Art by Heart comes to Salmon Days

September 23, 2014

Art by Heart, a nonprofit organization founded by three ninth-graders at Skyline High School, interacts with children with different abilities while spreading awareness about such conditions to the community.

Art by Heart will bring awareness about Autism Spectrum Disorder by partnering with the Autism Society of Washington at the Salmon Days Festival Oct. 4-5.

Join these teens at Art By Heart booth No. 653 in the Field of Fun area from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. both days. In addition to learning and spreading awareness about autism, there will be face-painting, drawing, quizzes and a raffle.

Learn more here.

 

Understanding autism from an objective point of view

August 27, 2013

Bellevue College student Kevin May was given the opportunity to wear different hats during the annual of Autism Day WA celebration at the Jubilee Farm in Carnation last weekend. Literally.

Diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum as a teenager, the Issaquah resident understands the need to identify the outward signs of the disorder at a young age. Given the opportunity to interview and explore the aspects of autism as a reporter assigned to cover the annual Autism Day WA event, he was able to explore the controversy that surrounds the medical diagnosis.

Contributed Kevin May wears a vintage fedora with a ‘press’ card in the band as he enjoys walking from tent to tent at Jubilee Farm in Carnation during Autism Day WA.

Contributed
Kevin May wears a vintage fedora with a ‘press’ card in the band as he enjoys walking from tent to tent at Jubilee Farm in Carnation during Autism Day WA.

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Jubilee Farms hosts Autism Day WA

August 7, 2012

The 12th annual Autism Day WA is from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 11 at Jubilee Farms, 229 W. Snoqualmie River Road N.E., Carnation.

The free event for families touched by autism will give families and caretakers an opportunity to relax in the peaceful surroundings of an actual working farm. The day has been designed as an all-day family activity in a relaxed setting with an assortment of activities for children.

A list of volunteer opportunities is available at www.autismdaywa.org. Learn more about donations or participation by contacting Lynne Banki at lynne@autismdaywa.com or 802-7420.

Fundraiser benefits autism-afflicted toddler

July 30, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. July 30, 2010

Help a little boy battle autism at a fundraiser in Issaquah.

Small Threads for Kids, a consignment shop specializing in children’s clothing, hosts the fundraiser Friday and Saturday. Part of the sales benefit a boy in need of medical care for autism.

The store, 1480 N.W. Gilman Blvd., No. 3, is open 9:30 a.m. – 6 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Saturday.

Learn more about the fundraiser here. Find the store on Facebook.

Special Olympics nurtures an enthusiasm for sports

February 23, 2010

With her straight, brown hair tied in a ponytail, 11-year-old Abbey Powers threw her basketball into the air, bounced it against the backboard and grinned as it fell through the hoop.

Her teammates whooped and her father shouted words of encouragement before the ball even hit the ground.

While many children play basketball, Abbey is a special case. Doctors diagnosed her with both autism and cerebral palsy, although they never gave her family a clear diagnosis that would explain all of her challenges.

“It was unbelievable,” her father Jeff Powers said. “We were told she wouldn’t walk, we were told she wouldn’t talk, we were told she would only live to 2.”

Now a sixth-grader at Pine Lake Middle School, Abbey has a full schedule. Four years ago, her family enrolled her in Special Olympics for a children’s basketball class. At first, her parents only knew of practices in Woodinville, and would drive Abbey all the way from Issaquah so she could dribble the ball as part of a basketball team.

When they learned Issaquah offered a Special Olympics program in their own backyard, they were delighted, Jeff Powers said. But they’re not nearly as excited as Abbey.

“She got up extra early this morning,” her father said as he watched her and her friends play ball at the Issaquah Community Center. “She could hardly wait for basketball.”

