Cash for Appliances rebate dollars run out

November 16, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. Nov. 16, 2010

The money for eco-friendly appliances has run out.

Cash for Appliances Washington reached the final stage Monday, as organizers said all rebate funds had been committed and await processing.

The popular state Department of Commerce program helped more than 40,000 Washington consumers transition from outdated appliances to Energy Star models.

Consumers can still apply for rebates, but any applications received now will be placed on a waiting list. In the event any applications under evaluation do not qualify, the waiting list will be processed in the order received. The process should continue for the next seven weeks until the money has been exhausted.

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Last call for Cash for Appliances rebate offer

November 2, 2010

Now is the time to upgrade to a more energy efficient refrigerator or washer — and let the government pick up part of the tab.

The state Department of Commerce has announced a last call for rebates on energy-efficient appliances through the Cash for Appliances effort. The program has helped more than 30,000 people upgrade to Energy Star appliances and more than $4 million in rebates.

The program ends after funds run out — and the money is fast disappearing.

Find complete program details — including eligibility requirements, qualifying appliances and the rebate application form — here. Cash for Appliances is open to all Washington residents.

The program offers cash rebates on Energy Star refrigerators, clothes washers, dishwashers, water heaters and ductless heat pumps. In most cases, consumers can receive additional incentives from gas and electric utility providers.

The federal Department of Energy funded the program and the state Department of Commerce acts as the administrator.

Dollars run out soon in Cash for Appliances rebate offer

November 1, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. Nov. 1, 2010

Now is the time to upgrade to a more energy efficient refrigerator or washer — and let the government pick up part of the tab.

The state Department of Commerce has announced a last call for rebates on energy-efficient appliances through the Cash for Appliances effort. The program has helped more than 30,000 people upgrade to Energy Star appliances and more than $4 million in rebates.

The program ends after funds run out — and the money is fast disappearing.

Find complete program details — including eligibility requirements, qualifying appliances and the rebate application form — here. Cash for Appliances is open to all Washington residents.

Read more

Trade in old appliances for more energy-efficient models

April 13, 2010

Many homeowners may not realize their appliances are a big energy drain — and a drain on their wallet. Cash for Appliances Washington, now available throughout the Evergreen State, offers consumers extra cash back to help them make the switch to a new energy-efficient refrigerator or clothes washer.

Refrigerators manufactured before 1993 cost about $80 to run on average each year, compared to current Energy Star-qualified models that cost as little as $30 annually. Clothes washers that are more than 10 years old add an extra $135 per year in utility costs compared to a new Energy Star-qualified model. In addition to obtaining extra cash back after purchase, participants will save money month after month on their utility bills.

Cash for Appliances Washington rebates are only available until funds run out. The program offers $100 cash back on new, qualified Energy Star clothes washers and $75 on new Energy Star refrigerators when the old unit is recycled. These cash-back incentives are in addition to the incentives offered through Washington utilities for purchasing new and recycling old appliances.

“Washington has an objective to improve statewide per capita energy efficiency by 10 percent by 2012, towards a goal of 20 percent by 2020,” Gov. Chris Gregoire said in a news release. “We stimulate the appliance marketplace by offering consumers a good reason to purchase a new appliance. We reduce water and energy consumption which helps preserve the environment of our state, and consumers reduce their long-term energy bills.” Read more