Police dispatcher agrees to hair-shedding fundraiser

July 6, 2010

Issaquah Police Chief Paul Ayers takes the first swipe at emergency dispatcher Jacqueline Kerness’ hair, which she volunteered to have shaved off to help raise money for the Susan G. Komen 3-Day for the Cure breast cancer walk in September. By Chantelle Lusebrink

The Eagle Room at City Hall buzzed in anticipation as police dispatcher Jacqueline Kerness nervously sat down in a chair at the center of the room.

Stepping behind her, poised with a set of buzzing electric clippers, Police Chief Paul Ayers made the first swipe through Kerness’ hair, sending the brown locks to the floor.

“Here we go,” he said, taking a swath of hair from the base of her head. “I think it’s looking good.”

Shedding her hair June 30 was all for a good cause, said Kerness, who bravely volunteered to have her colleagues cut away. She has been interested in helping battle cancer since high school, and she had her hair cut in February 2009 as a donation to Locks of Love, the organization that makes wigs for cancer patients.

This time, Kerness’ colleagues bid to take a turn with the clippers, each time raising money for fellow dispatcher Carma Mathieson to participate in September’s Susan G. Komen 3-Day for the Cure breast cancer walk.

“I have been bountifully blessed with health, so I walk,” Mathieson said. “It takes a huge commitment, because it is a lot of time away from my family, but they support me.

“I’ll do it every year, until cancer is done.”

Both of her parents, Francis Bingham, 70, and Helen Bingham, 73, died from cancer within the past 15 years, she said. Her aunt also died of cancer. She said she has had several friends and colleagues — during her 24 years as a city employee — who have been diagnosed with different cancers and have fought the disease. Read more

Dine at Coho Café to support cancer research

July 6, 2010

What could be better than hitting the outdoor patio at Coho Café? How about dining out to help find a cure?

Coho Café in Issaquah will host a fundraiser July 17 to raise money for the Susan G. Komen Foundation’s 3-Day for the Cure walk in September.

The restaurant has teamed up with a dining membership company, allowing members to donate their meal savings to The Rack Warriors, a local team of 10 women who are walking in Seattle’s 60-mile event this September.

So, where do you come in? All you need to do is eat lunch or dinner.

The restaurant will host the event through its partnership with Passport Unlimited, a popular dining membership. With the Passport Unlimited membership, guests dining with other people typically receive their second entrée on the house.

During the event, instead of getting the second meal for free, you can pay for it and donate the price to The Rack Warriors. If you do, there are a variety of coupons and door prizes restaurant employees will award in return.

The fundraiser also occurs at Coho Café in Redmond and both Arnies locations in Mukilteo and Edmonds.

City employee gets buzz cut for good cause — cancer research

July 1, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. July 1, 2010

Issaquah Police Chief Paul Ayers takes a clipper to Emergency Dispatcher Jacqueline Kerness' hair as part of a Wednesday fundraiser for cancer research. By Chantelle Lusebrink

The Eagle Room at City Hall buzzed in anticipation as Emergency Dispatcher Jacqueline Kerness nervously sat down in a chair at the center of the room.

Stepping behind her, poised with a set of buzzing electric clippers, Police Chief Paul Ayers made the first swipe through Kerness’ hair, sending the brown locks to the floor.

“Here we go,” he said, taking a swath of hair from the base of her head. “I think it’s looking good.”

Shedding her hair Wednesday was all for a good cause, though, Kerness said.

Her colleagues bid to take a turn with the clippers, each time raising money for fellow emergency dispatcher, Carma Mathieson, to participate in September’s Susan G. Komen 3-Day Breast Cancer Walk.

Read more

Dine at Coho Café to support a cure for breast cancer

June 29, 2010

NEW — 11 a.m. June 29, 2010

What could be better than hitting the outdoor patio at Coho Café? How about dining out to help find a cure?

Coho Café in Issaquah will host a fundraiser July 17 to raise money for the Susan G. Komen Foundation’s 3-Day for the Cure walk in September.

The restaurant has teamed up with a dining membership company, allowing members to donate their meal savings to The Rack Warriors, a local team of 10 women who are walking in Seattle’s 60-mile event this September.

So where do you come in? All you need to do is eat lunch or dinner.

Read more

Mammography coach comes to Sammamish on Wednesdays

May 4, 2010

The Evergreen Hospital Medical Center Mammography Coach will be open 8:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. each Wednesday until further notice at the Evergreen Primary Care Center Sammamish, 22850 N.E. Eighth St.

The 40-foot mobile digital mammography coach contains the same digital mammography equipment used in the Breast Center at Evergreen Hospital. Patients will register in the reception area and complete a clinical history form in a relaxing environment. After changing into a gown in a private room, a mammography tech performs the exam.

The mammography images are interpreted at the Breast Center by board-certified breast radiologists. Screening mammograms are also analyzed with computer detection tools. The radiologist’s report is then sent to the patient’s primary care provider.

When patients call 899-2831 to schedule their mammograms, they will be offered the option of an appointment in the mobile coach or at the Breast Center at Evergreen Hospital. You do not need to be a patient at an Evergreen Primary Care Center to access the mobile mammography coach.

Mammogram recommendations don’t sit well with doctors, women

January 19, 2010

When the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force made new recommendations for breast cancer screening in November, Susan Woerdehoff said she was shocked.

“I thought it was ridiculous,” said Woerdehoff, 43, who was diagnosed with stage 1 breast cancer at age 38. “I didn’t necessarily understand it. But it was concerning. It didn’t seem to benefit the greater good.”

What the Bellevue resident said she didn’t understand was the recommendation to move away from years of standard practice.

The federally appointed task force recommended that women at average risk should wait to get routine screening mammograms until they’re age 50, instead of the current standard of 40.

It also advised that women ages 50 – 74 get them every two years and discourages doctors from advising women to examine their own breasts regularly.

The guidelines seek to reduce overtreatment. Downsides to screening include false-positives, radiation exposure and psychological harm, according to the task force report. Read more

Issaquah manager training for Ride to Empower

September 22, 2009

Irma Dore and her son, Chris, are training for an experience of a lifetime — the Breast Cancer Network of Strength’s Ride to Empower, a destination bike ride Oct. 22 – 25 in Red Rock Canyon, Nev. Read more

Tips for promoting breast cancer awareness

September 15, 2009

Breast cancer is a prolific disease with an estimated 192,370 new cases diagnosed this year in women and 1,910 new cases diagnosed in men, according to the National Cancer Institute. Read more

Walker ready for the challenge of the Breast Cancer 3 Day

September 8, 2009

Thousands of individuals will walk in the Breast Cancer 3 Day event in Seattle from Sept. 11-13, enjoying time with friends and family, remembering loved ones who have died and fundraising for a cure. Read more

Fundraiser fights her own battle with breast cancer

May 19, 2009

Evelyn De la Cruz

Evelyn De la Cruz

Evelyn De la Cruz longs for the day when her daughter doesn’t have to worry about breast cancer.

The Issaquah woman has been a tireless advocate for early detection and fundraising for the local chapter of the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure organization.

She had planned to staff a booth at the Puget Sound Race for the Cure event June 7. Instead, she’ll be home recuperating from her second breast cancer surgery in less than two years. It’s a disease she’s all too familiar with. Read more

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