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Local 4-H program survives county cuts

December 22, 2009

Malori Yates (left), of the Eastside Rabbits and Cavies 4-H Club, presents her rabbit at the 2009 Puyallup Fair to judge Sarah Cleavenger (right), a former member of the club, during Rabbit Fit and Show competition. By Mark Fredrickson

Malori Yates (left), of the Eastside Rabbits and Cavies 4-H Club, presents her rabbit at the 2009 Puyallup Fair to judge Sarah Cleavenger (right), a former member of the club, during Rabbit Fit and Show competition. By Mark Fredrickson

King County officials nixed a plan last week to put the local 4-H program out to pasture.

A last-minute, $109,000 infusion from the King County Council will keep the program afloat for another year. The youth organization with agricultural roots now includes offerings in things such as plant science, horse riding and robotics.

Local 4-H’ers will also have somewhere to showcase their handiwork: The council allocated $50,000 to continue the King County Fair — the oldest fair west of the Mississippi River.

Councilman Reagan Dunn, who represents unincorporated King County south of Issaquah, said the outcry from 4-H participants and parents prompted the council to adjust the budget.

“I’m glad that we were able to scrape together enough funding for another year, because 4-H is so important to the youth of my district,” Dunn said in a statement released after the Dec. 14 council decision. “I have heard from hundreds of parents and students who participate or have participated in the program. I have seen them in action at the King County Fair. It was very sad to think that the program might end.”

Officials decided to cut money for 4-H as they worked to fill a $56 million county budget gap. After officials announced the cut, however, 4-H supporters rallied to preserve money for the program. Read more

Preschool popularity grows as precursor to kindergarten

August 25, 2009

In kindergartens today, expectations are far beyond what they were 20 years ago, and the bar seems to be set higher at every grade level. Preschool, once thought of as something to give moms a break and a chance to meet other moms, has become an almost required preparation for kindergarten. Read more

Parent develops creative education for the autistic

August 18, 2009

Anne Scroggs and Mitchell Scroggs use the Creative Teaching CAP system she developed by learning how Mitchell's autism affected how he learned. Contributed

Anne Scroggs and Mitchell Scroggs use the Creative Teaching CAP system she developed by learning how Mitchell's autism affected how he learned. Contributed

When Anne Scroggs learned her son Mitchell Scroggs, 21, had autism in the early 1990s, there was little information and few opportunities for his education.

“When Mitchell was diagnosed, it was so bleak,” she said. “All the literature said people with autism should be institutionalized and that was unacceptable to me. My happy little boy wouldn’t be institutionalized. There was more for him. I knew it.”

Anne and Mitchell Scroggs’ perseverance not only led to Mitchell’s graduation from the Issaquah School District, but to the creation of a curriculum, called Creative Teaching CAP, that Scroggs said she hopes will help other special-needs children reach their graduations as well. Read more

Community garden nears completion

May 26, 2009

50 volunteers turn out to help

Volunteers on May 8 begin work on the community garden situated at AtWork!’s front yard. Photos By Greg Farrar

Volunteers on May 8 begin work on the community garden situated at AtWork!’s front yard.P Hotos By Greg Farrar

Sustainable Issaquah had the idea. AtWork! had the land. At an April 22 work party, all interested constituents came together to map out plans to develop a new community garden.

Sustainable Issaquah, a new community group that champions ecofriendly projects, had decided a community garden would be one of its projects.

AtWork!, a center that provides people with disabilities training to be productive, integrated and contributing members of the community, had the space, on land it leases from the city. AtWork! CEO Chris Brandt thought it would be a good use of the 3,000 square feet of landscape.

“We thought it would be better to use it than just mow it,” Brandt said.

Highlands resident Tariq Panni, who helped build a garden for his community, was asked to help.

“It all came together very quickly with less cost and twice the enthusiasm as the garden I did before,” Panni said. Read more

Join Pet Walk for Autism tomorrow

April 24, 2009

NEW — 6 a.m. April 24, 2009

The Pet Walk for Autism, a fundraising event for the national organization Today’s Hope, is from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. April 25 in the Snoqualmie Historic District.

Several people and their pets from Issaquah have already signed up.

Register and download your sponsorship form here.

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