Opening the archives

April 8, 2014

72.021.014.129 Lawill’s Rexall Drug Store interior p89, #138 Arcadia book caption: Lou and Gertie Lawill ran Lawill’s Drug Store, on Front Street. Long-time residents recall purchasing everything from comic books and candy to gifts and medication at the store. Notice the sign for Alpine ice cream in the bottom right corner of this 1951 photograph. Gertie and Lou Lawill stand behind the counter. The store was located on the southeast corner of Front and Alder streets.

72.021.014.129
Lawill’s Rexall Drug Store interior
p89, #138 Arcadia book caption:
Lou and Gertie Lawill ran Lawill’s Drug Store, on Front Street. Long-time residents recall purchasing everything from comic books and candy to gifts and medication at the store. Notice the sign for Alpine ice cream in the bottom right corner of this 1951 photograph. Gertie and Lou Lawill stand behind the counter. The store was located on the southeast corner of Front and Alder streets.

The Issaquah History Museums take requests regarding what people would like to see in the Digital Collection. Roughly quarterly, volunteers have a data-entry day and prep a bunch of records for upload. If there is a particular name, place or item you’d like to see more images of on the website, email Erica Maniez at erica.maniez@issaquahhistory.org. If you have a photo or subject you would like to see in this feature, email editor@isspress.com.

 

Opening the archives

April 1, 2014

The Issaquah History Museums take requests regarding what people would like to see in the Digital Collection. Roughly quarterly, volunteers have a data-entry day and prep a bunch of records for upload. If there is a particular name, place or item you’d like to see more images of on the website, email Erica Maniez at erica.maniez@issaquahhistory.org. If you have a photo or subject you would like to see in this feature, email editor@isspress.com.

2002.001.020 Ida May Tibbetts Goode and John Maurice Goode sat for a portrait about a month after their Feb. 11, 1893, wedding. Ida, the daughter of George Washington Tibbetts, was 19. Pearl Tibbetts was close to her cousin, Ida. Taken by Hardy, 314 Pike St., Seattle.

2002.001.020
Ida May Tibbetts Goode and John Maurice Goode sat for a portrait about a month after their Feb. 11, 1893, wedding. Ida, the daughter of George Washington Tibbetts, was 19. Pearl Tibbetts was close to her cousin, Ida. Taken by Hardy, 314 Pike St., Seattle.

Opening the archives

March 25, 2014

An ongoing look at memorable images from Issaquah’s past

Baseball, circa 1940-1955

Paul Koss and his baseball team decided to dress in drag for a game. The ensemble was completed by very large tennis shoes that flapped when he ran. The other team, whose pitcher was E. Croston, got wind of the cross-dressing and did the same.

2011.019.001

 

The Issaquah History Museums take requests regarding what people would like to see in the Digital Collection. Roughly quarterly, volunteers have a data-entry day and prep a bunch of records for upload. If there is a particular name, place or item you’d like to see more images of on the website, email Erica Maniez at erica.maniez@issaquahhistory.org. If you have a photo or subject you would like to see in this feature, email editor@isspress.com.

Espionage and coal: Mining Issaquah’s World War I history

March 18, 2014

It was July 29, 1914. Austria launched a bomb attack on Serbia, and Russia commenced mobilization for an attack on Austria. The German “Count” Gustav Konstantin Alvo von Alvensleben was in Germany, where the government was about to declare war on France and Russia.

On that same day, in the small town of Issaquah, Dave and Ann Morgan welcomed their first child, Ivor, into the world. He was born in coal company housing owned by von Alvensleben.

File This is most likely an occasion described in a Seattle Times article from July 19, 1013, which read in part, ‘Two hundred fuel dealers and their wives... were the guests of the Issaquah & Superior Coal Mining Company at its mines in Issaquah... The trip was made in a special train of three cars that left King Street Station at 9:30.’ The article describes the procession from the Issaquah Depot to the mine offices, where Issaquah Mayor P.J. Smith gave a rousing speech. The coal company’s sales manager, J. F. Grant, replied with the interesting (if not true) fact that Issaquah meant ‘beautiful maiden,’ whereupon he welcomed Blodwyn Watkins, ‘the pretty daughter of Superintendent J. R. Watkins, dressed in Indian costume, who emerged from a stand erected for the purpose.’

