King County honors 11 Issaquah district ‘green’ schools

June 28, 2011

Thanks to the “green” conservation work of staff members and students, the King County Green Schools Program is honoring 11 schools in the Issaquah School District.

In total, King County will honor 77 schools across the country, including the 11 schools in Issaquah.

The three-level Green Schools Program provides hands-on assistance, recycling containers and signs, and website tools to schools. In addition to the Green Schools Program, King County provides an elementary school assembly program, classroom workshops and support for student green teams.

The program has saved schools and the district money from successful waste reduction and recycling programs, and reducing energy and water use.

Seven schools in the district have achieved Level One status, including Apollo, Cougar Ridge, Issaquah Valley, Sunny Hills and Sunset elementary schools; Pacific Cascade Middle School; and Issaquah High School. Level One schools focus on waste reduction and recycling.

Two schools in the district achieved Level Two, including Creekside and Newcastle elementary schools, after students and teachers targeted energy conservation.

The other two schools — Issaquah Middle School and Liberty High School — completed Level Three after students and teachers worked on water conservation.

“Thanks to support from King County Green Schools and city of Issaquah, the students and staff at these 11 schools understand why conservation is important and are doing a great job conserving natural resources and dollars,” John Macartney, the district’s resource conservation manager, said in a news release.

King County honors 11 ‘green’ Issaquah district schools

June 16, 2011

NEW — 3 p.m. June 16, 2011

Thanks to the “green” conservation work of staff and students, King County Green Schools Program is honoring 11 schools in the Issaquah School District.

In total, the county will honor 77 schools across the country, including the 11 schools in Issaquah.

The three-level Green Schools Program provides hands-on assistance, recycling containers and signs and website tools to schools. In addition to the Green Schools Program, King County provides an elementary school assembly program, classroom workshops and support for student “green” teams.

The program has saved schools and the district money from successful waste reduction and recycling programs and reducing energy and water use.

Read more

Issaquah School District considers $228 million bond

May 24, 2011

Though far from complete, the 2012 Issaquah School District bond has something for all of the district’s 24 schools, making the work-in-process price $228.6 million.

The proposal also includes remodeled or expanded schools for Apollo, Clark, Issaquah Valley and Sunny Hills elementary schools, Issaquah Middle School, and Liberty and Tiger Mountain Community high schools.

The bond proposal suggests the district tear down Tiger Mountain and Clark, and move the students to a remodeled building where Issaquah Middle School is now. The two schools would be close, but not connected, Associate Superintendent Ron Thiele said, with the Tiger move costing about $3.9 million and the Clark move costing about $19.5 million.

In the meantime, the district would build a new, two-story Issaquah Middle School where Clark and Tiger are now; that would cost about $62.5 million.

“This is the biggest project on the bond,” Thiele said.

The proposed bond also shows several trends — switches from carpet to rubber flooring, three new artificial-turf fields and two rain shields for outdoor play areas.

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Adventures await at school district’s summer camp

May 3, 2011

From archeological digs to building a garden, rope courses to hiking, adventure awaits Issaquah campers this summer.

Club Connection, for kindergarten through fifth grades, is held at four locations, including Apollo, Discovery, Endeavour and Sunset elementary schools. !MPACT, for grades six through eight, is held at Beaver Lake and Pacific Cascade middle schools.

Issaquah School District Day Camps are from June 20 to Aug. 19. The camps cost $40 per day, with a three-day minimum per week. All camps provide multiple field trips, on-site learning activities, simple and extensive crafts, cooperative games, physical challenges, team-building exercises and access to enrichment specialists from various fields.

Registration ends May 6. Download a form at http://connect.issaquah.wednet.edu. Go to “District,” at the top menu and click on “Before and After School Enrichment.”

Youth donates supplies to Humane Society

April 26, 2011

For Sydney Dalry, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals commercials were too much to handle. The sad faces of the cats and dogs made the Apollo Elementary School fourth-grader want to make a difference.

“I saw the animals, and I wanted to help them,” she said. “Some animals just don’t quite make it.”

She wanted to volunteer at the Seattle Humane Society, but was told she was too young. Her next idea was to collect donations instead of gifts for her 10th birthday in February. Her mother, Andrea Dalry, suggested she do a community outreach project instead, because it would allow her to reach beyond her friends.

Sydney collected cat and dog food, toys, towels, brushes and leashes during the first three weeks in February, using a Facebook page to spread the word.

In all, Andrea Dalry estimated Sydney collected about $500 worth of pet supplies. Sydney also held a work party with her friends to create catnip toys out of baby booties.

