Sammamish downhill skier races in Whistler

March 2, 2010

Yina Moe-Lange looks toward 2014 Olympics

WHISTLER, British Columbia

Sammamish skier Yina Moe-Lange rests after completing the second race in the ladies’ giant slalom at the Whistler Creekside venue. By Andrea Collins

The cold rush of snow, blazing fast speeds and butterflies marked 16-year-old Yina Moe-Lange’s Olympic debut.

Moe-Lange, a Sammamish resident skiing for Denmark, put the pedal to the metal the second day of competition, shaving her time dramatically to place 47th out of 60 competitors in the second run of the ladies’ giant slalom Feb. 25.

“I was super nervous yesterday,” she said of the first race, held Feb. 24. “Everything was so different. There were more people there that wouldn’t normally be there at a race. The thought of knowing that was tough.

“I got the first start out of the way and skied today more like I’ve skied every other race in every other course.”

By the second day of competition, the butterflies floated away and what was left, for one of the youngest competitors in the games, was sheer athletic ability. Read more

A look at the legacy left behind by Issaquah’s first rockstar candy maker

February 23, 2010

In 1956, in a town more renowned as a farming community and for its legacy in the logging and mining industries, an unlikely new venture opened its doors in Issaquah by an even more uncommon man.

In the foothills of the Issaquah Alps, Julius Boehm found a perfect setting, one that reminded him of his home in the Austrian Alps, from which to offer up a risky venture few thought had much chance at success — selling handmade chocolate confections.

“People thought it was a joke of an idea at the time,” said Bernard Garbusjuk, the current owner of Boehm’s Candies.

Well, the joke was on the doubters, as Julius Boehm added a new legacy the city of Issaquah can now lay claim to.

But as time marches on further away from Boehm’s passing in 1981, fewer remain who knew the man willing to take that risk.

Read more

Iditarod docudrama excites race communications coordinator

September 23, 2008

Issaquah resident Bernadette Anne, communications coordinator for the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, shows the snow parka and hat she wears while in Alaska. Photo by David Hayes

Issaquah resident Bernadette Anne, communications coordinator for the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, shows the snow parka and hat she wears while in Alaska. Photo by David Hayes

Bernadette Anne has participated in all but two Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Races in Alaska since 2000 as a volunteer at some level before ascending to communications coordinator this year.

The Issaquah resident has worked several checkpoints along the more than 1,000-mile route and has flown the course by charter plane to follow the action.

But even Anne has not seen or experienced all that the mushers and their dogs survive to make it from Anchorage to Nome.

Until now.

Anne is highly anticipating a new docudrama produced by the makers of the Discovery Channel’s show, “Deadliest Catch.” Premiering at 10 p.m. Oct. 14 is “Toughest Race on Earth: Iditarod.”

“If you’ve seen ‘The Deadliest Catch,’ then you’ll understand how it’s filmed the same way,” Anne said. “During this six hour series, you can watch this year’s race as it happened.”

The Discovery Channel flew a crew of 20, including Read more