Girl-Up Club combats gender inequality

April 22, 2015

The Eastside Catholic Girl-Up Club’s mission is to raise funds to provide the tools girls in developing countries need to acquire an education.

Billy Dimlow Eastside Catholic         High School

Billy Dimlow
Eastside Catholic
High School

Kate Christensen, Fiona Madden, Sienna Colburn and Meredith Troy founded the Girl-Up Club to combat the gender inequality still deeply ingrained in our world.

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The Beat — Teen Talk

April 22, 2015

Andres Rincon, senior “I think that it can actually be pretty hard for guys, too, because there’s a pressure to not be able to express our feelings, to become closer with other people and to pursue our true interests. I also am bothered by how constricted women are in certain situations with what they’re able to achieve.”

Andres Rincon, senior
“I think that it can actually be pretty hard for guys, too, because there’s a pressure to not be able to express our feelings, to become closer with other people and to pursue our true interests. I also am bothered by how constricted women are in certain situations with what they’re able to achieve.”

Emma Abraham, junior “At my last high school, I had a really bad experience with gender stereotypes, but coming to Eastside Catholic has been better because we all see ourselves as equal. Unfortunately, gender stereotypes are common in high schools because the guys think they’re better than the girls and the girls think they’re better than the guys.”

Emma Abraham, junior
“At my last high school, I had a really bad experience with gender stereotypes, but coming to Eastside Catholic has been better because we all see ourselves as equal. Unfortunately, gender stereotypes are common in high schools because the guys think they’re better than the girls and the girls think they’re better than the guys.”

Amey Sharma, senior “I’ve only had negative experiences with gender stereotypes. For example, I wanted to wear my flower crown when I was going to hang out with my friends, but my mother wouldn’t let me wear it because she thinks that only girls can wear them and I got into a massive argument with her about it and how gender stereotypes are dumb.”

Amey Sharma, senior
“I’ve only had negative experiences with gender stereotypes. For example, I wanted to wear my flower crown when I was going to hang out with my friends, but my mother wouldn’t let me wear it because she thinks that only girls can wear them and I got into a massive argument with her about it and how gender stereotypes are dumb.”

Megan Freer, sophomore “As a child, I was enrolled in ballet and given dolls to play with simply because I am a girl, although that is what I naturally drifted toward as well. I have also been told multiple times that as a girl interested in the STEM fields, there will always be a job available to me, due to the scarcity of women in those fields.”

Megan Freer, sophomore
“As a child, I was enrolled in ballet and given dolls to play with simply because I am a girl, although that is what I naturally drifted toward as well. I have also been told multiple times that as a girl interested in the STEM fields, there will always be a job available to me, due to the scarcity of women in those fields.”

Logan Allan, sophomore “Gender stereotypes have influenced my life by limiting ways that I could express myself because it wouldn’t be ‘ladylike.’ I didn’t feel comfortable admitting that I liked ‘Star Wars’ in elementary school because it wasn’t a girly thing to like in the eye of society.”

Logan Allan, sophomore
“Gender stereotypes have influenced my life by limiting ways that I could express myself because it wouldn’t be ‘ladylike.’ I didn’t feel comfortable admitting that I liked ‘Star Wars’ in elementary school because it wasn’t a girly thing to like in the eye of society.”

Ian Page, senior “My experience with gender stereotypes at Liberty has thankfully been rather small. The only thing that comes to mind when I think about gender roles is the expectation to ask girls to homecoming and to prom — it’s challenging for people to work up that courage and there is no way to go against the grain with girls asking guys.”

Ian Page, senior
“My experience with gender stereotypes at Liberty has thankfully been rather small. The only thing that comes to mind when I think about gender roles is the expectation to ask girls to homecoming and to prom — it’s challenging for people to work up that courage and there is no way to go against the grain with girls asking guys.”

Arjun Kumar, junior “I have found gender stereotypes toward men to be weak enough to overcome relatively easily. However, I have had to put in a lot more effort toward overcome the gender stereotypes that exist toward girls.”

Arjun Kumar, junior
“I have found gender stereotypes toward men to be weak enough to overcome relatively easily. However, I have had to put in a lot more effort toward overcome the gender stereotypes that exist toward girls.”

Lasya Reddy, junior “My whole life, being Indian, I have been subjected to stereotypes regarding each and every aspect of my life. I was always expected to be the one to participate and be No. 1 at everything. My brother, though he was expected to work hard, was given more leniency when it came to the product of his work.”

Lasya Reddy, junior
“My whole life, being Indian, I have been subjected to stereotypes regarding each and every aspect of my life. I was always expected to be the one to participate and be No. 1 at everything. My brother, though he was expected to work hard, was given more leniency when it came to the product of his work.”

