Council approves annual appointments to city boards and commissions

May 27, 2014

Last year’s mayoral candidate Joe Forkner will go back to work for the city, joining 43 others appointed to various Issaquah governing bodies.

The City Council unanimously approved Mayor Fred Butler’s recommendations to appoint or reappoint a host of residents to most of the city’s 17 boards and commissions during its regular meeting April 21.

The annual appointments fill the vacancies expiring April 30. Most regular members serve four-year terms, while alternate members serve two-year terms.

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City seeks applicants for municipal boards, commissions

February 7, 2012

City leaders need civic-minded citizens to offer advice on key issues as municipal board and commission members, even as officials remain undecided about just how many such groups Issaquah needs.

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City seeks applicants for municipal boards, commissions

January 30, 2012

NEW — 6 a.m. Jan. 30, 2012

City leaders need civic-minded citizens to offer advice on key issues as municipal board and commission members, even as officials remain undecided about just how many such groups Issaquah needs.

The city needs applicants for openings on 12 boards and commissions. The groups advise the City Council on issues related to the arts, cable TV, development, parks and, in more specialized realms, city cemetery operations and sister-city relationships.

Officials need regular and alternate members. Applicants for board and commission posts do not need to reside in Issaquah.

Applicants undergo interviews before Mayor Ava Frisinger recommends appointees to council members for confirmation. The council usually confirms appointees in the spring. Terms for appointees start in May.

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City Council confirms, lauds municipal board appointees

May 3, 2011

Onetime City Council finalist Paul Winterstein is going to continue serving the city on the Human Services Commission, the liaison between social service groups and municipal government.

The council appointed Winterstein and 35 other people as members and alternates to city boards and commissions April 18. Terms on the 11 affected boards start May 1. The city does not pay members.

“I am continually amazed at the number of people — and their qualifications — that stepped forward to fill our boards and commissions,” Councilman Fred Butler said before the unanimous decision to appoint the members. “It seems to me in going through the applications and the qualifications of folks, we’ve got an especially strong group of people filling some critical holes on our boards and commissions again this year.”

The city put out a call for board and commission applicants in January. Then, Mayor Ava Frisinger and board officers narrowed the applicant pool, and recommended appointees to the council for approval.

The city is continuing the interview process for alternates to serve on the Sister Cities and Urban Village Development commissions.

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City seeks civic-minded citizens for volunteer posts

January 11, 2011

City leaders seek civic-minded citizens to serve on municipal boards and shape environmental and land-use decisions, guide the future of municipal parks, and foster relationships between Issaquah and the international community.

The city has openings on 11 boards and commissions. Not all applicants must be Issaquah residents. Read more

City seeks civic-minded citizens for volunteer posts

January 6, 2011

NEW — 4 p.m. Jan. 6, 2011

City leaders seek civic-minded citizens to serve on municipal boards and shape environmental and land-use decisions, guide the future of municipal parks, and foster relationships between Issaquah and the international community.

The city has openings on 11 boards and commissions. Not all applicants must be Issaquah residents.

Candidates can pick up the application at the City Clerk’s Office at City Hall, 130 E. Sunset Way, during regular business hours.

Applicants must submit signed and completed applications and city forms by noon Jan. 31.

In the weeks ahead, city staffers contact applicants and schedule interviews for February.

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Council confirms board and commission appointments

May 11, 2010

Former City Council candidates Nathan Perea and Vincent Ippolito will serve the city in a different capacity in the years ahead: as volunteer members of a city commission.

City Council members confirmed 35 appointees to city boards and commissions May 3. The appointees — selected by board officers and Mayor Ava Frisinger — advise officials about everything including development, the environment and the arts.

The mayor reappointed 18 members and chose 20 people for other positions. Some appointees, like former Councilman Joe Forkner, serve on multiple boards.

“Congratulations, and welcome to the many volunteers who will be helping the city with a wide array of issues and important work,” Frisinger said after the council OK’d the appointments.

Rules do not require appointees to live in Issaquah, but officials said most of the members reside in the city. The council praised members for donating time and expertise to the myriad boards and commissions.

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City Council confirms board and commission appointments

May 7, 2010

NEW — 11:30 a.m. May 7, 2010

Former City Council candidates Nathan Perea and Vincent Ippolito will serve the city in a different capacity in the years ahead: as volunteer members of a city commission.

City Council members confirmed 35 appointees to city boards and commissions Monday. The appointees — selected by board officers and Mayor Ava Frisinger — advise officials about everything from development to the environment to the arts.

The mayor reappointed 18 members and chose 20 people for other positions. Some appointees, like former Councilman Joe Forkner, serve on multiple boards.

“Congratulations and welcome to the many volunteers who will be helping the city with a wide array of issues and important work,” Frisinger said after the council OK’d the appointments.

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More space needed at city’s cemetery

April 27, 2010

City Council members will consider a plan next week to accommodate additional cremated remains at the city-run cemetery.

The decision could address the dual issues of increased demand and limited space at the cemetery. The plan headed to the council May 3 recommends spending about $25,000 to install additional columbaria — niches to store cinerary urns — and benches at Issaquah Hillside Cemetery.

Residents with opinions about the cemetery plan can address the council during the public comment portion of the 7:30 p.m. meeting. Members meet in the Council Chambers at City Hall South, 135 E. Sunset Way.

Officials proposed a pair of granite columbaria and four benches for the lower section of Hillside Cemetery. Plans call for a columbarium to be added in the veterans’ area, and for the second columbarium to be installed near another, existing columbarium.

The city Cemetery Board suggested a bid from Pacific Coast Memorials, a tombstone company based in Everett and the lowest bidder. Council Services & Safety Committee members reviewed the proposal April 21, and recommended the item to the full council.

The cemetery sits perched above Newport Way Northwest on a Squak Mountain slope between West Sunset Way and Mountain Park Boulevard Southwest.

Issaquah Valley Grange honors David Waggoner as its man of the year

April 20, 2010

David Waggoner seems to be the community’s go-to guy when a volunteer is needed. Take last year, for example.

Waggoner of course accepted the offer when U.S. Rep. Dave Reichert asked him to serve on the board of volunteers of the Honor Flights Project. The project flies World War II veterans to Washington, D.C., to view the national memorial for the war.

“I was honored to give my time and effort to get as many of them back to D.C. as we could,” said Waggoner, 66, himself a veteran of the Vietnam War.

Because of his selfless efforts helping those in the community, the Issaquah Valley Grange is honoring him with its Man of the Year award for 2010 next week.

For a man who seemingly was never short on time to volunteer for one group or another, Waggoner was surprisingly short of words when it came to being honored for his efforts.

“I am humbled by the man of the year,” he said. “I have never been one before. I have no other words to say.”

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