Issaquah human services campus study is due in October

August 24, 2010

NEW — 6 a.m. Aug. 24, 2010

City leaders last week outlined ideas for a human services campus — a clearinghouse for charities providing food, healthcare and employment services to the needy.

Mayor Ava Frisinger and other top officials met representatives from the San Francisco-based consultant conducting a city-funded feasibility study on the proposed campus.

In addition to gathering input from Issaquah leaders, the consultant collected demographic information to determine a possible service area for the facility.

Former Councilman John Rittenhouse — a longtime proponent of the campus who left the council in December and then joined the Family Resource Center board of directors — updated council members about the study Aug. 16.

Read more

Council sets 2011 goals

June 29, 2010

The ambitious agenda for 2011 calls for the city to turn Issaquah into a mountain-biking destination, decide whether to annex Klahanie and surrounding neighborhoods, and continue to promote Issaquah to prospective businesses.

City Council members OK’d goals for 2011 last week, and handed Mayor Ava Frisinger a broad set of priorities to be accomplished next year. The decision represents the first step in the process to shape the 2011 city budget.

Department chiefs start to prepare the budget in summer. Frisinger then delivers a proposal to the council by October. Members mold the proposal into a final budget, and the council approves the spending plan in late December.

The list also calls for the city to improve transportation, foster economic development and reduce environmental impact.

The council seeks to build a mountain bike park in Issaquah and connect city trails to regional mountain biking trails. Though the process could take several years to complete, council members directed city staffers to start the process next year.

Read more

City Council sets goals, including plan to make Issaquah a mountain-biking mecca

June 26, 2010

NEW — 7 a.m. June 26, 2010

The ambitious agenda for 2011 calls for the city to turn Issaquah into a mountain-biking destination, decide whether to annex Klahanie and surrounding neighborhoods, and continue to promote Issaquah to prospective businesses.

City Council members OK’d goals for 2011 on Monday, and handed Mayor Ava Frisinger a broad set of priorities to be accomplished next year. The decision represents the first step in the process to shape the 2011 city budget.

Department chiefs start to prepare the budget in the summer. The mayor then delivers a proposal to the council by October. Members mold the proposal into a final budget, and the council approves the spending plan in late December.

Read more

Press Editorial

March 30, 2010

City should not own a human services campus

The idea of bringing human service nonprofit agencies together in one location to best serve the clients is not a new idea. It has been tried and proven successful at the Family Resource Center in Redmond. Read more

Survey shows strong interest in human services campus

March 30, 2010

The proposed Issaquah human services campus could offer a range of services — healthcare, youth and family counseling, assistance to seniors — supporters said last week. Read more

Development of Issaquah human services campus inches forward

March 22, 2010

NEW — 4:45 p.m. March 22, 2010

Issaquah stands a step closer to opening a human services campus, after a Redmond nonprofit completed a city-funded survey to gauge interest in a campus.

Family Resource Center officials announced the completion of the survey Monday. The nonprofit surveyed 50 organizations; 25 responded and 14 respondents indicated interest in participating in the Issaquah campus.

Officials envision the campus as a clearinghouse where needy people can receive food, healthcare and employment, in a place where several organizations share campus space. Family Resource Center pioneered the model in Redmond 20 years ago.

Read more

Tent City 4, ‘a crossroads of humanity,’ returns here

January 26, 2010

Paul Winterstein points out a spot to unload pallets and plywood sheets from a moving truck as Tent City 4 arrives Jan. 23 in Issaquah. By Greg Farrar

Tent City 4 returned last week, hauled piece-by-piece to Community Church of Issaquah, assembled by volunteers and readied for residents to settle into nylon tents by nightfall.

The homeless encampment returned to the Squak Mountain church where congregants last welcomed Tent City 4 in late 2007. The camp will remain at Community Church until late April.

Donald Brown, a Tent City 4 resident dressed in a plastic poncho and a hat with earflaps to protect against the chill, moved into the encampment last year. He described the camp as “a crossroads of humanity” where people with assorted backgrounds and experiences coexist.

“Some people come in and they stay a day,” he said. “Others stay for a year, two years, three years.” Read more

Tent City 4 homeless camp, ‘a crossroads of humanity,’ returns to Issaquah

January 23, 2010

Peter Martin, a resident of Tent City 4 since New Year’s Eve, and a member of the mobile homeless city’s five-member executive committee, carries a bundle of tarp fence framing lumber as pallets and plywood are assembled on moving day, Jan. 23 at Community Church of Issaquah. — Photo by Greg Farrar

NEW — 1:25 p.m. Jan. 23, 2010

Tent City 4 returned Saturday, hauled piece-by-piece to Community Church of Issaquah, assembled by volunteers and readied for residents to settle into nylon tents by nightfall.

The homeless encampment returned to the Squak Mountain church where congregants last welcomed Tent City 4 in late 2007. The camp will remain at Community Church until late April.

Donald Brown, a Tent City 4 resident dressed in a plastic poncho and a hat with earflaps to protect against the chill, moved into the encampment last year. He described the camp as “a crossroads of humanity” where people with assorted backgrounds and experiences coexist.

Read more

John Rittenhouse is proud of human services impact

January 5, 2010

John Rittenhouse

John Rittenhouse

During a single City Council term, John Rittenhouse advanced watershed legislation to reshape city elections and establish a human services campus in Issaquah.

The former councilman led the effort to cap city campaign contributions at $500 for cash and in-kind donations from a single party — a measure the council overwhelmingly approved in May.

Rittenhouse led the push to open a proposed human services campus, a clearinghouse where needy people can receive food, healthcare and employment. The council OK’d the first steps toward a campus — location scouting and business planning — in a unanimous vote last month.

Before Rittenhouse left the council last week, colleagues praised him as affable and effective. Read more

Council OKs human services campus study

December 20, 2009

NEW — 6 a.m. Dec. 20, 2009

A clearinghouse where people in need can receive food, healthcare and employment is a step closer to reality for Issaquah.

Officials hired nonprofit Family Resource Center, of Redmond, to locate a suitable site for a human services campus, engage in business planning and provide legal assistance. City Council members approved the $35,000 pact in a unanimous vote Dec. 7.

Read more

« Previous PageNext Page »