Student athletes and the consequences of drugs

March 25, 2015

Among student athletes, the pressure to do drugs, both recreational and performance-enhancing, may seem to run high.

Marissa Secreto Eastside Catholic         High School

Marissa Secreto
Eastside Catholic
High School

However, the opposite is actually true. The pressure not to take part in drug use, due to strong punishments and repercussions, keeps athletes clean and less liable to the harmful effects of drugs.

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The Beat — Teen Talk

March 25, 2015

What do you think about the legalization of marijuana?

Ryan Nguyen, LHS junior “I believe that incrimination based on drug-possession is wrong; addiction to drugs is a medical problem, and one should not become a criminal because of it. Therefore, I believe that the legalization of marijuana can change society’s view toward drug-users as not criminals but as people with a health issue.”

Ryan Nguyen, LHS junior
“I believe that incrimination based on drug-possession is wrong; addiction to drugs is a medical problem, and one should not become a criminal because of it. Therefore, I believe that the legalization of marijuana can change society’s view toward drug-users as not criminals but as people with a health issue.”

Rachael Russel, LHS senior “I think it’s pointless that marijuana has been legalized because people had access to it before, so legalizing it really didn’t change much.”

Rachael Russel, LHS senior
“I think it’s pointless that marijuana has been legalized because people had access to it before, so legalizing it really didn’t change much.”

Kalyn Crickmore, IHS senior “I think that marijuana should be legalized for medical use, but I don’t really see the necessity of having it for recreational use.”

Kalyn Crickmore, IHS senior
“I think that marijuana should be legalized for medical use, but I don’t really see the necessity of having it for recreational use.”

Dylan Martorano, IHS junior “I think it’s great that marijuana has been legalized! As long as the drug is being used safely, I’m happy to see that it could be of importance to so many people in Washington.”

Dylan Martorano, IHS junior
“I think it’s great that marijuana has been legalized! As long as the drug is being used safely, I’m happy to see that it could be of importance to so many people in Washington.”

Claire Wright, ECHS junior “I don’t care because it doesn’t really affect me. I don’t really think it matters what other people do.”

Claire Wright, ECHS junior
“I don’t care because it doesn’t really affect me. I don’t really think it matters what other people do.”

Marek Kossik, ECHS senior “It’s good because it takes business away from drug cartels and gives money to the state government.”

Marek Kossik, ECHS senior
“It’s good because it takes business away from drug cartels and gives money to the state government.”

Angela Shi, SHS freshman “I don’t approve of it, and I feel like marijuana should still be illegal because it can cause lifelong consequences that are detrimental to your health.”

Angela Shi, SHS freshman
“I don’t approve of it, and I feel like marijuana should still be illegal because it can cause lifelong consequences that are detrimental to your health.”

Manu Sharma, SHS junior “I feel that legalization is fine as long as it doesn’t affect others. To smoke marijuana is a choice that someone makes, and it is necessary to be respectful of that choice.”

Manu Sharma, SHS junior
“I feel that legalization is fine as long as it doesn’t affect others. To smoke marijuana is a choice that someone makes, and it is necessary to be respectful of that choice.”

The Beat — Teen Talk

February 24, 2015

Should colleges base their admissions on standardized test scores?

Raman Kaur, senior, LHS “No, because you can’t wrap up 12 years worth of education in one test score.”

Raman Kaur, senior, LHS
“No, because you can’t wrap up 12 years worth of education in one test score.”

Hayley Murdoch, senior, LHS “No. Colleges should base their admissions on GPA, references and essays, because they show the long-term improvement and intelligence of the student.”

Hayley Murdoch, senior, LHS
“No. Colleges should base their admissions on GPA, references and essays, because they show the long-term improvement and intelligence of the student.”

Sabrina Loos, sophomore, SHS “Yes … standardized tests remain the same through every school district, nationwide. Therefore, they provide the only unbiased way to compare students academic ability, regardless of different grading scales or teacher leniency.”

Sabrina Loos, sophomore, SHS
“Yes … standardized tests remain the same through every school district, nationwide. Therefore, they provide the only unbiased way to compare students academic ability, regardless of different grading scales or teacher leniency.”

Paul Kim, junior, SHS “No, because, in my opinion, they do not accurately depict the intelligence of the student, and it takes credit away from the achievements that students have received in their school work.”

Paul Kim, junior, SHS
“No, because, in my opinion, they do not accurately depict the intelligence of the student, and it takes credit away from the achievements that students have received in their school work.”

