Cascade Water Alliance secures drinking water supply

October 5, 2010

The state Department of Ecology has OK’d a water-rights package for a future drinking water source for Issaquah residents.

The approval grants Cascade Water Alliance the authority to use a portion of the water in Lake Tapps for drinking water and, at the same time, guarantees water levels to maintain summer recreation at the popular Pierce County lake.

Department of Ecology Director Ted Sturdevant announced the agreement Sept. 16.

Formed in 1999 and headquartered in Bellevue, the alliance supplies water to more than 370,000 county residents and 22,000 businesses — or nearly 50 percent of retail water sales in King County outside of Seattle. The regional group includes the Sammamish Plateau Water and Sewer District, Issaquah, Bellevue and other Eastside and South King County cities and water districts.

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Cascade Water Alliance secures drinking water supply

September 17, 2010

NEW — 8 a.m. Sept. 17, 2010

The state Department of Ecology has OK’d a water-rights package for a future drinking water source for Issaquah residents.

The approval grants Cascade Water Alliance the authority to use a portion of the water in Lake Tapps for drinking water and, at the same time, guarantees water levels to maintain summer recreation at the popular Pierce County lake.

Department of Ecology Director Ted Sturdevant announced the agreement Thursday.

Formed in 1999 and headquartered in Bellevue, Cascade Water Alliance supplies water to more than 370,000 county residents and 22,000 businesses — or nearly 50 percent of retail water sales in King County outside of Seattle. The regional group includes the Sammamish Plateau Water and Sewer District, Issaquah, Bellevue and other Eastside and South King County cities and water districts.

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Quality of drinking water exceeds standards

June 22, 2010

Issaquah tap water exceeds water-quality standards set by state and federal regulators.

Officials announced the findings in the annual water-quality report issued June 16, and mailed the report to residents in early June.

The city purchased and produced 751.1 million gallons of drinking water last year. Issaquah customers used 693.4 million gallons of water during the same period.

City customers use water drawn from the Lower Issaquah Valley Aquifer. The city has four wells to the underground water source — a pair in the northeastern part of the city and another pair in the northwestern part. The wells vary from 100 feet to 400 feet deep.

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Quality of Issaquah drinking water exceeds standards

June 22, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. June 22, 2010

Issaquah tap water exceeds water-quality standards set by state and federal regulators.

Officials announced the findings in the annual water-quality report issued Wednesday, and mailed the report to residents in early June. Read the complete report here.

The city purchased and produced 751.1 million gallons of drinking water last year. Issaquah customers used 693.4 million gallons of water during the same period.

City customers use water drawn from the Lower Issaquah Valley Aquifer. The city has four wells to the underground water source — a pair in the northeastern part of the city and another pair in the northwestern part. The wells vary from 100 to 400 feet deep.

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Cascade Water Alliance receives eco honor

May 11, 2010

Environmentalists honored Cascade Water Alliance, Puget Sound Energy and local government agencies last week for efforts to preserve a rail corridor through the Eastside.

Cascade Land Conservancy honored the water alliance as a 2010 Cascade Agenda Leadership Award winner. The group shares the award with Redmond, King County, Sound Transit, the Port of Seattle, Puget Sound Energy, and Sound Transit.

Issaquah City Council President John Traeger serves as a member of the water alliance board of directors.

The award celebrates the role of community leaders in linking great communities, a healthy environment and a strong economy. Cascade Land Conservancy recognized the recipients for their effort to purchase the former BNSF Railway corridor for future public use. The line stretches from Snohomish to Renton.

“This was an easy decision for us,” Cascade Land Conservancy CEO Chuck Clarke said in a news release. “It just made sense for us to join with the other public agencies interested in future use of the corridor. Each of us had a good reason to invest our public funds in the corridor, and in the end, the public wins too by keeping the corridor intact.”

Cascade Land Conservancy — the largest land conservation and stewardship organization in the state — announced the award at a May 6 breakfast.

Besides Issaquah, the nonprofit water alliance includes Bellevue, Redmond, Kirkland, Tukwila, the Sammamish Plateau and Skyway water and sewer districts, and the Covington Water District.

City Council sets parks, transportation among 2011 goals

May 4, 2010

City Council members outlined goals for parks, technology, economic development and transportation to be accomplished next year. The council eschewed broad policy goals and recommended specific projects.

Members culled 62 suggestions into a handful of rough goals. Municipal staffers will then hone the list into a final stack of goals for the council to approve next month.

The council gathered in a Public Works Operations Building conference room May 1 for the daylong discussion to set goals for 2011.

Council President John Traeger encouraged members to offer multiple suggestions.

“There are no bad ideas, and no goal is too big or too small,” he said.

The retreat included initial discussion about the upcoming budget. City department chiefs use the goals set by the council to formulate budgets for the upcoming year.

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Stop toilet leaks

March 23, 2010

To keep a vital natural resource from going down the drain, conservation officials mailed leak-detection kits last week to every single-family residence in Issaquah. Read more

Watch the mailbox for a free leak-detection kit

March 16, 2010

NEW — 12:25 p.m. March 16, 2010

To keep a vital natural resource from going down the drain, conservation officials have mailed leak-detection kits to every single-family residence in Issaquah.

The city Resource Conservation Office and Cascade Water Alliance sent the kits — a dye strip to be used to determine whether toilets leak water. A leaky toilet can waste thousands of gallons of water each year.

“Every home has toilets and eventually they all leak,” Mike Brent, water resources manager for the water alliance, said during a City Council meeting Monday.

Brent joined city Resource Conservation Office Manager David Fujimoto and a water conservation mascot — a blue, anthropomorphic water droplet named Wayne Drop — at the meeting to discuss the importance of leak detection.

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State auditors give thumbs up to Cascade Water Alliance

March 2, 2010

Auditors determined the Cascade Water Alliance complied with state law and safeguarded public assets, a state audit released Feb. 16 shows. Read more

Ron Little to leave utility district

February 16, 2010

Ron Little

When Ron Little retires, 29 years of history goes with him.

Little has been an employee of the Sammamish Plateau Water and Sewer District since July 1981. He precedes the district’s current name, the formation of Sammamish as a city and the installation of the Bellevue-Issaquah water pipeline, the main source of the plateau’s water supply.

He wasn’t always headed for a life of water and sewer utilities. When Little first graduated from the University of Illinois with an engineering degree, he migrated to Los Angeles, hoping to work on race cars. Read more

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