Take time to view Comet Lovejoy

January 14, 2015

NEW — 6:30 p.m. Jan. 14, 2015

Skywatchers should enjoy a good view of the Comet Lovejoy, or C/2014 Q2, which should be visible to the unaided eye under good conditions for the next few nights.

“Should we get a clear sky, Comet Lovejoy should appear to the right side of the constellations Orion and Taurus, now visible in the southern sky,” Bruce Palmquist, Central Washington University professor of physics and science education, said in a news release.

To see the comet, viewers should face due south, and look to the three stars that make up Orion’s belt.

NASA/MSFC/Jacobs Technology/ESSSA/Aaron Kingery

NASA/MSFC/Jacobs Technology/ESSSA/Aaron Kingery

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Superstar astronomer returns home

December 26, 2013

NEW — 6 a.m. Dec. 26, 2013

Issaquah grad IDs most distant galaxy ever detected

 

By Christina Corrales-Toy Steven Finkelstein (left), a 1999 Issaquah High School graduate, signs Issaquah freshman Colin Robitaille’s shoe Dec. 18 after a talk about his record-breaking discovery of the most distant and oldest galaxy ever detected.

By Christina Corrales-Toy
Steven Finkelstein (left), a 1999 Issaquah High School graduate, signs Issaquah freshman Colin Robitaille’s shoe Dec. 18 after a talk about his record-breaking discovery of the most distant and oldest galaxy ever detected.

Issaquah High School freshman Colin Robitaille took off his shoe and thrust it into the hands of guest speaker Steven Finkelstein.

“Here, sign it,” Robitaille said as he forked over a black Sharpie.

Finkelstein, a 1999 Issaquah graduate, doesn’t often get autograph requests, much less one on a shoe, but that’s not to say he shouldn’t have fans clamoring for his signature.

The University of Texas astronomy professor recently made history with his discovery of the most distant and oldest galaxy ever detected.

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