Nation to pause for moment of silence on 9/11 anniversary

September 11, 2011

NEW — 8:40 a.m. Sept. 11, 2011

Americans from coast to coast plan to observe a moment of silence at 10 a.m. as part of the 9/11 anniversary commemoration.

The agency responsible for the World Trade Center site — the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey — asked for all Americans to stop regular activity for one minute at 1 p.m. Eastern time, 10 a.m. Pacific time.

The pause is meant “to reflect on the lives lost and those affected by the tragedies of 9/11,” Port Authority officials said in a statement issued Sunday.

In Issaquah, the city, Eastside Fire & Rescue and community organizations plan to host a ceremony to commemorate the anniversary at 1 p.m. Sunday. The remembrance is scheduled to occur on the lawn at the Issaquah Community Center, 301 Rainier Blvd. S.

Issaquah Mayor Ava Frisinger is scheduled to speak at the event. The keynote speaker is Bill Lokey, a firefighter sent to New York City after 9/11 as part a special emergency services task force.

City lowers flags at municipal buildings on 9/11 anniversary

September 11, 2011

NEW — 6 a.m. Sept. 11, 2011

Issaquah leaders lowered flags at City Hall and other municipal buildings Saturday to commemorate 10 years since the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

Officials said the flags should remain at half-staff until Monday.

The city, Eastside Fire & Rescue and community organizations plan to host a ceremony to commemorate the anniversary at 1 p.m. Sunday. The remembrance is scheduled to occur on the lawn at the Issaquah Community Center, 301 Rainier Blvd. S.

Issaquah Mayor Ava Frisinger is scheduled to speak at the event. The keynote speaker is Bill Lokey, a firefighter sent to New York City after 9/11 as part a special emergency services task force.

Local leaders, citizens prepare for 9/11 commemoration

September 10, 2011

NEW — 8 a.m. Sept. 10, 2011

Issaquah residents prepared to mark 10 years since the 9/11 attacks Saturday, as local leaders utilized the anniversary to remind citizens to prepare for disasters and remain vigilant against threats.

The city, Eastside Fire & Rescue and community organizations plan to host a ceremony to commemorate the anniversary at 1 p.m. Sunday. The remembrance is scheduled to occur on the lawn at the Issaquah Community Center, 301 Rainier Blvd. S.

Issaquah Mayor Ava Frisinger is scheduled to speak at the event. The keynote speaker is Bill Lokey, a firefighter sent to New York City after 9/11 as part a special emergency services task force.

The anniversary also offered a chance for local leaders to cast a spotlight on emergency preparedness efforts.

Read more

Issaquah resident fled 9/11 destruction in Manhattan

September 6, 2011

Dana Macario, now a wife, mother and Issaquah resident, resettled in Washington after escaping Lower Manhattan on Sept. 11, 2001. By Greg Farrar

The unbridgeable gulf separating days before 9/11 from days after runs along a Manhattan street named — as if by chance — Liberty.

The street slices across Lower Manhattan and presses close to the World Trade Center site.

Issaquah resident Dana Macario, 33, endured the initial confused, chaotic moments after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks along Liberty Street.

Read more

Terrorist attacks inspired fallen soldier to enlist

September 6, 2011

Staff Sgt. Robert J. Wilson, a daredevil teenager from the Sunshine State, matured into a determined soldier in sun-scorched Iraq.

Robert J. Wilson

The boy in Florida sometimes jumped into a swimming pool from perilous heights or needed stitches to repair damage from a mistimed stunt.

The terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, led Wilson to abandon a rambunctious youth and focus on a military career.

The infantryman in Iraq often served on point, as the lead soldier in a formation, during foot patrols. Other soldiers in his unit had spouses and children at home. Wilson, unmarried and childless, chose the most-exposed position to shield other soldiers from harm.

“Even though he was my younger brother, he was usually more mature than me — for the most part,” said Darlene Weigle, Wilson’s older sister and a Mirrormont resident. “Sometimes, he was still my annoying little brother.”

The attacks on 9/11 led to a decadelong odyssey in Afghanistan and Iraq. The wars have claimed more than 6,000 U.S. service members — a grim milestone in a decade defined by catastrophe and conflict.

Read more

Issaquah ceremony offers chance to reflect on 9/11

September 6, 2011

“To me, it was one of the worst days in our nation’s history,” Eastside Fire & Rescue Deputy Chief Bud Backer said of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

But the way the country came together in the aftermath of those attacks can be pointed to as a source of pride, Backer added.

To mark the 10th anniversary of 9/11, the city of Issaquah, EFR, city police and other civic groups are joining in a public ceremony 1 p.m. Sept. 11 at the Issaquah Community Center.

Read more

Sept. 11 attacks spur interfaith group to help Habitat for Humanity

September 6, 2011

“What I’ve learned is that we all believe in one almighty God, that we are all to serve humanity and that’s how we serve God,” said Jawad Khaki, president of IMAN, a Northwest group for Muslims.

Khaki spoke during last year’s Together We Build project in Issaquah for the benefit of Habitat for Humanity of East King County.

Consisting of Muslims, Christians and Jews, Together We Build will hold its 10th annual construction project Sept. 8-10 and the following weekend of Sept. 15-17 at Habitat’s Issaquah Highlands development on Magnolia Street.

The days were specifically planned to bookend the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. Together We Build grew in the aftermath of those attacks. Over the past 10 years, the organization has contributed more than $430,000 to Habitat for Humanity.

Learn more at www.togetherwebuild.org.

Press Editorial

September 6, 2011

9/11 did not shake America’s spirit

The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 left a mixed legacy in America. Even 10 years later what exactly that legacy is remains unclear. It is still obscured by the dust and debris kicked up from the collapsing World Trade Center towers. There is no neat thread to tie it all together.

Part of the legacy is pain, shock, fear, suffering, introspection, resolve and hope.

But one thing is clear: Our communities remain strong. Terrorists cannot destroy the bonds that tie neighbor to neighbor.

Read more

« Previous Page