Residents support bond for parks, pool

July 31, 2012

Conservation to protect wildlife habitat and creekside land is a priority for Issaquah residents, more so than other parks and recreation projects.

The information comes from a survey commissioned by city leaders as the initial step in a process to pass a multimillion-dollar bond measure to fund future parks projects. Data from the survey also addressed a bold proposal to create a special taxing district in the Issaquah School District to fund upgrades to the aging Julius Boehm Pool.

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Press Editorial

May 8, 2012

Park bond should include new museum

The Issaquah City Council is considering asking voters to approve another park bond, either this fall or in 2013.

Voters last passed a park bond six years ago.

The city will soon launch a public opinion survey to gauge residents’ interest in what the bond might include. The survey should reach residents by late spring or early summer.

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Construction to start on downtown Issaquah parks

April 17, 2012

Timeline remains uncertain due to lack of funding

The downtown parks along Issaquah Creek — 15.5 acres referred to as the crown jewel in the municipal parks system — can soon start a long transformation into undulating paths, picnic areas and more.

In a March 19 decision, City Council members approved the overarching design outline, or master site plan, for the interconnected Tollë Anderson, Cybil-Madeline and Issaquah Creek parks. The action laid the groundwork for construction to start on the site by late summer, though the effort to complete the parks could stretch for years.

City parks planners still need to acquire municipal permits for the initial construction phase. Meanwhile, architects at The Berger Partnership, a Seattle firm, continue to fine-tune the design for the parks.

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Issaquah voters could decide parks funds in November

April 17, 2012

Issaquah voters could decide as early as November on a multimillion dollar package to fund expansions and upgrades to city parks.

The proposed park bond could generate dollars to add amenities to existing parks, create additional parkland and purchase undeveloped land for conservation. The package could infuse funds into the parks system as lean municipal budgets limit the number of projects the city can undertake.

The municipal Parks & Recreation Department is in the initial stage to prepare for such a bond package, although the timeline is not yet firm. The decision to put a bond measure on the ballot is left to the City Council.

The city is considering offers from firms to conduct a public opinion survey to gauge residents’ interest in parks amenities. The survey should reach residents by late spring or early summer.

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Architect offers bold plan for creekside parks

November 30, 2010

The proposed design for a downtown parks site includes a horseshoe-shaped bridge across Issaquah Creek and meandering trails. The Berger Partnership

Initial proposal emphasizes ecology and history at downtown site

Ideas abound for the downtown parks along Issaquah Creek: boulders for climbing, meandering paths, community gardens, historic farmhouses repurposed as meeting spaces and — the centerpiece — a horseshoe-shaped pedestrian bridge across the creek at the main stem and the East Fork.

The ambitious plan aims to transform the oft-overlooked, 15.5-acre site near Darigold into a destination. Seattle landscape architect Guy Michaelsen said the intent is to create a park site “unique to Issaquah and a reflection of Issaquah.”

The site — often referred to as the “crown jewel” in the municipal parks system — encompasses Tollë Anderson, Cybil-Madeline and Issaquah Creek parks. The effort is the largest parks project since the city built Squak Valley Park South in 2008 and the most ambitious plan since the city laid the groundwork for Tibbetts Valley Park more than 20 years ago.

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Parks & Recreation Department hosts final parks open house

November 16, 2010

The city offers residents a last chance to help shape the future of downtown Issaquah parks Nov. 18.

The meeting to plan the future of Tollë Anderson, Cybil-Madeline and Issaquah Creek parks is scheduled for 7 p.m. Nov. 18 at Pickering Barn, 1730 10th Ave. N.W. Read more

City requests residents’ parks input at Pickering Barn

November 9, 2010

Issaquah has more than 15 downtown acres ready to be transformed into the “crown jewel” of the municipal parks system — and city leaders need residents to help shape the space.

Bring ideas for the latest additions to the city parks system — Tollë Anderson, Cybil-Madeline and Issaquah Creek parks — to Pickering Barn next week.

The city Parks & Recreation Department has scheduled a public meeting for 7 p.m. Nov. 18 at the barn, 1730 10th Ave. N.W. Residents can also complete a questionnaire about the parks at the city website.

The city plans to spend up to $1.6 million to complete the plan and build the initial phase of the 15.5-acre parks complex. Issaquah voters approved money to develop the parks in a 2006 bond.

Conservation rules and requirements attached to land donations limit how the creekside parks can be developed. Issaquah leaders often refer to site as a “crown jewel.”

In late May, parks officials picked Seattle landscape architecture firm The Berger Partnership to craft the overarching design, or master site plan, for the parks complex.

City hosts Issaquah Creek parks open house

October 19, 2010

Help decide the future of downtown Issaquah parks at a Tibbetts Creek Manor open house Oct. 21.

The meeting to plan the future of Tollë Anderson, Cybil-Madeline and Issaquah Creek parks is scheduled for 7 p.m. Oct. 21 at the manor, 750 17th Ave. N.W. Residents can also complete a questionnaire about the parks at the city website.

The meeting includes representatives from the city Parks & Recreation Department and The Berger Partnership, the Seattle landscape architecture firm spearheading the design.

The city plans to spend up to $1.6 million to complete the plan and build the initial phase of the 15.5-acre parks complex. Issaquah voters approved money to develop the parks in a 2006 bond.

City Parks & Recreation Department employees kicked off the planning process during a public picnic at the site in late August.

Bring ideas to parks planning session Oct. 21

October 12, 2010

Bring ideas for the latest additions to the city parks system to Tibbetts Creek Manor.

A meeting to plan the future of Tollë Anderson, Cybil-Madeline and Issaquah Creek parks is scheduled for 7 p.m. Oct. 21 at the manor, 750 17th Ave. N.W. Residents can also complete a questionnaire about the parks at the city website.

The city plans to spend up to $1.6 million to complete the plan and build the initial phase of the 15.5-acre parks complex. Issaquah voters approved money to develop the parks in a 2006 bond.

Conservation rules and requirements attached to land donations limit how the creekside parks can be developed.

City Parks & Recreation Department employees kicked off the planning process during a public picnic at the site in late August.

In late May, parks officials picked Seattle landscape architecture firm The Berger Partnership to craft the overarching design, or master site plan, for the parks complex. The firm also designed Cal Anderson Park and Warren G. Magnuson Park in Seattle.

City parks picnic to go ahead in rain or shine

August 26, 2010

NEW — 10 a.m. Aug. 26, 2010

Bring ideas for the latest additions to the city parks system to a picnic — in rain or shine.

The city-hosted picnic at Tollë Anderson Park, 595 Rainier Blvd. N., starts at 5 p.m. Thursday. The city Parks & Recreation Department has tents ready to shelter picnickers from inclement weather.

The parks department planned the picnic for the 15.5-acre site in order for people to understand the terrain at Tollë Anderson, Cybil-Madeline and Issaquah Creek parks.

The city plans to spend up to $1.6 million to complete the plan and build the initial phase. Issaquah voters approved money to develop the parks in a 2006 bond. Conservation rules and requirements attached to land donations limit how the creekside parks can be developed.

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