Vision for highlands will be focus as City Council debates gas station

December 15, 2009

A proposal to allow a gas station in the Issaquah Highlands has become the latest flashpoint in the ongoing debate about how development in the hillside community measures up to the vision offered by the developer and the city.

The dispute centers on a revision to the development agreement between the city and highlands developer Port Blakely Communities to allow a gas station to be constructed in the community. Supporters said highlands residents want a gas station for convenience and safety, when severe weather occurs and residents need fuel. Detractors argued that a gas station would be a poor fit for a community billed as “green” and pedestrian-friendly.

The amendment would overhaul the development pact between the city and Port Blakely to allow gas stations in the decade-old community. The revision includes tight language to limit what developers and operators could do with the property.

Besides gasoline, the operator would be required to offer at least one alternative fuel and three electric-vehicle charging stations. The agreement also requires the building to meet eco-friendly building standards and utilize photovoltaic panels or wind turbines to generate at least some energy for the facility. The features are part of the “energy station” concept advanced by Port Blakely executives.

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Vision for Issaquah Highlands will be focus as council debates gas station

December 15, 2009

UPDATED — 9:15 a.m. Dec. 15, 2009

A proposal to allow a gas station in the Issaquah Highlands has become the latest flashpoint in the ongoing debate about how development in the hillside community measures up to the vision offered by the developer and the city.

The dispute centers on a revision to the development agreement between the city and highlands developer Port Blakely Communities to allow a gas station to be constructed in the community. Supporters said highlands residents want a gas station for convenience and safety, when severe weather occurs and residents need fuel. Detractors argued a gas station would be a poor fit for a community billed as “green” and pedestrian-friendly.

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Many memorable mayors managed Issaquah

June 30, 2009

mayor-history-20050519cPortraits of Issaquah’s mayors can be found in a display case on the stairwell leading to the second floor of City Hall. The photos tell a great deal about the people and times of the fledgling city.

Some of the city’s early mayors were doctors, including Issaquah’s first mayor, Frank Harrell. During the Great Depression, Stella May Alexander was elected the first woman mayor, campaigning on the Taxpayers’ Ticket.

She was elected to a two-year term, defeating the Progressive ticket candidate, M.H. Clark. Ninety-three percent of the city’s registered voters cast ballots and Alexander won 195-136. She lost in a recall election the following year.

In the last half of the 20th century, mayors such as Bill Flintoft and A.J. Culver had to grapple with the emerging growth of the quiet little burg on Lake Sammamish into a thriving bedroom community to Seattle.

Harrell came to the area as the surgeon of the Seattle Coal and Iron Co. He was elected mayor of Gilman without a dissenting vote in 1892. Seven years later, the town was renamed Issaquah, after the original Indian name Is-qu-ah. Read more

Council OKs transportation plan

May 19, 2009

City Council members recently approved a plan that outlines dozens of transportation projects — from construction of the Interstate 90 Undercrossing to improving sidewalks and streets.

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City Council OKs transportation projects

May 16, 2009

NEW — 3:27 p.m. May 16, 2009

City Council members recently approved a plan that outlines dozens of transportation projects — from construction of the Interstate 90 Undercrossing to improving sidewalks and streets.

On May 4, the council unanimously approved the Transportation Improvement Program, which outlines how transportation money will be spent in the next six years.

Listed in the TIP are projects ranging from an $8.39 million project to improve Newport Way from Maple Street to West Sunset Way to safety improvements, such as the construction of a traffic roundabout at the corner of East Lake Sammamish Parkway and Southeast 43rd Way, north of Lake Sammamish State Park and near Providence Point.

City Transportation Manager Gary Costa presented the TIP to council members. He explained the role of the TIP in securing dollars for transportation projects.

“In order for a project to receive any state, federal or half-cent gas tax funding, the project must be listed in the TIP,” Costa said. “And the TIP is required to be adopted by the City Council.”

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Officials tackle transportation priorities

May 12, 2009

City officials will consider how and when to spend dollars to update facilities and roads as they review the voluminous Capital Improvement Plan during the next month. Read more

Press Editorial

April 28, 2009

Transportation plan is good communication tool

The city’s six-year Transportation Improvement Plan is a curious document. And given the interest in traffic problems here, you’d think citizens would be lining up to speak their opinion of it at a public hearing May 4. Read more

City, legislators look into an empty purse

October 22, 2008

I-90 undercrossing among projects to be put on hold

Prior to their meeting with state legislators Oct. 13, Issaquah’s mayor and City Council entertained hopes that state money might be found for local projects. Read more

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