‘Easter Parade’ ends Issaquah Train Depot film series

April 10, 2012

The popular Films @ the Train Depot! departs the station soon.

The last film in the spring series plays at 7 p.m. April 14 at the historic Issaquah Train Depot, 50 Rainier Blvd. N. The program is free, due to support from the city Arts Commission and the King County cultural agency, 4Culture.

“Easter Parade” concludes the series. Judy Garland and Fred Astaire sing and dance across the screen. In the romantic musical classic from 1948, a dancer (Astaire) and a chorus girl (Garland) join forces in order to show up his former dance partner, Nadine (Ann Miller).

Monthly open-mic night invites performers to Issaquah Brewhouse

April 10, 2012

Join the city Arts Commission for Poetry & Prose on Tap, a monthly open-mic series.

The program is open to all ages and abilities. Organizers encourage participants to share poetry, stories and more.

The next Poetry & Prose on Tap is April 17. Participants can start signing in for the free event at 6:30 p.m. at the Issaquah Brewhouse, 35 W. Sunset Way. The open-mic portion starts at 7 p.m.

The brewhouse is open to patrons younger than 21, and organizers hope to attract a crowd diverse in age.

Issaquah Arts Commission’s open mic night celebrates written word

February 28, 2012

Nancy Talley, a Providence Point resident, reads one of her poems at the Issaquah Brewhouse. By Greg Farrar

A flier for the evening promised “poetry, prose and other ponderings.”

Open mic nights of the Issaquah Arts Commission are the third Tuesday of each month at the Issaquah Brewhouse on Sunset Way.

The evenings are now dubbed “Poetry and Prose on Tap.”

“We had a lot of fun and a lot of people,” Joan Probala, commission chairwoman, said of the open mic events that were formerly held at Vino Bella.

She noted the open mic events are for writers of every stripe and skill level.

For this night, the second event at the Brewhouse, there were about a dozen people and some competition for attention. The same night as the open mic event, the Brewhouse hosted a meet and greet with a Rogue Ale brewmaster. Still, those involved with the open mic night didn’t seem overly bothered by the loud atmosphere or the AC/DC music pouring out of the bar’s speakers.

“I’m happy to see people stroll in,” Probala said.

While she is not a writer herself, she appreciates the craft and likes the open forum.

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Arts Commission, Issaquah Brewhouse host all-ages open-mic event

February 14, 2012

Join the municipal Arts Commission for Poetry & Prose on Tap, a monthly open-mic series.

The program is open to all ages and abilities. Organizers encourage participants to share poetry, stories and more.

Sign-in for the free event starts at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 21 at the Issaquah Brewhouse, 35 W. Sunset Way. The open-mic portion runs from 7-8 p.m.

Commissioners used to hold open-mic nights at Vino Bella, but officials discontinued the series. The brewhouse is open to patrons younger than 21, and organizers hope to attract a crowd more diverse in age.

Poetry & Prose on Tap debuted in January.

City seeks applicants for municipal boards, commissions

February 7, 2012

City leaders need civic-minded citizens to offer advice on key issues as municipal board and commission members, even as officials remain undecided about just how many such groups Issaquah needs.

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Issaquah Train Depot film series returns

February 7, 2012

The popular Films @ the Train Depot! series includes Hollywood classics and mega-stars from a bygone era.

Films play at 7 p.m. at the historic Issaquah Train Depot, 50 Rainier Blvd. N. The program is free, due to support from the city Arts Commission and the King County cultural agency 4Culture.

“My Favorite Brunette” launches the series Feb. 11. The 1947 film stars Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour.

The classic “His Girl Friday” is scheduled for March 10. “Easter Parade” is due to conclude the series April 14.

Since the film program launched in October 2009, it has featured series of Bing Crosby films, train-themed films, films set in Washington and noir classics.

City seeks applicants for municipal boards, commissions

January 30, 2012

NEW — 6 a.m. Jan. 30, 2012

City leaders need civic-minded citizens to offer advice on key issues as municipal board and commission members, even as officials remain undecided about just how many such groups Issaquah needs.

The city needs applicants for openings on 12 boards and commissions. The groups advise the City Council on issues related to the arts, cable TV, development, parks and, in more specialized realms, city cemetery operations and sister-city relationships.

Officials need regular and alternate members. Applicants for board and commission posts do not need to reside in Issaquah.

Applicants undergo interviews before Mayor Ava Frisinger recommends appointees to council members for confirmation. The council usually confirms appointees in the spring. Terms for appointees start in May.

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Arts Commission serves Poetry & Prose on Tap at brewhouse

December 20, 2011

The menu at the Issaquah Brewhouse is going to include something different on tap in January.

The municipal Arts Commission is poised to unveil Poetry & Prose on Tap, a regular open-mic series for local poets and writers.

Read more

‘We’re No Angels’ concludes depot film series

November 22, 2011

The popular Films @ the Train Depot! departs the station soon.

The last film in the autumn series plays at 7 p.m. Dec. 10 at the historic Issaquah Train Depot, 50 Rainier Blvd. N. The program is free, due to support from the city Arts Commission and the King County cultural agency, 4Culture.

“We’re No Angels” concludes the series. In the 1955 film, Humphrey Bogart, Aldo Ray and Peter Ustinov play escaped inmates scheming to steal from a shopkeeper on Christmas. But the cons’ plans change after they start to like the shopkeeper and his family.

Since the film program launched in October 2009, it has featured a series of Bing Crosby films, train-themed films, films set in Washington and noir classics.

Fire Station 72 public art reflects environmental theme

October 11, 2011

Throughout the year, as Eastside Fire & Rescue Station 72 rose from a barren patch on the Issaquah Transit Center site, artist Perri Lynch headed east from Seattle to observe the construction.

The longtime artist sought ideas for a public art piece commissioned for the station. The result is a series of flexible ribbons affixed to the façade of the completed building. Lights behind the ribbons illuminate the ribbons and radiate after sunset.

Perri Lynch bolts the red and yellow ribbons of her artwork together in August for the public art installation at Eastside Fire & Rescue Station 72. By Greg Farrar

“The overall concept behind the work is this relationship between order and chaos, and how emergency and crisis interrupt the rhythm of our lives,” she said. “I wanted the artwork to reflect the stability but also the nimbleness that we all need.”

The artwork — and the $47,000 price tag — raised eyebrows among City Council members in June, although the council later approved funds for the piece.

Under city code, one-half of 1 percent of the initial $5 million in a project budget — plus one-quarter of 1 percent of the amount exceeding $5 million — is required to be used for public art.

The city initially set aside $32,000 for Station 72 public art. In addition, the municipal Arts Commission recommended another $10,000 in public art funding for the project.

The additional $5,000 in costs resulted because the artist changed the piece to incorporate more “green” materials. The resin used in the piece is 40 percent preconsumer recycled plastic.

“It was a great opportunity to design artwork in keeping with the larger values of the project,” Lynch said. “I love the ecological underpinnings of the station. That influenced the materials that I used.”

The untitled piece uses energy from the solar array on the rooftop to power the LED strips.

“So often, public art is brought in at the end of a major project. Often, you can tell — to the detriment of the architecture and the art,” Lynch said. “In this case, I had the opportunity to design as the station was taking shape, and that makes a huge difference.”

Warren Kagarise: 392-6434, ext. 234, or wkagarise@isspress.com. Comment at www.issaquahpress.com.

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