To the Editor — April 8, 2015

April 7, 2015

City arborist

Letting go of Alan Haywood was a mistake

Regarding the release of Alan Haywood: a very shortsighted action by the Issaquah City Council. We have just taken over Lake Sammamish State Park with its thousands of trees and remove the person who is best able to monitor the park trees!

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To the Editor — week of March 11, 2015

March 10, 2015

Community center

City is keeping people from use with high prices

I have lived on the Sammamish Plateau since 1978 in unincorporated King County. I pay taxes to the Issaquah School District. I shop and dine daily in Issaquah and by doing so, pay sales taxes to Issaquah.

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To the Editor — week of March 4, 2015

March 3, 2015

Traffic

Not having any money is the real issue

Ken Sessler has once again profounded about traffic and the Southeast Bypass. Ken, tell us something we don’t know about traffic in Issaquah.

The dearth of good north/south routes on the Eastside is historic in nature and if only we had a time machine to travel back in time to solve that problem back then, whenever “then” was.

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Off The Press — The trees will speak of Alan Haywood

January 27, 2015

Have you ever tried to listen to the trees?

Sometimes while swinging in my backyard hammock under the maple I try to hear the poetry of the leaves shining in the breeze. Sometimes on a Tiger Mountain hike, in a grove of firs towering above the ferns on the forest floor, I meditate on the hymns they sing. Coming across a gnarled old giant like the Ruth Kees tree at Lake Tradition, I imagine being able to hear lessons from its centuries of wisdom.

Yet my affection for them pales in comparison to the love Alan Haywood has shown the trees and plants of Issaquah for the last 30 years as the city’s professional arborist. He will no longer be employed by the city after the end of March, and I’m going to miss him as a friend and as a walking, talking botany encyclopedia.

Alan is the only person I have ever met who seems to know off the top of his head the Latin name of every single plant and tree in his care! Not only that, he knows each one’s favorite soil, growing season, optimum requirements for sunlight, shade and irrigation, and best pruning practice. Read more

Fresh foliage

January 20, 2015

TreePlantingParks-20150113B

By Greg Farrar Luis Estrada, one of the team of Issaquah Parks Maintenance workers on the site, pours sandy soil around the rootball of a columnar tulip tree, one of the 21 liriodendron tulipifera ‘fastigiatum’ trees that were planted Jan. 13 aside the baseball diamond at Veterans’ Memorial Field downtown. The previous windbreak of 30 old, unhealthy and potentially dangerous poplars were cut down in November. The new species was selected by city arborist Alan Haywood to be better-growing, have a wider-diameter crown, age better, and be more resilient against weather extremes, disease and insects. The city, because it is a Tree City USA, was eligible for a grant of $5,000 for the new trees from the Washington State Department of Natural Resources.

 

Enjoy street eats along Issaquah’s edible landscape

August 21, 2012

A pedestrian walks under ripening fruit on plum trees in front of KeyBank. By Greg Farrar

Don’t go to the store to buy supplies to bake pies or can fruits — go to Northwest Gilman Boulevard.

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Tree cleanup is latest headache for storm-weary residents

January 24, 2012

Fallen tree branches, scattered across the landscape like so many broken Lincoln Logs, continue to bedevil road crews and residents days after a major snowstorm and crippling ice storm rolled across Western Washington.

The task to clean up downed trees posed a challenge as the region faced a long power outage and difficult road conditions.

“From a tree damage standpoint, this has been very high,” city Arborist Alan Haywood said Jan. 23. “It’s not as catastrophic as the big windstorms we’ve had, because we did not have many real large trees come down and come down on houses and do that kind of damage.”

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Tree cleanup is latest headache for storm-weary residents

January 23, 2012

NEW — 8:15 p.m. Jan. 23, 2012

Fallen tree branches, scattered across the landscape like so many broken Lincoln Logs, continue to bedevil road crews and residents days after a major snowstorm and crippling ice storm rolled across Western Washington.

The task to clean up downed trees posed a challenge as the region faced a long power outage and difficult road conditions.

“From a tree damage standpoint, this has been very high,” city Arborist Alan Haywood said Jan. 23. “It’s not as catastrophic as the big windstorms we’ve had, because we did not have many real large trees come down and come down on houses and do that kind of damage.”

Downed trees on roadways prompted closures on city, county and state roads in Issaquah and nearby areas. Some homeowners reported damage from falling branches.

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City arborist offers advice to protect trees for winter

November 29, 2011

Issaquah city arborist and horticulturalist Alan Haywood said trees can suffer significant damage in winds of about 40 mph.

And Haywood said winds of that strength are not all that unusual in Issaquah. So, what do you do about the potential problem?

“Well, you can’t do anything to stop the wind,” Haywood said.

But there are steps you can take to protect both your trees and your home and other property from damage. Kevin Zobrist is a forestry educator for WSU and was one of the instructors for a recent outreach course on protecting trees. He said unhealthy or potentially hazardous trees will exhibit several warning signs, including yellowing or thinning foliage. Zobrist said the most common tree problem locally is root rot, a type of fungal infection.

According to Zobrist, the Douglas firs common in the Northwest are particularly susceptible to root rot. Some signs include a rounded, as opposed to a pointed, treetop.

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Fall chemistry turns leaves from green to gold

October 18, 2011

The mercury dips, rain starts to fall more often and leaves metamorphose from a demure green to riotous colors.

Why? The change of color each autumn involves a complex chemical process as trees prepare for the coming winter.

Throughout the growing season, chlorophyll is produced constantly. Then, as autumn starts and nights turn longer, chlorophyll production slows and then stops. The process allows the other colors in a leaf’s palette —brilliant golds, oranges and reds — to appear.

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