Issaquah officials want Klahanie Park decision to hinge on growth

February 26, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. Feb. 26, 2010

City officials called Thursday for decisions about adding Klahanie Park to the municipal parks system to be made alongside long-term growth agreements.

Members of the Council Services & Safety Committee discussed the park Thursday night. The committee followed a recommendation from the city administration to weigh decisions about the park in conjunction with potential Klahanie annexations in mind.

Although Klahanie and nearby neighborhoods border Issaquah and Sammamish, the area is included only in long-term growth plans for Issaquah. Officials from both cities will discuss the issue and others at a March 9 joint meeting.

City officials also encouraged King County to forge a maintenance agreement with a volunteer group or government agencies to keep the park open.

The full council will discuss the issue at 7:30 p.m. Monday. Members meet in the Council Chambers at City Hall South, 135 E. Sunset Way.

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Take a closer look at Issaquah’s public art

February 23, 2010

Public art is a big part of Issaquah today. In fact, there’s an entire city policy dedicated to it.

While it may be an addition to the city’s beauty — depending on your tastes — you may have driven by more than one of the pieces and wondered, “What is that?”  Well, here are some answers to some pieces you may have wondered about.

Have others that we didn’t list? Send them to editor@isspress.com.

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Issaquah considers Klahanie Park options

February 23, 2010

After listening to repeated pleas from Klahanie residents, City Council members will meet Feb. 25 to discuss a possible city takeover of county-run Klahanie Park. Read more

City seeks architect for park

January 19, 2010

The vision for Cybil-Madeline, Tollë Anderson and Issaquah Creek parks started to take shape in early January as city officials sent out a request for landscape architects to tackle the project. Read more

Officials seek architect, vision for Issaquah Creek parks

January 15, 2010

NEW — 12:15 p.m. Jan. 15, 2010

The vision for Cybil-Madeline, Tollë Anderson and Issaquah Creek parks started to take shape in early January as city officials sent out a request for landscape architects to tackle the project.

City officials spent years talking up the wooded, 15.5-acre area where Issaquah Creek meets the East Fork as the “crown jewel” of the municipal parks system. Issaquah voters approved $6.25 million for parks improvements and open space acquisition in November 2006, with money funneled to the confluence area parks. The parks maintenance facility is located near the site, and the city included the facility in the request to architects.

City Parks & Recreation Director Anne McGill and her team seek a landscape architect to turn the vision into reality. The architect will navigate a thicket filled with development and environmental limits on the land, and match the plan with residents’ wish lists, during the planning process.

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Press Editorial

January 5, 2010

Correction: The following editorial was published Jan. 6 in The Issaquah Press. Parks & Recreation Director Anne McGill explains that the city is putting out a Request for Qualifications to seek to hire an architectural designer for the new park. Two or three design firms will be chosen to develop conceptual site plans based on specific criteria, and a final firm will be selected by city parks staff to begin gathering community comments.

Let the community help design new park

When the city of Issaquah asked voters to approve a parks bond in 2006, one of the most enticing items to be funded was land that would expand city-owned property for the future Cybil-Madeline Park along Issaquah Creek. Read more

Park bond stretched to preserve open space, upgrade parks

November 17, 2009

Crews work to install artificial turf and lights at a Central Park sports field. Courtesy of Issaquah Parks & recreation Department

Crews work to install artificial turf and lights at a Central Park sports field. Courtesy of Issaquah Parks & Recreation Department

City parks officials used grants to stretch a $6.25 million park bond into almost $9.6 million — money then used to buy land for new parks, preserve open space and improve sports fields.

Issaquah voters approved the bond in November 2006 with a resounding margin: 76 percent. The dollars were split among open space acquisitions and improvements to existing parks. The park bond came almost 20 years after city officials last asked Issaquah voters for money to add recreation and open space.

Proponents pitched the bond to voters as a way to protect water quality in Issaquah waterways, add and enhance sports fields and open new areas to recreation and wildlife. Officials earmarked the biggest piece of the bond — $3.5 million — to buy creekside and hillside land. Read more

Planners envision downtown park as ‘crown jewel’

November 17, 2009

Almost 16 acres in downtown Issaquah will be transformed into walking paths and picnic areas, near where Issaquah Creek and the East Fork meet. The area encompasses three contiguous parks: Cybil-Madeline Park, Tollë Anderson Park and Issaquah Creek Park. City officials dubbed the area near the confluence of the creeks as the “crown jewel” of the municipal park system. Read more

Park Board considers pet rules

October 13, 2009

Park Board members said city pet ordinances should be revised with stronger language about citations and enforcement. Read more

Officials mull Timberlake Park dog suggestions after meeting

September 15, 2009

Robert Hook, a seven-year Montreux neighborhood resident, who takes his Newfoundland dog, Zeus, to Timberlake Park about once a month, raises his concern about the opinions of the audience being heard by the city at the Sept. 9 Timberlake Park pet rules open house meeting. By Greg Farrar

Robert Hook, a seven-year Montreux neighborhood resident, who takes his Newfoundland dog, Zeus, to Timberlake Park about once a month, raises his concern about the opinions of the audience being heard by the city at the Sept. 9 Timberlake Park pet rules open house meeting. By Greg Farrar

City officials are weighing options for future pet rules at Timberlake Park, where the city banned dogs in July.

First, parks staffers will glean suggestions from a stack of index cards filled out by residents last week. Officials hosted ban proponents and opponents at a Sept. 9 meeting; input from the meeting will be used as city officials consider changes to the ban or measures like citizen patrols to monitor the park.

About 70 people turned out for the Tibbetts Manor meeting. Officials organized the event after parks staffers and Mayor Ava Frisinger received a torrent of comments about the ban after it was implemented.

Officials banned dogs at the park after a series of reports of dogs knocking down children, grabbing food from picnic tables and running from park property into the lawns of adjacent homes. Read more

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