Issaquah teachers join walkout to protest state’s education funding

May 27, 2015

About 80 percent of the approximately 1,100 teachers in the Issaquah School District were part of last week’s one-day walkout May 19, said Doug Jones, president of the Issaquah Education Association, the local teacher’s union.

By Greg Farrar Issaquah School District teachers, along with the support of students and their parents, picketed by the hundreds at two locations in downtown Issaquah May 19 to pressure state legislators to obey the state constitution’s mandate to fully fund K-12 public education.

By Greg Farrar
Issaquah School District teachers, along with the support of students and their parents, picketed by the hundreds at two locations in downtown Issaquah May 19 to pressure state legislators to obey the state constitution’s mandate to fully fund K-12 public education.

In most cases with parents and students joining them, teachers lined the streets in eight locations, calling for state legislators to fully fund education, to meet the demands of the state Supreme Court McCleary decision, which makes paying for basic education the fundamental job for the state.

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Issaquah teachers walk out to protest lack of state funding

May 19, 2015

NEW — 12:10 p.m. May 19, 2015

By Greg Farrar Issaquah School District teachers along with the support of students and their parents picketed by the hundreds at two locations in downtown Issaquah May 19 to pressure state legislators to obey the state Constitution’s mandate to fully fund K-12 public education.

By Greg Farrar
Issaquah School District teachers along with the support of students and their parents picketed by the hundreds at two locations in downtown Issaquah May 19 to pressure state legislators to obey the state Constitution’s mandate to fully fund K-12 public education.

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Nourish Every Mind Luncheon raises $617,000 to benefit students and schools

May 16, 2015

NEW — 1:40 p.m. May 16, 2015

Almost 900 community members attended the Issaquah Schools Foundation’s 17th annual Nourish Every Mind Luncheon on May 14 at the Issaquah Community Center and donated $617,000 for local schools.

The program featured several students and educators who spoke passionately about the foundation’s impact on education.

Nourish Every Mind continues next week with the second annual Nourish Every Mind Breakfast on May 20 at Eastridge Church. Proceeds of both events will fund programs that benefit students throughout the district.

Reserve your seat or learn more by calling the foundation at 391-8557 or emailing becky@isfdn.org.

Girl-Up Club combats gender inequality

April 22, 2015

The Eastside Catholic Girl-Up Club’s mission is to raise funds to provide the tools girls in developing countries need to acquire an education.

Billy Dimlow Eastside Catholic         High School

Billy Dimlow
Eastside Catholic
High School

Kate Christensen, Fiona Madden, Sienna Colburn and Meredith Troy founded the Girl-Up Club to combat the gender inequality still deeply ingrained in our world.

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Education and roads key topics as state lawmakers visit area

March 17, 2015

State legislators descended on their Eastside jurisdictions March 14, holding open houses in Bellevue and Issaquah.

At Bellevue’s Somerset Elementary School, one main topic was education, with dozens of teachers outside, and later inside, carrying signs mostly declaring, “It’s time to fully fund education.”

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Governor visits issaquah

February 10, 2015

By Greg Farrar Gov. Jay Inslee talks environmental science with Anna Craig, an Eastlake High School junior, Feb. 4 in the computer lab at the YWCA Family Village Issaquah.

By Greg Farrar
Gov. Jay Inslee talks environmental science with Anna Craig, an Eastlake High School junior, Feb. 4 in the computer lab at the YWCA Family Village Issaquah.

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Failing-school letters to go out

August 19, 2014

School districts include retort

Because most Washington school districts don’t have 100 percent of their students passing state math and reading tests, the federal No Child Left Behind law says the districts must send letters to families explaining why.

But the districts don’t have to like it, and 28 school superintendents have jointly written a second letter they will send along with the first, explaining why they think their schools are doing much better than the No Child letters make it seem.

“Some of our state’s and districts’ most successful and highly recognized schools are now being labeled ‘failing’ by an antiquated law that most educators and elected officials — as well as the U.S. Department of Education — acknowledge isn’t working,” the cover letter states.

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Editorial — The kids are (probably) all right

August 19, 2014

Sometime soon, some area parents will get a pair of letters. One is a federally mandated notice informing them their child’s school is failing. The other, likely included in the same envelope, will tell them not to worry about what the first letter says — things are just fine.

The mixed message will undoubtedly confuse some.

Here we are: 2014 was the year that every child in America was supposed to be at grade level standard in math and reading, according to the federal No Child Left Behind law.

The idea was well-meaning, but obviously flawed. While pretty much everyone agrees the law needs revisions, revisions mean Congress needs to get involved. Since Congress can barely agree on the color of the sky, it’s unlikely to see revisions any time soon.

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Four candidates face off in 5th District primary

July 8, 2014

Voters will have four choices for state representative in the 5th Legislative District primary Aug. 5.

The two candidates who receive the most votes will run in the Nov. 4 general election.

Incumbent Republican Chad Magendanz will run again. He touts his expertise on educational issues and his willingness to reach across the aisle as reasons for residents to re-elect him.

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Editorial – Good luck, graduates; welcome to adulthood

June 17, 2014

Since kindergarten, you schlepped books to and from school. You were expected to learn the basics: reading, writing and arithmetic. You hopefully learned how to share, how to make friends, and how to become part of a social and cultural group.

Perhaps you were fortunate enough to delve into extracurricular activities like art, choir, playing an instrument, drama, sports, debate or yearbook staff. Most importantly, you hopefully learned to be an individual in a sea of sameness, as well as how to be a critical thinker.

For some, high school goes down as the best times of life — the camaraderie, close friendships, being part of a team.

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