Poplars will be replaced with dogwoods, ginkgos

May 4, 2010

The company behind the ARCO station redevelopment will pay to plant ginkgo and dogwood trees near Front Street North and Northeast Gilman Boulevard after city workers remove aging poplar trees.

The city approved the poplar removal early last week, and then workers started removing the almost four-decade-old trees. The updated landscaping will include evergreen and deciduous shrubs and groundcover, as well as a perennial bed.

The poplars — planted in 1972 — usually live for about 35 years, but as the trees age and become less healthy, they can pose safety issues. Ginkgos can live for more than 100 years, dogwoods for more than 50 years.

The dogwood species planted will be Eddie’s White Wonder — Issaquah’s centennial tree.

Crews removed poplars from the northwest corner of the intersection in October 2008, and from the southwest corner last July.

Workers installed a new sign and pumps at the ARCO station, and work continues on a convenience store inside the shell of the former station. Crews will also refurbish the canopy above the gas pumps.

Poplars will be replaced with dogwoods, ginkgos

May 2, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. May 2, 2010

The company behind the ARCO station redevelopment will pay to plant ginkgo and dogwood trees near Front Street North and Northeast Gilman Boulevard after the city removes aging poplar trees.

The city approved the poplar removal Tuesday, and Wednesday, workers started removing the almost four-decade-old trees. The updated landscaping will include evergreen and deciduous shrubs and groundcover, as well as a perennial bed.

Read more

Top 10 news stories of 2009

December 29, 2009

flood weather GF 0108a

Sisters Jennifer Davies, Julianne Long and Mindy Heintz (from left) retrieve belongings Jan. 8 from the toppled guesthouse at the home of their parents, Jack and Karen Brooks, beside Issaquah Creek in the 23300 block of Southeast May Valley Road. — By Greg Farrar

Growth slowed and the economy cooled throughout 2009. The watershed moments in Issaquah hinged on expansion and recession. Leaders broke ground for a major new employer, even while other businesses left town for good.

Issaquah began the first decade of a new century as a fast-growing city, a title the city held for years. As 2009 reached a close, however, officials pared the size of government to face the new economic reality.

From January floods to record July heat and brutal December cold, 2009 was jam-packed, but the year was never dull.

Read more

Work stalls on Front Street properties

August 18, 2009

The ARCO gas station at the corner of Gilman Boulevard and Front Street remains undeveloped. By Adam Eschbach

The ARCO gas station at the corner of Gilman Boulevard and Front Street remains undeveloped. By Adam Eschbach

City officials issued a building permit for a 10,500-square-foot commercial building at a prime Front Street North location in early February. Since then, however, the site at 670 Front St. N. has gone undeveloped — a result of the cool economy and a tough retail market.

City officials have raised questions about the site — where Skippers restaurant once stood — and a nearby ARCO station in the midst of a delayed renovation project. Council President Maureen McCarry and Councilman Fred Butler raised questions about the ARCO site during a July 8 meeting with City Administrator Leon Kos. Read more