Read more

Officials to host meeting about sex offender

April 5, 2011

King County Sheriff’s Office and Issaquah School District officials reached out to parents March 23, because a registered sex offender is moving to May Valley.

Randall Berry

The sheriff’s office is holding a sexual-offender notification meeting April 20 at Apollo Elementary School.

The offender, Randall Eugene Berry, is moving to the 18800 block of Southeast May Valley Road. People living near Berry’s residence received mailers about the move.

Berry was charged with first-degree rape in 1984. Posing as an off-duty police officer with a fake badge, he used his vehicle’s headlights or emergency flashers to stop women who were driving alone, according to the sheriff’s office. He then told victims they had committed a traffic violation, or that they had defective vehicle equipment.

Berry then used a knife to force women from their vehicles and sexually assaulted them. The sheriff’s office said he had a total of four victims.

The sexual-offender notification meeting is in accordance with the Community Protection Act of 1990. People attending the meeting will learn about personal safety and how to best report criminal or suspicious activity.

What to know

Sexual-offender notification

  • 6:30-8 p.m.
  • April 20
  • Apollo Elementary School, 15025 S.E. 117th St., Renton

Call Detective J. Cline at 206-205-7988 with questions about the meeting. Learn more about Berry at www.sheriffalerts.com. Click on your state, and then your county and then search for offenders in your area.

Top volunteers honored at Golden Acorn Awards

April 5, 2011

For every strong school, there are strong volunteers who organize cultural fairs, chaperone field trips, coordinate family fun nights, photocopy assignments and hold bank days for student deposits.

The Issaquah PTSA Council awarded 73 volunteers from 23 schools with Golden Acorn Awards at the 2011 Recognizing Our All-Stars reception March 29.

Boy Scout Troop Pack 636 started the function with a flag salute, and Issaquah PTSA Council President Janine Kotan welcomed the crowd.

The ceremony had a sports theme, with presenters dressed in their favorite sports garb and giving speeches about how volunteers had wowed their fans and hit home runs for their schools.

Jennifer Good, a parent volunteer at Challenger Elementary School, said she began volunteering to meet people and promote education. She organized an ice cream social at the beginning of the year, while Ruth Steck, another parent volunteer, regularly snaps photos of students for the Challenger yearbook.

Both women said they appreciated the Golden Acorn Awards, though, “You don’t do it to be recognized,” Good said.

Read more

Salmon in the Classroom reaches crossroads

March 29, 2011

Clark Elementary School students (from left) Callie Mejia, 10, Hannah Halstead, 10, Jackson Rubin, 10, and Caelan Varner, 11, take turns feeding the coho salmon fry growing in the science room aquarium. By Greg Farrar

Questions remain about start-up costs, permits

For a Clark Elementary School class, raising coho salmon from eggs no larger than a BB pellet to miniscule fish is part lesson, part ritual.

Students traipse down the hallway from class to the aquarium in a science room in the morning, again at lunchtime and before the last bell rings in the afternoon. Using a small spatula, students scoop salmon food — a coarse substance similar to dirt in color and texture — into the aquarium.

Read more

Officials to host meeting about May Valley sex offender

March 23, 2011

NEW — 4 p.m. March 23, 2011

Randall Eugene Berry

King County Sheriff’s Office and Issaquah School District officials reached out to parents Wednesday, because a registered sex offender is moving to May Valley.

The sheriff’s office is holding a sexual-offender notification meeting from 6:30-8 p.m. April 20 at Apollo Elementary School, 15025 S.E. 117th St., Renton.

The offender, Randall Eugene Berry, is moving to the 18800 block of Southeast May Valley Road. People living near Berry’s residence received mailers about the move.

Berry was charged with first-degree rape in 1984. Posing as an off-duty police officer with a fake badge, he used his vehicle’s headlights or emergency flashers to stop women who were driving alone, according to the sheriff’s office. He then told victims they had committed a traffic violation, or that they had defective vehicle equipment.

Read more

Issaquah schools face end of Salmon in the Classroom

January 4, 2011

State program is a casualty of deep budget cuts

The salmon — or, more specifically, delicate salmon eggs no larger than a pencil eraser — return to a Clark Elementary School classroom each year.

But fourth- and fifth-grade teacher Liza Rickey could face a change in the curriculum soon as the state Salmon in the Classroom program ends.

In the program, students raise salmon, learn about water quality and salmon habitat, and discover the relationship between Issaquah Creek and Puget Sound.

State legislators eliminated dollars for the program in a round of budget cuts during a Dec. 11 special session. The program is a casualty of cuts as state leaders face a $4 billion budget hole. Read more

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