Beaver Lake Triathlon / Aug. 18, 2012

August 21, 2012

Beaver Lake Triathlon takes off Aug. 18

August 14, 2012

The Beaver Lake Triathlon is set to kick off Saturday Aug. 18 bright and early at 7:45 a.m.

The triathlon will consist of a one-fourth mile swim in 68 to 77 degree water, a 13.8-mile bike route with 510-foot elevation gain and a 4.3-mile run through the hills that surround Beaver Lake.

Registration by Aug. 16 is $82 and bumps up to $87 on Aug. 17. Register at blt.beaverlake.org/registration.html. Registration is limited to 600 participants.

Nightmare at Beaver Lake organizers need a hand after trailer heist

July 3, 2012

Nightmare at Beaver Lake organizers asked the public for donations to replace a trailer stolen from its Kent headquarters June 19.

Scare Productions, a nonprofit theater group and partner in the annual Halloween-themed event at Beaver Lake Park, discovered the 18-foot Wells Cargo-brand cargo trailer had been stolen.

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Nightmare at Beaver Lake organizers need a hand after trailer heist

June 28, 2012

NEW — 12:30 p.m. June 28, 2012

Nightmare at Beaver Lake organizers asked the public for donations to replace a trailer stolen from its Kent headquarters June 19.

Scare Productions, a nonprofit theater group and partner in the the annual Halloween-themed event at Beaver Lake Park, discovered the 18-foot Wells Cargo-brand cargo trailer had been stolen.

Kelcey Hendricks, promotions director at Scare Productions, said the group believes the trailer went missing late in the evening of June 12 or early June 13.

The group reported the theft has been reported to Kent police, but police have no leads yet, he added.

The trailer contained several props used in the Halloween event, including an 8-foot by 4-foot vibrating floor, two 5-foot-tall Jacob’s ladders and other tools.

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Cool off on a river float, but remember safety tips

June 28, 2012

Rumor has it there’s a season in the year where the sun outmuscles the clouds and shines for more than once a week.

Were that rumor to come true, some rain-drenched, sun-starved Washingtonians will no doubt choose to spend their days tubing in one of the state’s rivers and lakes.

Don Martin, an experienced rescuer, river guide and owner of whitewater rafting company River Recreation, said rivers and lakes offer different advantages.

“The allure of rivers is that you’re traveling to a different section of river,” as you float, he said. A lake offers a calmer alternative, with not so much moving water. Washington state is full of lakes like that, he added.

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Winter weather does not keep seasoned triathletes from year-round training

February 21, 2012

A racer speeds around a corner on West Beaver Lake Drive Southeast, at the beginning of the 13.8-mile leg of the 2010 Beaver Lake Triathlon. By Christopher Huber

The triathlon has become one of the most popular spring and summer sports. It attracts people of all ages, athleticism and professional backgrounds.

Essentially, the race consists of swimming, bicycling and running. However, triathlons range in difficulty from the Olympic and sprint races to the rigorous Ironman events. The three popular local races — Issaquah Triathlon, Beaver Lake Triathlon and Lake Sammamish Triathlon — are classified as sprints.

Because the actual season does not start until late May, many people put off training for triathlons until the weather warms up.

But veteran triathletes like Mark Stendal, of Sammamish, begin preparing for triathlons in January.

Stendal has been involved in triathlons for 20 years. He has competed in at least 60 triathlons.

“I did five triathlons last year, two sprints and three Olympics,” Stendal said.

He is the founder of the Beaver Lake Triathlon, an event held in late August that has grown in popularity every year.

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State stocks hatchery-raised rainbow trout in Beaver Lake

November 15, 2011

The state Department of Fish and Wildlife released about 2,300 Issaquah Salmon Hatchery-raised rainbow trout into Beaver Lake last week.

State Fishery Biologist Aaron Bosworth said Beaver Lake is best fished by small boat, although anglers also can find some success in fishing from shore.

Beaver Lake is among a group of Western Washington lowland lakes open to fishing year round. The state prohibits internal-combustion boat engines on the lake. The state requires all anglers 15 and older to carry a valid fishing license to fish at Beaver Lake.

The daily bag limit is five fish — only two of the fish can exceed 15 inches in length — and bait anglers must keep the first five trout caught.

Beaver Lake is most easily reached from East Beaver Lake Drive Southeast, off of Southeast 24th Street. The site includes limited parking for vehicles and boat trailers.

Vehicles must display a valid Department of Fish and Wildlife Vehicle Access Pass or a Discover Pass.

State shuts down Beaver Lake access soon to stock rainbow trout

November 5, 2011

NEW — 6 a.m. Nov. 5, 2011

The state Department of Fish and Wildlife plans to release about 2,300 Issaquah Salmon Hatchery-raised rainbow trout into Beaver Lake soon.

The access site at the lake is due to close at sunset Nov. 7 to prepare for the Nov. 8 release. The lake reopens at sunrise Nov. 9, but the lake is open to fishing even as the access site is shut down.

State Fishery Biologist Aaron Bosworth said Beaver Lake is best fished by small boat, although anglers also can find some success in fishing from shore.

Beaver Lake is among a group of Western Washington lowland lakes open to fishing year round. The state prohibits internal combustion boat engines on the lake. The state requires all anglers 15 and older to carry a valid fishing license to fish at Beaver Lake.

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Nightmare at Beaver Lake relies on dedicated team to create serious scares

October 25, 2011

Marek Kossik, 14, an Eastside Catholic High School student, has zombie face paint applied by Nightmare on Beaver Lake volunteer Kelly Davis before the Oct. 21 haunt. By Greg Farrar

The blood run occurs in a deep forest moments before 8 o’clock on nights leading to Halloween.

Dawn Gonser, lead makeup artist for Nightmare at Beaver Lake, dispenses a crimson liquid to ghouls stationed along a path through Beaver Lake Park.

The distinction between blood types is important. The other type is a goo used to create fresh scabs. The stage blood Gonser races across Beaver Lake Park to squirt into actors’ mouths is a nontoxic liquid similar in taste to mint-flavored mouthwash.

The last-minute touch-up increases the creep factor as actors prepare to scare attendees in horror-film fashion.

Gonser, a longtime Nightmare at Beaver Lake organizer, is part of a close-knit team skilled at scaring.

“It gets into your blood and you keep coming back year after year,” she said.

Nightmare at Beaver Lake is the largest Halloween haunt in the Puget Sound region and, perhaps, in the West.

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Nightmare at Beaver Lake / October 2011

October 21, 2011

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