Atlas redevelopment project approved for Seventh and Gilman

May 13, 2014

Redevelopment of Seventh Avenue Northwest and Northwest Gilman Boulevard earned Development Commission approval May 7.

The city Development Commission welcomed the topic during two three-hour meetings April 16 and May 7. The commission received presentations from designers GGLO Architects, the city’s Development Services Department, as well as an outpouring of public comments. During the latter meeting, the commission unanimously approved the permit application.

“It’s got another new name since last we met,” City Senior Planner Jerry Lind said during the May 7 meeting. “It’s now called ‘Atlas’. We’ve seen the name Cadence. That one you want to erase from your mind. It’s evolved and it’s possible it could change again.”

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The green necklace: a gift to the city and the environment

February 21, 2014

More and more, people within the city are talking about the planned “green necklace.” It isn’t a gift of jewelry to citizens, but many see it as a gift to residents nonetheless.

The green necklace refers to a circle of parks and open spaces around the city, allowing easy pedestrian and bicycle access. It includes Lake Sammamish and the Issaquah Alps in the goal to surround the city and provide interconnected pathways between open spaces.

By Peter Clark Anne McGill, Issaquah Parks & Recreation Department director, visits the future Phase 3 site of Confluence Park, in an area she hopes the city will name ‘Margaret’s Meadow’ in honor of late park planner Margaret Macleod.

By Peter Clark
Anne McGill, Issaquah Parks & Recreation Department director, visits the future Phase 3 site of Confluence Park, in an area she hopes the city will name ‘Margaret’s Meadow’ in honor of late park planner Margaret Macleod.

Though the idea has existed for decades, the Issaquah City Council expressly outlined a plan to create the network of open space in the Central Issaquah Plan, approved in December 2012.

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Issaquah reimagined

February 21, 2014

How will the central district look in 30 years?

Since before the City Council passed the Central Issaquah Plan in late 2012, citizens have been wondering what the city will look like in 30 years.

“You’re standing in a great pedestrian area,” Issaquah Long Range Planner Trish Heinonen said, describing the average block according to the plan. “It will be very busy with walking people and people having lunch. And wherever you are standing, you can probably see a way to get to the green necklace.”

By Greg Farrar A 2002 aerial view shows Issaquah’s central district then. Now, city leaders are envisioning in the Central Issaquah Plan what the area would look like in 30 years.

By Greg Farrar
A 2002 aerial view shows Issaquah’s central district then. Now, city leaders are envisioning in the Central Issaquah Plan what the area would look like in 30 years.

As a vision for how to cultivate a dense, urban space within the central area and redevelop the flat lots into sustainable, walkable parcels, the Central Issaquah Plan has remained vague beyond the expressed desire to create a vivid environment with a “green necklace” of parks and open spaces around the city and an interlaced connection of walkways and bike paths to reach them.

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Gilman Square plan could add 340 residences

October 22, 2013

Contributed This architectural drawing shows the three building proposed for a redeveloped Gilman Square.

Contributed
This architectural drawing shows the three building proposed for a redeveloped Gilman Square.

A pre-application for three five-story buildings at Gilman Square could mark the first test of the Central Issaquah Plan.

Developer Lennar Multifamily Investors wishes to turn the 6.7-acre site, the home of Lombardi’s Restaurant until it shut its doors in July, into a large residential location. They entered talks with the city in September before submitting a pre-application in early October.

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Park bond committees seeks new community members

July 23, 2013

City officials are seeking community members to serve on pro and con committees to address the park bond measure, which will go to vote in November.

Members of the committees will help educate voters by writing 200-word statements in favor of or in opposition to the measure. The statements will appear in the King County Local Voters’ Pamphlet that voters receive before the election. There is a limit of three members per committee.

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