Former mayor honored with county green building award

April 1, 2014

Former Mayor Ava Frisinger may be out of office, but she’s not out of awards.

King County’s GreenTools Sustainable Cities Roundtable celebrated its fifth anniversary with an award event March 13 and the environmentally focused program gave Frisinger the Green Building Legacy Award.

“It’s for outstanding leadership in green building,” program manager for the King County GreenTools Program Patti Southard said of the award. “We do a retreat every fall where we discuss leadership and who we would like to honor.”

Contributed King County Executive Dow Constantine (left) hands the Green Building Legacy Award to David Fujimoto, Issaquah sustainability director, who accepted the honor for former Mayor Ava Frisinger.

Contributed
King County Executive Dow Constantine (left) hands the Green Building Legacy Award to David Fujimoto, Issaquah sustainability director, who accepted the honor for former Mayor Ava Frisinger.

Read more

City, King County leaders flip switch on zHome

September 20, 2011

Issaquah and King County leaders gathered Sept. 14 to flip the switch on zHome, the first zero-energy, carbon-neutral multifamily community in the United States.

Built to use zero net energy and 70 percent less water than a traditional home, Issaquah, King County and other partners collaborated to open the 10-townhouse complex in the Issaquah Highlands. The project is meant to serve as a model for incorporating “green” elements into mainstream homebuilding.

King County Executive Dow Constantine (right, at lectern) prepares to address the crowd at the opening of zHome in the Issaquah Highlands on Sept. 14. Contributed

County Executive Dow Constantine joined Mayor Ava Frisinger to open the facility at a ceremony in the zHome courtyard.

“This pioneering project sets a new standard for how homes can — and should — be built in our region and country,” Frisinger said in a statement. “Our vision is that zHome’s innovative approach will catalyze the market for much ‘greener’ building materials and technologies, as well as inspire the next generation of homebuilders through examples that are replicable and market rate.”

The project included aggressive benchmarks to set a different standard in “green” homebuilding. Units in zHome range from the low $400,000s to the $600,000s.

Read more

King County Parks unveils ‘green’ campsite design in Issaquah

September 14, 2011

NEW — 7 p.m. Sept. 14, 2011

Campers in a King County park might notice a sustainable place to spend the night soon.

The parks agency challenged entrants to design a “green” camping space to create a comfortable and durable sleeping area from a cargo container.

County officials announced the top design in the “Little Footprint, Big Forest” contest at the Built Green Conference in Issaquah on Wednesday.

The top design — selected from a panel including County Executive Dow Constantine and other judges — came from a Seattle firm, HyBrid Architecture.

The design features a flexible floor plan, queen-sized bunk beds, and a multipurpose cabinet fashioned from recycled and reclaimed materials.

Read more

City, King County leaders flip switch on zHome in Issaquah Highlands

September 14, 2011

King County Executive Dow Constantine (center, at lectern) prepares to address the crowd at the opening of zHome in the Issaquah Highlands on Wednesday. Contributed

NEW — 4:45 p.m. Sept. 14, 2011

Issaquah and King County leaders gathered Wednesday morning to flip the switch on zHome, the first zero-energy, carbon neutral multifamily community in the United States.

Built to use zero net energy and 70 percent less water than a traditional home, the city, county and other partners collaborated to open the 10-townhouse complex in the Issaquah Highlands. The project is meant to serve as a model for incorporating “green” elements into mainstream homebuilding.

County Executive Dow Constantine joined Mayor Ava Frisinger to open the facility in a ceremony in the zHome courtyard.

“This pioneering project sets a new standard for how homes can — and should — be built in our region and country,” Frisinger said in a statement. “Our vision is that zHome’s innovative approach will catalyze the market for much greener building materials and technologies, as well as inspire the next generation of homebuilders through examples that are replicable and market rate.”

The project included aggressive benchmarks to set a different standard in “green” homebuilding. The zHome team said the project used almost 80 percent Forest Stewardship Council-certified wood, low-toxicity materials and salmon-friendly practices at the site.

The photovoltaic panels on the rooftops capture sunlight in the summer and create energy for the units and the regional grid. In the winter, as the units pull power from the grid, the energy use evens out to zero.

The city spearheaded the project, alongside King County, Built Green — a nonprofit program focused on sustainable construction — highlands developer Port Blakely Communities, Puget Sound Energy and the Washington State University Energy Program. Ichijo USA, a subsidiary of a large Japanese homebuilder, and local builder Matt Howland built the units.

Read more

City plugs in energy-saving zHome, leader in ‘green’ living

September 13, 2011

Family spends night at zero-energy townhouse to test innovations

Some of the 10 carbon-neutral townhomes of the zHome community glow in the setting sun along Northeast High Street in the Issaquah Highlands. By Greg Farrar

The steeply angled roofs and street-side rain garden attract attention to the townhouses along Northeast High Street.

The effect is deliberate, because the 10-townhouse complex, called zHome, is designed to encourage people to explore and rethink notions about “green” living. The project is the first carbon-neutral and zero-energy multifamily community in the United States.

