘Margaret’s Meadow’ in honor of late park planner Margaret Macleod.

Though the idea has existed for decades, the Issaquah City Council expressly outlined a plan to create the network of open space in the Central Issaquah Plan, approved in December 2012.

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Issaquah reimagined

February 21, 2014

How will the central district look in 30 years?

Since before the City Council passed the Central Issaquah Plan in late 2012, citizens have been wondering what the city will look like in 30 years.

“You’re standing in a great pedestrian area,” Issaquah Long Range Planner Trish Heinonen said, describing the average block according to the plan. “It will be very busy with walking people and people having lunch. And wherever you are standing, you can probably see a way to get to the green necklace.”

By Greg Farrar A 2002 aerial view shows Issaquah’s central district then. Now, city leaders are envisioning in the Central Issaquah Plan what the area would look like in 30 years.

By Greg Farrar
A 2002 aerial view shows Issaquah’s central district then. Now, city leaders are envisioning in the Central Issaquah Plan what the area would look like in 30 years.

As a vision for how to cultivate a dense, urban space within the central area and redevelop the flat lots into sustainable, walkable parcels, the Central Issaquah Plan has remained vague beyond the expressed desire to create a vivid environment with a “green necklace” of parks and open spaces around the city and an interlaced connection of walkways and bike paths to reach them.

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Pride of a city

February 21, 2014

Artist’s memory lives on in his many murals

Oregon-based muralist Larry Kangas was a one-man show with a paintbrush.

He had the innate ability to tell the story of a community with paint, ladders, a large blank wall and an unrivaled imagination.

 By Greg Farrar Larry Kangas puts some finishing touches on ‘The Mill Street Logging Scene,’ a mural of turn-of-the-century Issaquah, painted in 1997 on the wall of the Sunset Alehouse at the Downtown Issaquah Plaza.

By Greg Farrar
Larry Kangas puts some finishing touches on ‘The Mill Street Logging Scene,’ a mural of turn-of-the-century Issaquah, painted in 1997 on the wall of the Sunset Alehouse at the Downtown Issaquah Plaza.

Kangas died of cancer Nov. 25, 2013, but his memory lives on in the more than 1,000 murals he crafted across the Pacific Northwest, a few of which grace Issaquah walls.

“Larry never had any children. He was a great uncle for many kids, but he called his murals his kids, his legacy,” said Sandy Kangas, Larry’s wife.

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Hospital builds a reputation in Issaquah

February 21, 2014

Reputation. The success of any institution or business relies heavily upon its ability to solidify its reputation within the community. Sell the best widget or provide the best service and the reputation will follow. Somewhere within the halls of the Swedish/Issaquah is a wall that is filling fast with the awards and accolades earned from its growing reputation as one of the best patient care facilities in the nation.

When the facility officially opened after the completion of Phase 1 on Nov. 1, 2011, it didn’t take long before its emergency room received a 2012 Summit Award for patient satisfaction.

Then, in December 2013, Swedish/Issaquah was named one of The Leapfrog Group’s Top Hospitals in the nation, providing the highest quality of patient care in a survey of more than 1,300 hospitals.

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Issaquah voted Best ’burb

February 21, 2014

When Sunset magazine went looking for the perfect place to launch a career, start a family or provide the most relaxing setting, it hit upon Issaquah as its top choice.

In the magazine’s recently penned 24 Best Places to Live and Work 2014 article, Issaquah won Best ’burb. The writers found the city defied suburban life stereotypes thanks to 1,700 acres of parkland, walkable neighborhoods, historic buildings and such urban amenities as indie coffee shops, wine bars and a Tony Award-winning theater in Village Theatre.

Even with a population of 32,633, Sunset magazine said locals told them Issaquah feels like a small town — or a vibrant city neighborhood.

 The writers were impressed the former coal-mining town 22 miles southeast of Seattle managed to hold onto its distinctive character while growing exponentially. Rather than succumbing to typical suburban sprawl, town leaders decided to go urban, green-lighting the construction of compact, sustainably built communities on the east side of town.

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