Historic oaks receive Heritage Trees designation

March 6, 2012

Mayor Ava Frisinger designated a trio of historic oaks as Heritage Trees — a distinction meant to reflect the plants’ age, size, historic significance and ecological importance, officials announced Feb. 24.

Early residents planted the Bur oak trees — believed to be the largest and oldest in Issaquah — more than 75 years ago near modern-day 495 Sycamore Lane.

City Park Board members developed the Heritage Tree Program to promote identification and recognition of trees that reflect the character of Issaquah. Each Heritage Tree is identified and recorded in a register maintained by the city Parks & Recreation Department.

“I urge all citizens to enjoy and protect our Heritage Trees and to appreciate the value that these and other trees give our community,” Frisinger said.

The mayor did not designate any Heritage Trees last year. The most recent round — announced in 2010 — included thee giant sequoia at Tibbetts Valley Park, the Empress Tree at Cornick Park and the Oregon white oak at the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery.

Mayor Ava Frisinger designates historic oaks as Heritage Trees

February 27, 2012

NEW — 6 a.m. Feb. 27, 2012

Mayor Ava Frisinger designated a trio of historic oaks as Heritage Trees — a distinction meant to reflect the plants’ age, size, historic significance and ecological importance.

Early residents planted the Bur oak trees — believed to be the largest and oldest in Issaquah — more than 75 years ago near modern-day 495 Sycamore Lane.

City Park Board members developed the Heritage Tree Program to promote identification and recognition of trees that reflect the character of Issaquah. Each Heritage Tree is identified and recorded in a register maintained by the city Parks & Recreation Department.

“I urge all citizens to enjoy and protect our Heritage Trees and to appreciate the value that these and other trees give our community,” Frisinger said.

The mayor did not designate any Heritage Trees last year.

The most recent round — announced in 2010 — included the giant sequoia at Tibbetts Valley Park, the Empress Tree at Cornick Park and the Oregon white oak at the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery.

Mayor highlights Heritage Trees

November 16, 2010

Mayor Ava Frisinger has designated a trio of landmark trees as Heritage Trees — a distinction meant to reflect the age, size, historic significance and ecological value of the plants.

The trees include the giant sequoia at Tibbetts Valley Park, the Empress Tree at Cornick Park and the Oregon white oak at the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery. Read more

Mayor highlights latest crop of Heritage Trees

October 23, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. Oct. 23, 2010

Mayor Ava Frisinger has designated a trio of landmark trees as Heritage Trees — a distinction meant to reflect the age, size, historic significance and ecological value of the plants.

The trees include the giant sequoia at Tibbetts Valley Park, the Empress Tree at Cornick Park and the Oregon white oak at the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery.

City Park Board members developed the Heritage Tree Program to promote identification and recognition of trees that reflect the character of Issaquah. Every Heritage Tree is identified and recorded in a register maintained by the city Parks & Recreation Department.

Read more

Growing legacy: Issaquah reigns as Tree City USA

April 20, 2010

The mayor and city brass gathered to celebrate Arbor Day last April beneath dull gray skies — a bare, drab scene unlike the leafy canopy shading Issaquah streets in summertime.

City leaders and residents gather every spring to plant the official Arbor Day tree: a Burr oak near Gibson Hall last year, a crabapple at Grand Ridge Elementary School the year before. The annual ceremony serves as more than a photo opportunity.

Officials will mark Arbor Day indoors next week, with a presentation by city Open Space Steward Matt Mechler to the municipal Park Board.

Issaquah, designated as a Tree City USA for the past 16 years, is required to observe and proclaim Arbor Day to maintain the designation. Officials mark the day with a tree planting, and select a ceremonial tree for each occasion.

City Arborist Alan Haywood oversees the urban forest and ensures that Issaquah keeps the Tree City USA distinction — no small feat in a city where tree canopy covers 51 percent of the municipality.

Read more

Mayor picks new Heritage Trees

December 13, 2009

NEW — 6 a.m. Dec. 13, 2009

Mayor Ava Frisinger proclaimed three trees as Heritage Trees last week — a designation meant to reflect the age, size, historic significance and ecological value of the woody plants.

The tree trio, at 317 Gilman Blvd. N.W., includes: the Coast Redwood, the Blue Atlas Cedar and the Bigleaf Magnolia.

City Park Board members developed the Heritage Tree Program to promote identification and recognition of trees that reflect the character of Issaquah. Every heritage tree is identified and recorded in a register maintained by the city Parks and Recreation Department.

“I urge all citizens to enjoy and protect our Heritage Trees and to appreciate the value that these and other trees give our community,” Frisinger said in a news release.