Read more

King County Parks needs a judge for camping contest

August 16, 2011

King County Parks needs a fan to help judge a quirky camping contest.

County parks managers selected a team of noteworthy names to choose the winning design in the “Little Footprint, Big Forest” competition — a contest to create a camping shelter from a 20-foot-long shipping container — but they need one more judge.

In order to enter the drawing to be a judge, people need to like King County Parks on Facebook, www.facebook.com/iheartkcparks, and leave a wall post naming their favorite camping cuisine by 4:30 p.m. Aug. 22.

The deadline to submit a design for the “Little Footprint, Big Forest” competition is also Aug. 22. The selected designer receives $4,500 and a chance to see his or her work become part of the county parks system.

Contest organizers encourage all architects, designers, hobbyists, students, builders and creative people to apply.

The challenge is to design a “green” camping space to create a comfortable and durable sleeping area from a cargo container.

The selected design is due to be announced Sept. 14 as part of the Built Green Conference and Festival, a gathering in Issaquah for building industry professionals.

Issaquah’s zHome partners share project insights

July 12, 2011

This month’s zHome interview is with Patti Southard, program manager for King County GreenTools, the county’s green building program.

What do you do for your organization?

I provide technical assistance to the county’s Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design and Built Green programming and work with nonprofit organizations, such as the Cascadia Green Building Council and Built Green to institutionalize green building and climate change strategies countywide. As a former business development director for Green Depot (formerly the Environmental Home Center) and Duluth Timber Co., I also have more than 10 years of experience developing markets for green products.

How do you define a green building material?

What makes a product green can vary depending on the material, but it typically has one or more of the following attributes:

  • Is manufactured using recycled material, and/or sustainably managed and renewable resources.
  • Is salvaged, refurbished or remanufactured material.
  • Is manufactured with locally available components, which saves energy and transportation resources.
  • Does not contribute to poor indoor air quality, meaning the material emits few or no carcinogens, toxins or irritants, and have minimal to no emissions of volatile organic compounds.
  • Does not pose health risks to employees during the manufacturing process.
  • Is manufactured to be durable/long-lasting, yet can be easily repurposed or recycled at the end of its useful life.
  • What is unique about zHome’s materials?
Read more

Innovative zHome community opens Sept. 14

May 31, 2011

The opening date is Sept. 14 for zHome, a groundbreaking cluster of carbon-neutral townhouses under construction in the Issaquah Highlands, the project manager announced May 3.

Construction is scheduled to conclude earlier, but the additional weeks should allow crews enough time to prepare the units for public open houses. The grand opening is scheduled on the same day as the Built Green Conference, a yearly gathering for building industry professionals interested in eco-conscious practices.

Plans call for tours to run from the conference at Pickering Barn to zHome in the highlands. Brad Liljequist, zHome project manager, announced the opening date.

The project is designed to produce as much electricity as residents consume — hence the zero-net energy name — and is meant to be a leader in energy and water conservation.

Construction crews also used a high percentage of salvaged, reclaimed and local materials to build zHome.

Construction on zHome started last April, after Howland Development Issaquah — a joint venture between Shoreline developer Howland Homes and Japanese homebuilder Ichijo Co. subsidiary Ichijo USA — teamed up to build and finance the project.

Issaquah’s innovative zHome community to open Sept. 14

May 3, 2011

NEW — 10:30 p.m. May 3, 2011

The opening date is Sept. 14 for zHome, a groundbreaking cluster of carbon-neutral townhouses under construction in the Issaquah Highlands, the project manager announced Tuesday morning.

Construction is scheduled to conclude earlier, but the additional weeks should allow crews enough time to prepare the units for public open houses. The grand opening is scheduled on the same day as the Built Green Conference, a yearly gathering for building industry professionals interested in eco-conscious practices.

Plans call for tours to run from the conference at Pickering Barn to zHome in the highlands. Brad Liljequist, zHome project manager, announced the grand opening date.

The project is designed to produce as much electricity as residents consume — hence the zero-net energy name — and is meant to be a leader in energy and water conservation.

Construction crews also used a high percentage of salvaged, reclaimed and local materials to build zHome.

Read more

Come behind the scene at zHome to meet the experts

April 19, 2011

What is zHome?

When it opens this September, zHome — just east of the Issaquah Highlands Park & Ride — will be the first multifamily, production, zero-energy, carbon-neutral community in the United States.

Brad Liljequist

ZHome is a template for what 21st century, carbon-neutral housing looks like. It will use:

Zero net energy by balancing out its carbon emissions during the course of the year.

70 percent less water than a typical home.

Materials that come from some of the greenest sources possible.

Who is behind this project?

The city is spearheading the project. ZHome, however, is also a collaborative effort of several organizations and companies, including Ichijo USA, Built Green, King County, Port Blakely Communities, Puget Sound Energy and the Washington State University Energy Program.

Read more

Next Page »