Tristana Leist, senior, ECHS “Colleges should use standardized testing as a baseline but not as a factor carrying more than 30 percent of the weight in the application. All colleges should conduct personal interviews as part of the admissions process.”

Tristana Leist, senior, ECHS
“Colleges should use standardized testing as a baseline but not as a factor carrying more than 30 percent of the weight in the application. All colleges should conduct personal interviews as part of the admissions process.”

Jack Morgan, junior, ECHS “Absolutely not, because standardized tests don’t test how smart you are. They only test how much money you have to pay for prep courses.”

Jack Morgan, junior, ECHS
“Absolutely not, because standardized tests don’t test how smart you are. They only test how much money you have to pay for prep courses.”

Namrata Chintalapati, junior, IHS “Standardized tests present an extremely narrow depiction of a student’s abilities, because privileged children have the resources to prepare for tests like the SAT or ACT better, and that therefore skews the representation of how ‘smart’ a student is.”

Namrata Chintalapati, junior, IHS
“Standardized tests present an extremely narrow depiction of a student’s abilities, because privileged children have the resources to prepare for tests like the SAT or ACT better, and that therefore skews the representation of how ‘smart’ a student is.”

Kunal Gupta, senior, IHS “For me, my ACT score was a way to show college that I am knowledgeable separate of what they see from my GPA.”

Kunal Gupta, senior, IHS
“For me, my ACT score was a way to show college that I am knowledgeable separate of what they see from my GPA.”

Chase Steiner named as national youth delegate

February 10, 2015

Chase Steiner, a student at Eastside Catholic High School, has been selected to represent Washington as a National Youth Delegate to the 2015 Washington Youth Summit on the Environment at George Mason University.

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Girls fight bullies, Find Kind in club

November 26, 2014

Four years ago, Eastside Catholic High School welcomed guest speakers Lauren Parsekian and Molly Thompson to talk about their campaign and film — “Finding Kind” — that discussed the cause and effects of girl-on-girl bullying.

Marissa Secreto Eastside Catholic         High School

Marissa Secreto
Eastside Catholic
High School

The idea caught fire: Shortly after Parsekian and Thompson’s visit, EC created its own club under the same name, where middle-school and high-school girls could meet up once a week and discuss bullying prevention.

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Young Issaquah violinist to play in Pioneer Square

August 19, 2014

Issaquah teen Alena Hove will perform in a Pioneer Square pop-up concert Aug. 26.

Hove, a student at Eastside Catholic High School, will play the violin, an instrument that helped her win the 2014 KING FM Young Artist Award for the junior division of ages 6-15.

The 15-year-old performs from noon to 1 p.m. at Pioneer Square’s Occidental Park at the corner of South Main Street and Occidental Avenue South in Seattle.

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Queen of the KING FM contest

July 29, 2014

Alena Hove wins Young Artist Award

Alena Hove, an Eastside Catholic High School student, performs at KING FM studios. She won the 2014 KING FM Young Artist Award for her skill on the violin. Courtesy KING FM

Alena Hove, an Eastside Catholic High School student, performs at KING FM studios. She won the 2014 KING FM Young Artist Award for her skill on the violin. Courtesy KING FM

When she was a young child, Alena Hove’s first music teacher always told her and the rest of her classmates one thing when it came to music: On all the days you eat meals, you need to practice.

Hove, who is heading into her sophomore year at Eastside Catholic High School this fall, took that piece of advice to heart, and it has paid off. Hove’s talent as a violinist won her the 2014 KING FM Young Artist Award for the junior division of ages 6-15.

“I do a lot of competitions,” the 15-year-old said. “So, preparing for them helps me keep improving, as well as going to different teachers to see what they think about my music.”

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Issaquah’s Alena Hove wins the 2014 KING FM Young Artist Award for the junior division

July 19, 2014

NEW — 6 a.m. July 19, 2014

When she was a young child, Alena Hove’s first music teacher always told her and the rest of her classmates one thing when it came to music: On all the days you eat meals, you need to practice.

Hove, who is heading into her sophomore year at Eastside Catholic High School this fall, took that piece of advice to heart, and it has paid off. Hove’s talent as a violinist won her the 2014 KING FM Young Artist Award for the junior division of ages 6-15.

“I do a lot of competitions,” the 15-year-old said. “So, preparing for them helps me keep improving, as well as going to different teachers to see what they think about my music.”

Courtesy KING FM Eastside Catholic High School student Alena Hove performs at KING FM studios. She won the 2014 KING FM Young Artist Award for her skill on the violin.

Courtesy KING FM
Eastside Catholic High School student Alena Hove performs at KING FM studios. The Issaquah 15-year-old won the 2014 KING FM Young Artist Award for her skill on the violin.

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