File
This is most likely an occasion described in a Seattle Times article from July 19, 1013, which read in part, ‘Two hundred fuel dealers and their wives… were the guests of the Issaquah & Superior Coal Mining Company at its mines in Issaquah… The trip was made in a special train of three cars that left King Street Station at 9:30.’ The article describes the procession from the Issaquah Depot to the mine offices, where Issaquah Mayor P.J. Smith gave a rousing speech. The coal company’s sales manager, J. F. Grant, replied with the interesting (if not true) fact that Issaquah meant ‘beautiful maiden,’ whereupon he welcomed Blodwyn Watkins, ‘the pretty daughter of Superintendent J. R. Watkins, dressed in Indian costume, who emerged from a stand erected for the purpose.’

While von Alvensleben made plans to return to North America, Dave Morgan tended donkeys for von Alvensleben’s Issaquah and Superior Coal Mine on the west side of town. The donkeys hauled carts of coal from the dark, dusty, noisy and wet depths of the mines to the surface, where the coal was crushed, sorted and cleaned in preparation for shipment.

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Community Cornerstone

February 21, 2014

May 30, 1911, was a special occasion for Issaquah resident Mabel Ek.

So special, in fact, that the moment called for a new outfit. Ek arrived at Issaquah’s Baptist Church, near what is now the Darigold plant, wearing a new dress, knitted gloves and shoes specially ordered from Oregon.

City residents, of which there were only 500 at the time, arrived in droves to honor Ek and her classmates Mary and Olive Gibson.

Issaquah History Museums FIC.2000.049   The 1921 Issaquah High School women’s basketball team are (from left) May Wilkinson, Alix Sween, Erma Brown, Pearl Peck, Marie Chevalier, Alene O’Connor, Julia Erickson and Mildred Thompson.

Issaquah History Museums FIC.2000.049
The 1921 Issaquah High School women’s basketball team are (from left) May Wilkinson, Alix Sween, Erma Brown, Pearl Peck, Marie Chevalier, Alene O’Connor, Julia Erickson and Mildred Thompson.

After all, the three were about to make history, representing the very first graduating class of Issaquah High School.

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Google doesn’t know all about Thanksgiving

November 26, 2013

When I heard department stores were opening up on Thanksgiving Day this year, I wanted to write a profound column about the true meaning of Thanksgiving. But to do so, I needed to double-check the actual facts about the original dinner party.

So I Googled “The True History of Thanksgiving” and was surprised by how much the “facts” differed.

David Hayes Press reporter

David Hayes Press reporter

The first hit links to a rather acerbic article that hotly posits that the first day of Thanksgiving was proclaimed by Massachusetts Colony Gov. John Winthrop. Apparently, he actually called for a celebration upon the safe return of a hunting party after they successfully massacred 700 Pequot Indians. Not the history lesson I grew up with, and since the author didn’t list his sources, I cannot verify the veracity of his claims.

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Local history ‘doodle’ book is aimed at kids

November 26, 2013

Once a small logging village, Issaquah was settled in the 1860s and officially incorporated in 1892. Landmarks still exist around town from the early days, reminding citizens of the area’s rich heritage.

The problem is, the histories of these sites have been slowly fading away, and newer residents — including families — likely have no idea what they represent.

 

Tom Anderson

Tom Anderson

Enter Tom Anderson, a software engineer and secretary of the board of the Issaquah History Museums. Two years ago at an ArtWalk, Anderson was wandering with his daughter when he hit upon an idea of a “doodle” book for children so they could learn more about their historic town.

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State archives branch holds workshops Saturday

October 11, 2013

NEW — 6 a.m. Oct. 11, 2013

The Washington State Archives is celebrating archives month with two local workshops designed to help citizens preserve history.

In “Uncovering the History of Your House in King County,” archivists will explain how to find intriguing information from diverse sources that will enrich understanding and appreciation for King County residents.

“The Basics of Digital Archiving” teaches how to safeguard personal treasures for future generations.

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Off The Press

September 24, 2013

Go places, learn new things on the cheap

 Do you have a King County library card? At the low price of free, it’s one of the best values on the planet.

I’ve been an avid reader since I was a little kid. Oh, the lives and worlds I’ve escaped into. Books can do that.

Kathleen R. Merrill Press managing editor

Kathleen R. Merrill
Press managing editor

I still have my first library card, which I got when I was 5. I also have my library awards from reading contests when I was a child. If they said read 50 books, I read 100. Ahh, nostalgia.

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History Museums receive grant from 4Culture

September 17, 2013

4Culture’s Heritage Collections Care program recently awarded $4,850 to the Issaquah History Museums for its Move Ready project.

The award was part of 4Culture’s sixth annual Heritage Collections Care Funding Program.

In total, 4Culture donated $63,655 to 23 King County nonprofit organizations to support the conservation of their historic collections. The awards ranged from $977 to $5,000, with the Issaquah History Museums receiving the second-largest grant.

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