Local U.S. Senate candidate ends campaign

May 18, 2010

Preston Republican Chris Widener dropped out of the race for U.S. Senate on April 23.

The author and motivational speaker urged Republicans to unite behind candidates in the crowded field for the GOP nomination. The nominee will face the incumbent Democrat, Patty Murray, in November.

“I am very confident that one or two of the candidates not only have the right ideas, but also the resources necessary to defeat Sen. Murray in November,” Widener wrote in a message posted on Facebook. “It is time to focus more of our precious financial resources on fewer candidates, so they can begin to reach out to more voters.”

Widener also thanked campaign supporters and early backers, including state Reps. Glenn Anderson and Jay Rodne, and King County Council members Kathy Lambert and Reagan Dunn.

Widener said he expects to be involved in the contest against Murray, despite his decision to exit the race.

“Moving forward, while I will no longer be a candidate, I will continue doing everything I can as an individual to finish what I started: defeating Patty Murray in November,” he wrote. “I will continue to work as hard as I have in the past to see Republicans elected to office.”

Preston businessman seeks Senate seat

March 2, 2010

Chris Widener

Chris Widener has two messages in his bid for the Republican nomination to challenge incumbent Democrat Sen. Patty Murray in November: no worries, no waste.

The Preston businessman is not worried about the obstacles ahead — a crowded primary election field, a potential late-entry by Dino Rossi, Murray’s vast fundraising ability. He is focused on one central message: Federal spending has to be reeled in.

Widener is hoping frustrated independent voters will help him unseat three-time incumbent Murray. He points to newly elected Republican Sen. Scott Brown’s win in Massachusetts as evidence that it could happen.

In appearances across Washington, Widener has emphasized a fiscal conservative message — attacking Murray’s role “in the federal government’s runaway spending and spiraling budget deficits” — and stayed away from social conservative issues. Read more