EDITORIAL

July 29, 2014

Please don’t feed the bears, ever

 

“A fed bear is a dead bear.”

Those were true words from an expert who spoke to The Issaquah Press several years ago about the bears people were reporting in their yards and trashcans in the Issaquah area.

They are still true now. We have built our homes and businesses in their yards, and we are going to come into contact with wildlife.

We are the stewards of this land, and we have a responsibility to keep those animals (along with our neighbors) safe. That means letting animals be when we encounter them. Don’t hassle them. Don’t try to pet them. Don’t feed them.

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Not feeding bears will help animals survive

July 22, 2014

A 304-pound black bear near Issaquah-Hobart Road peers out of the large trap where he sits in a pile of straw behind bars. He pops his jaw, sways back and forth, and then explosively charges with wild fervor. He’s following his instincts for finding food.

The large bruin and at least five other bears have been repeatedly coming to a residence near Issaquah, where, for the past 13 years, the occupant has been feeding them 5-gallon buckets full of bird seed in her backyard, Washington State Department of Fish & Wildlife Officer Jason Capelli said.

By Tami Asars Recording measurements on a tranquilized black bear are (from left) Lindsay Welfelt, WSU master student/bear researcher, Brian Kertson, wildlife research scientist, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Jason Capelli, a Fish and Wildlife officer.

By Tami Asars
Recording measurements on a tranquilized black bear are (from left) Lindsay Welfelt, WSU master student/bear researcher, Brian Kertson, wildlife research scientist, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Jason Capelli, a Fish and Wildlife officer.

 

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Off the Press

December 4, 2012

Use common sense to keep all critters safe

Kathleen R. Merrill
Press managing editor

It’s been an interesting and somewhat sad year regarding local wildlife.

Interesting because of some of the new critters I’ve seen at home. Sad because of several deaths in the area.

My heart continues to ache for the 15-year-old golden retriever that was killed by a cougar in the Riverbend area of North Bend in September. What a horrible way for a beloved pet to die. That dog, left outside and attacked in the middle of the night, deserved more.

Also in September, a bear was shot and killed by a Snoqualmie man. The bear was in the man’s garbage, according to police. That bear, doing what bears do, forage for food, deserved more.

Last week here in Issaquah, a bear was hit and killed on Front Street South. I’ve said for a long time that people drive far too fast in some places, especially within our cities. It doesn’t seem to me that bears are so fast that one would dart out in front of a car, but maybe that’s what happened.

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Under new state laws, residents face fines for feeding bears

November 13, 2012

Under new state laws, residents face fines for feeding bears intentionally or otherwise, such as by leaving food waste in bear-prone locations.

The state Department of Fish and Wildlife reminded residents about the changes last month, as black bears start to appear more frequently in areas populated by humans.

“This is the time of year when bears are looking to build up as much fat as possible to get through winter,” Mike Cenci, deputy Department of Fish and Wildlife police chief, said in a statement. “Putting food scraps out for them or leaving garbage cans or pet food exposed is an open invitation for them to pay you and your neighbors a visit.”

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Under new state laws, residents face fines for feeding bears

October 22, 2012

NEW — 6 a.m. Oct. 22, 2012

Under new state laws, residents face fines for feeding bears intentionally or otherwise, such as by leaving food waste in bear-prone locations.

The state Department of Fish and Wildlife reminded residents about the changes Oct. 19, as black bears start to appear more frequently in areas populated by humans.

“This is the time of year when bears are looking to build up as much fat as possible to get through winter,” said Mike Cenci, deputy Department of Fish and Wildlife police chief, said in a statement. “Putting food scraps out for them or leaving garbage cans or pet food exposed is an open invitation for them to pay you and your neighbors a visit.”

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Encounter at Issaquah school offers bear safety reminder

October 16, 2012

Mike Pernack spotted a black bear cub in Squak Mountain’s Big Bear Court neighborhood Oct. 4. By Mike Pernack

Issaquah Valley Elementary School administrators briefly put the campus into lockdown Oct. 3 after surprise guests ambled onto school grounds.

State Department of Fish and Wildlife officers, plus Mishka, a Karelian bear dog, responded to the downtown Issaquah school, but arrived after a female bear and trio of cubs dashed across campus.

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Bear on campus puts Issaquah Valley Elementary into lockdown

October 10, 2012

Bears roam on the Issaquah Valley Elementary School campus Wednesday. By Jake Kuper, Issaquah School District

NEW — 4 p.m. Oct. 10, 2012

A bear and three cubs paid a surprise visit Wednesday to Issaquah Valley Elementary School, prompting administrators to put the building into lockdown.

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How to survive summer vacation

June 28, 2012

The summer months have arrived.

School is out, the anticipation of summer weather is almost too much to bear, and now you’re ready to head outdoors and enjoy it.

But wait! Before you head out the door, there are summer hazards to be aware of and ways to make sure you stay safe.

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CleanScapes to offer bear-resistant trash containers to Issaquah customers

June 26, 2012

The next garbage hauler for most Issaquah residents, CleanScapes, rolled out a compressed-natural gas truck and wildlife-resistant containers in recent days, as the company prepares to start service in the city.

The contract between Seattle-based CleanScapes and the city starts July 1, though service in the city does not commence until July 2 because the previous day is a Sunday.

The changeover from Waste Management to CleanScapes affects most Issaquah customers. Allied Waste — a local name for national company Republic Services — hauls garbage in South Cove and Greenwood Point neighborhoods along Lake Sammamish.

In a June 13 ceremony, CleanScapes executives and city leaders celebrated the addition of a hydraulic launch assist, compressed natural-gas powered truck to the company fleet. Officials said CleanScapes is the first company in the Pacific Northwest to use the truck.

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CleanScapes unveils natural gas garbage truck, wildlife-resistant containers for Issaquah

June 15, 2012

NEW — 8 a.m. June 15, 2012

The next garbage hauler for most Issaquah residents, CleanScapes, rolled out a compressed-natural gas truck and wildlife-resistant containers in recent days, as the company prepares to start service in the city.

The contract between Seattle-based CleanScapes and the city starts July 1, though service in the city does not commence until July 2 because July 1 is a Sunday.

The changeover from Waste Management to CleanScapes affects most Issaquah customers. Allied Waste — a local name for national company Republic Services — hauls garbage in South Cove and Greenwood Point neighborhoods along Lake Sammamish.

In a June 13 ceremony, CleanScapes executives and city leaders celebrated the addition of a hydraulic launch assist, compressed natural-gas powered truck to the company fleet. Officials said CleanScapes is the first company in the Pacific Northwest to use the truck.

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